Homeless get mansions--good idea or not?

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posted on Mar, 23 2007 @ 03:12 PM
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A Hawaiian woman and her five daughters moved from a homeless shelter to a mansion thanks to a generous Japanese real-estate mogul.


Kawamoto, one of Japan's richest men, said he plans to open eight of his 22 Kahala homes to needy Hawaiian families. They will be able to stay in the homes for up to 10 years, he said.

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Obviously Genshiro Kawamoto is a very generous man.. pretty hard to find fault in that. In Kahale's case I think it's great because she works (as a service rep for a telecomm company), but just couldn't afford her rent after a landlord jacked up the price.

In other cases, I don't agree with giving huge white columned houses to homeless people. What if the person is just too lazy to get a job like the rest of us? Do they really deserve a free mansion because of their stinky old clothes and tough life? I don't think so.

Kahale does not fall into that category. She was at least trying to pay the bills before rent became overwhelming. I guess rent can get expensive when property values skyrocket due to gentrification (caused by rich japanese real-estate moguls).




posted on Mar, 24 2007 @ 05:56 PM
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In other cases, I don't agree with giving huge white columned houses to homeless people.


I'd agree with that too, if they were just giving away free houses to any homeless guy that walks up to them. Get a job and buy a house like the rest of us.

But in this case I think it's nothing bad.



Do you think they are going to want to leave when the 10 years is up? Mansion back to shelter - big change.



posted on Mar, 24 2007 @ 10:16 PM
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When it's all boiled down, how can it NOT be a good idea to give 'mansions to the homeless' ?

How fantastic that this Japanese 'mogul' has taken this initiative!

How much better, perhaps, if he'd sold the mansions and replaced them with several dozen 'normal' homes for the underprivileged ? But that sounds like quibbling, which I don't mean to do -- just a practical suggestion.

There are SO many good and generous folk, just as there are so many who're deserving of a helping hand.

I think this is a wonderful story and example. And I believe that there are many in society who would do likewise, were they financially able to do so.

Yes, it will be hard for the recipients of the Japanese gentleman's generosity to depart such luxury homes at the end of the ten years, so we can hope like mad that financial organisations such as banks, etc. will offer financial advice to the homeless, so that when they ARE required to depart their lovely homes --- they will have saved enough to buy homes (more modest obviously) of their own.

It's great, this story. All positive :-)



posted on Mar, 25 2007 @ 09:56 AM
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I absolutely LOVE this story! It's a wonderfully generous thing for this man to do! I hope he knows how important his generous offer is.


Originally posted by Scramjet76
What if the person is just too lazy to get a job like the rest of us? Do they really deserve a free mansion because of their stinky old clothes and tough life?


If a generous man gives of his heart, then yes, they deserve it. In my opinion, it's not for us to judge this gift. Who knows? IF (I'm just saying "if") some other homeless people are "just too lazy to get a job like the rest of us" who knows what impact a gnerous non-judgmental gift like this could be in their life? It's very possible that the gift itself could reach a homeless "stinky" person the way no other circumstances could.

I will reserve judgment and praise the generosity and true "heart" of the rich guy.


Great Story!


[edit on 25-3-2007 by Benevolent Heretic]



posted on Mar, 26 2007 @ 02:53 PM
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hey heretic-

I see where your coming from. I'm just trying to strike a chord with the values of american hard work. I'm not sure how I feel about a homeless individual who was too lazy to even try working, getting something for nothing. Just reminds me of a badly behaved child who won't stop crying so the parents just give in and buy them a toy.



posted on Mar, 26 2007 @ 03:06 PM
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Seems like a free ride to homeless people in my opinion. It was a somewhat short article.. But I can find no sort of rehabilitation plan for these people. They are just being given the houses and having to pay utilities for 10 years and then what's going to happen? Let them fall on their face? In short, it's a positive plan, giving them time to get back on their feet. There's just holes in this strategy which are setting them up for failure.

I don't mean to judge her on looks, but it seems her whole salary is going towards food..



posted on Mar, 26 2007 @ 03:11 PM
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That was very generous to help someone out of poverty.

However I don't see this as a logical solution to poverty.



posted on Mar, 26 2007 @ 05:02 PM
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Originally posted by Scramjet76
I'm not sure how I feel about a homeless individual who was too lazy to even try working, getting something for nothing.


Well, there's your problem.
You're assuming being homeless automatically means a person is "too lazy to even try working". Big, bad, incorrect assumption.

As I stated in the "Labels" thread by chissler in this forum, I was once homeless and it had nothing to do with laziness or unwillingness to work. If you think all homeless people are there because they're lazy, perhaps you should read more about it.


At least visit chissler's thread.


To address bluesquareapple's point of rehabilitation, the people are going to have 10 years to figure that out. I think that's enough time to get a job and work through their issues.


Originally posted by bluesquareapple
I don't mean to judge her on looks, but it seems her whole salary is going towards food..


You don't mean to? You mean that just slipped out?


The cheapest food is high in carbohydrates. Carbohydrates make you fat. The diet of poor people many times is carb-laden and therefore eating 2 or 3 meals a day of cheap carbs results in overweight poor people. But you can be sure their diet doesn't contain lean protein and lots of fruits and vegetables as most of us are lucky enough to afford.

To both of you - You cannot group homeless people and judge them any more than you can any other group.



posted on Mar, 26 2007 @ 06:27 PM
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This is his money and houses and he's free to do with them whatever he pleases, but I think the money would be better spent by helping the homeless into affordable housing that someday they might be able to afford themselves. This would allow more people to be helped and help them to become self-sufficient.

[edit on 3/26/2007 by djohnsto77]



posted on Mar, 27 2007 @ 10:21 PM
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Well, there's your problem. You're assuming being homeless automatically means a person is "too lazy to even try working". Big, bad, incorrect assumption.

As I stated in the "Labels" thread by chissler in this forum, I was once homeless and it had nothing to do with laziness or unwillingness to work. If you think all homeless people are there because they're lazy, perhaps you should read more about it.


At least visit chissler's thread.



im not actually not assuming anyting. There would have to be some method of screening the homeless. no i mean some of them are going to be the "to lazy to even try working" types, while others not. I'm sure every homeless person has quite a story.


Yes I was one of first to respond to that roles thread from that book chissler was reading. I guess was short blurp I wrote but roles just come automatically from stereotyping (which is unavoidable).



[edit on 27-3-2007 by Scramjet76]



posted on Mar, 27 2007 @ 11:58 PM
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I have been saying for years---if the Bill Gates of the World would help a few families, there wouldn't be so much poverty. I mean there is so many 20 million dollar per movie actors and actresses out there that could just help out.

I see nothing wrong with giving this family free rent for the next 10 years. As long as they don't destroy his house and get a job even if the job is flipping hamburgers.

It made me very happy to hear what this man did. He's been blessed and he's passing it around. Nothing wrong with that.



posted on Mar, 28 2007 @ 08:06 AM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
This is his money and houses and he's free to do with them whatever he pleases, but I think the money would be better spent by helping the homeless into affordable housing that someday they might be able to afford themselves. This would allow more people to be helped and help them to become self-sufficient.

[edit on 3/26/2007 by djohnsto77]


Good point, dj

Habitat for Humanity could have done a lot with that kind of cash......still, it is his house. I wonder how he'll deal with the issue of getting her out, when the ten years are up......She'll be older, and perhaps ailing, unless his generous offer includes medical care.

And as bluesquare pointed out.....who will be paying the utility bills? Will she be have to pay taxes, on whatever the normal rental on this mansion would be....(as if she'd received a cash gift/income)?? I'd be a bit leery of such an offer, even if I were homeless......would sound toooo good.


SR

posted on Mar, 28 2007 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by frayed1

Originally posted by djohnsto77
This is his money and houses and he's free to do with them whatever he pleases, but I think the money would be better spent by helping the homeless into affordable housing that someday they might be able to afford themselves. This would allow more people to be helped and help them to become self-sufficient.

[edit on 3/26/2007 by djohnsto77]


Good point, dj

Habitat for Humanity could have done a lot with that kind of cash......still, it is his house. I wonder how he'll deal with the issue of getting her out, when the ten years are up......She'll be older, and perhaps ailing, unless his generous offer includes medical care.

And as bluesquare pointed out.....who will be paying the utility bills? Will she be have to pay taxes, on whatever the normal rental on this mansion would be....(as if she'd received a cash gift/income)?? I'd be a bit leery of such an offer, even if I were homeless......would sound toooo good.



I agree and he might as well just give her the house instead of the ten years but you can look at it that he's actually helping her and the family more by just giving them a house he's giving them an opportunity to become self sufficent and build a life so that they don't become homeless again.

One of my ex girlfriends used to work for a charity called Shelter and she dealt with homeless people and although alot of them have serious problems that lead to them becoming homeless there are alot that actually want to work and have a 'normal' life but they haven't got the basics i.e. a roof over there heads, change of clothes, a meal a day and basic stuff like razors etc. that we take for granted and so can't get back into 'society' just like that if i were in a homeless persons position it'd be like all my birthdays come at once with an offer like that lol.

It's a really good story and it's win win for the family and the property mogul who will be getting good publicity.



posted on Mar, 28 2007 @ 04:07 PM
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And as bluesquare pointed out.....who will be paying the utility bills?


I think the article said Kahale has to pay for the utility bills but that's her only expense (staying there).



posted on Mar, 28 2007 @ 09:03 PM
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I think this is a wonderful thing to do and more people that have this kind of money should do something in this nature.

"Homeless people" are not necessarily "bums" or "lazy".
I'm sure these people didn't wake up one morning and say "gee I think I will live on the street or car or in a box and wear dirty clothes and smell like crap." Boy that sounds like the life.

Something has happened to these folks. These people are you and me that met extreme circumstances and couldn't pull themselves out and here comes along a gentleman that is giving these people some dignity and a chance.

I see nothing wrong with this outside of the individual starting this thread Scramjet judging thier integrity.

Shame on you!



posted on Mar, 28 2007 @ 09:18 PM
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gunna be hard after 10 years having to move back into the streets..


I bet the neighbors are loving it as well...... driving down the home values...

Bet they throw awsome parties though. And I bet mr. Japan man will be surprised when they destroy is million dollar homes.



posted on Mar, 28 2007 @ 09:27 PM
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I can only hope the homeless will take care of the property and not ruin the property of the goodwill that has been bestowed on them.
What a lucky break.
God Bless the homeowner- what a great deed.



posted on Mar, 29 2007 @ 08:23 AM
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Originally posted by Scramjet76



And as bluesquare pointed out.....who will be paying the utility bills?


I think the article said Kahale has to pay for the utility bills but that's her only expense (staying there).


Yep, she will be paying the utility bills......and she might be able to if she's careful....with 5 kids, she will be constantly going through the house to turn off the lights!!

She was able to pay her rent when it was $800, but not when it went to $1200.....Now I don't know how big of a 'foot print' a mansion in Hawaii would have, the weather is nice, so heating and cooling might not be so expensive....but I'd hold my breath till that first bill came........





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