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Cell towers of of past Part one

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posted on Sep, 12 2007 @ 09:59 PM
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The so called experts want you to think the Ancients were dumb with little comunication. WRONG!
Here is a little history the don't want you to KNOW.

LOVE STORIES AND HISTORY
OF TROY

History and love stories repeat themselves though most of us are bound to miss the point every time. Take for example the fall of Troy, a good mix of a love story and history. For centuries Troy was thought to be a fictional kingdom. However, Heinrich Schiemann, a self-educated German businessman read Homer and was convinced of the fundamental truth found in Homer's stories (800 BC). In 1870 Heinrich began to excavate near the village of Hissarlik in Asia Minor (Turkey) . There he found architectural remains in superposed layers and a wealth of objects made of stone, copper, silver, and gold. This find quickly forced the Scholarly World to revise its conclusion about the Heroic age. Schiemann named the site "The City Priam" named for Homer's: King of Troy. After Schiemann’s death, Wilhelm Dorpfeld continued Schiemann's work and between 1893 and 1894 found "The Sixth Settlement.” This was contemporary with the "Mycenaean Epoch" of early Greece and was in turn called "Troy .”

CLYTEMNESA

A good-looking woman named Helen (the wife of Menelmaus, King of Sparta) got the Ancient world in to a twist almost 3100 years ago after she was kidnapped: Menelmaus, Agamemnon and the Greek army went to Troy to free her. Even as the siege ensued, another woman waited in her palace, back at Mycennae in Greece for word of the battle. Her name was Clytemnestra, sister in-law to Helen and the unfaithful wife of Agamemnon the Commander of the Greek forces. Agamemnon had aggravated the problems with Troy by stealing Chryemneis , the daughter of one of the priests of Troy.

Clytemnestra was over 450 miles from Troy by land and 250 miles by a land-sea route. As she paced back and forth, she wondered how long must she wait for news of the siege . If Caesar Augustus's (27 BC to 14 AD) Postal System had been available to her, it would have taken four and a half days to make the trip from Troy, with an average speed of one hundred miles per day. If William F. “Buffalo Bill" Cody's Pony Express was doing the delivery it would have taken three days, based on the best time from St. Joseph to Sacramento. The carrier pigeon message system developed by the Arabs sometime between the 7th and the 9th century AD, would have taken two days if it came back at all. The square sailed ships of the time just would not meet the new racing yacht specifications of today and if the winds were contrary it could have taken weeks: and if Odyssey was in charge years.

The funny thing is that Aeschylus the Greek Dramatist Said that Clytemnestra knew that day. But how could she know? Did space aliens tell her? NO! Was she a clarvoincant? NO! An out of body experience? NO! Catoptromance (a magic Mirror) Yea! Now you're getting close.

THE XENOPHON'S HELLENICA

Xenophon (434-355 BC) an ancient Greek war hero and historian wrote a history of ancient Greece called Hellenica, which contains the phrase to

“Signal with a shield"

This is thought to refer to “reflecting sunlight” with a mirrored shield.” That shield was called an ASPAS the Ancients word for snakes The messages were called “aspasmos” “to handle the snake”: yes they were what you would call snakes.

Aeschylus speaks of a system of dozens of "Beacons" on mountaintops and watchtowers from Troy to Mycennae and Clytemnestra’s palace. This indicates a network of beacons running at light speed over 3,000 years ago and it was not the first of its kind. Such a system would not be instantly useable. It would take time to build watchtowers and climb mountains to find line of sight locations and a code system would also have to be developed. If this story has a hint of truth, there would have to be some remnants of that type of network and of the code system that was used. In the next thread

[edit on 12-9-2007 by Howard]




posted on Sep, 12 2007 @ 10:32 PM
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(scratches head)

So which "they" don't want "you" to know about heliographs?

It's documented history that the Greeks were using them as far back as 405 BC, and you'd know that Clytemnestra used a heliograph if you'd ever read any books on the history of military communication.



posted on Sep, 12 2007 @ 11:44 PM
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Did they really? I don't put much faith in what "we" 'thought' they meant... because 80% of the time we really don't know and is open to speculation, which is what I think we have here. And then we have the pseudoscience which is kind of off in right field....



posted on Sep, 13 2007 @ 03:37 PM
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Originally posted by Tom Bedlam
(scratches head)

So which "they" don't want "you" to know about heliographs?

It's documented history that the Greeks were using them as far back as 405 BC, and you'd know that Clytemnestra used a heliograph if you'd ever read any books on the history of military communication.




You beat me to it, Tom.

For those of you not familiar with this, here's the Wikipedia link:
en.wikipedia.org...

Emperor Tiberius, in 35 AD, got daily coded messages by heliograph to tell him what was going on around the empire. It wasn't usually good news.



posted on Sep, 13 2007 @ 05:24 PM
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This indicates a network of beacons running at light speed over 3,000 years ago and it was not the first of its kind.


Yes, they were called "mirrors" and they used this strange, almost "technological" method of Communicating called "Light". Strangely enough, this "light" also travels at "light speed".



posted on Sep, 13 2007 @ 10:33 PM
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I believe he is refering to the evil 'they'. The they who have spent billions, killed zillions and spent Gadizzillon of hours to keep from us that the ancient Greeks knew how to reflect sunlight.....



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