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Lack of CCTV hampers girl search

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posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 04:41 AM
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Lack of CCTV hampers girl search


news.bbc.co.uk

A lack of CCTV footage is hampering police trying to trace a 17-year-old girl who went missing a week ago.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 04:42 AM
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Ive heard about the 'Police State' with camaras but at times like this you relise that it might not be all bad with more camara's. Theres a pic on that site so if you see her, tell some one, like the police.


Take Care, Vix

news.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 04:46 AM
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I dont see anything good with more cameras...

But situations like this are few and far between. Would you rather give up your privacy to make sure this 1 kid was safe?

I wouldnt.

ya that goes if I was in her position also.

I dont think people should give up freedoms so it makes them feel safer.



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 04:55 AM
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how will putting up a few more camaras not make us free ?


Take Care, Vix



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 05:08 AM
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Here in the states we have an amendment that states:



www.post-gazette.com...
Amendment IX: The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.


Which means altho it is not a right, we do have a right to privacy. To many cameras = alot less privacy.. I don't know about you But i don't think walking down the street being stared at by 500 cameras is a good thing..

Granted I agree they should be in places like stores and banks and whatever, but on the street.. I don't think so.

A tad more from that link in case you don't look at it.



The Constitution mentions nothing called the "right of privacy." In 1973 the Supreme Court, relying in large part on preceding rulings that overturned state laws forbidding contraception, found that an inherent right to personal privacy existed. In turn, the courts used those assumed rights as a partial foundation for an unprecedented ruling that limited the extent to which states could restrict abortion. The case, Roe v. Wade, pitted an anonymous young woman against the district attorney of Dallas County, Texas, and opened the door to widespread access to legal abortion -- a decision that is still a flashpoint between those who see it as emancipating for women and others who view it as dehumanizing the unborn. The young plaintiff in the case, known then as Roe, was Norma McCorvey.


[edit on 8/3/2007 by ThichHeaded]

[edit on 8/3/2007 by ThichHeaded]



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