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Chirac Makes Statement About Iran--Then Backtracks

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posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 09:57 PM
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France's President Jacques Chirac in a tape-recorded interview with the New York Times said on Monday that he believed that it was not dangerous to the international community for Iran to possess nuclear weapons, and that if they did use them, it would result in the destruction of Tehran. He then on Wednesday retracted those statements, insisting that indeed that Iran's possession of nuclear weapons would pose a grave threat to Israel and the international community. His statement underlines both divisions in the international community and France with respect to Iran policy, and Chirac's personal struggle with a neurological episode in 2005 that has allegedly weakened his conversational skills.
 



www.nytimes.com
President Jacques Chirac said this week that if Iran had one or two nuclear weapons, it would not pose a big danger, and that if Iran were to launch a nuclear weapon against a country like Israel, it would lead to the immediate destruction of Tehran.

The remarks, made in an interview on Monday with The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune and Le Nouvel Observateur, a weekly magazine, were vastly different from stated French policy and what Mr. Chirac has often said.

On Tuesday, Mr. Chirac summoned the same journalists back to Élysée Palace to retract many of his remarks.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


The main problem here is not Chirac's statements per se. The problem is that they are inconsistent. They are trying, it seems, to both hold a hard line with Iran and to encourage Iran to come to the table. This is an admirable goal: if they can be encouraged to come to the table and thereby avert a conflict, then all the better. But the inconsistency of message both confuses and exposes cracks in the international community when solidarity is essential. In these dangerous times, our leadership must be much more careful.

[edit on 1/31/2007 by Togetic]




posted on Feb, 1 2007 @ 06:26 PM
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Right, the prime minister of appeasment, er, france trying to show some other country a hard line? I'm sure he's really telling iran that if they nuke Israel, france will go to the UN to debate an "appropriate response".

Chirac is playing a very dangerous game by appearing to side with countries that are openly hostile to the U.S. so as to appease the growing muslim population in france. IMO, Chirac=C.E.S.M.



posted on Feb, 1 2007 @ 07:56 PM
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Originally posted by Togetic
The main problem here is not Chirac's statements per se. The problem is that they are inconsistent. They are trying, it seems, to both hold a hard line with Iran and to encourage Iran to come to the table. This is an admirable goal: if they can be encouraged to come to the table and thereby avert a conflict, then all the better. But the inconsistency of message both confuses and exposes cracks in the international community when solidarity is essential. In these dangerous times, our leadership must be much more careful.

[edit on 1/31/2007 by Togetic]

Iran will not come to the table unless there is a large stick attached to the invitation. They do not believe they need a "carrot", since they have been able to pursue their nuke ambitions without one.

Intense, global sanctions is the only way to stop them. Before we need to progress to step 2.



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