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wtc steel problem?

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posted on Dec, 29 2006 @ 03:01 PM
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interesting article here regarding the steel used in both the twin towers and the statue of liberty.

are there any experts here to verify the claims?




posted on Dec, 29 2006 @ 03:13 PM
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I'll call this article "corn after it has been through a male cow's digestive tract". In my experience galvanic corrosion would eat through the aluminum instead of the steel. Ships actually have zinc electrodes that are designed to erode by corrosion to protect the steel in their hulls. I have seen many examples of this type of corrosion in aircraft structures. It is known in aviation as dissimilar metal corrosion. This usually occurrs around a steel bolt or bushing in an aluminum structure. Every example of it that I have seen has the aluminum pitted or fretted while the steel is in pristine condition.



posted on Dec, 29 2006 @ 09:10 PM
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From that article,


Reason - the exterior cast aluminum WTC panels had been directly connected to the steel superstructure of the building, thus causing galvanic corrosion.


The aluminum was not connected directly to the steel. There was ample space between them to prevent corrosion.




posted on Dec, 30 2006 @ 09:50 AM
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Originally posted by JIMC5499
I'll call this article "corn after it has been through a male cow's digestive tract". In my experience galvanic corrosion would eat through the aluminum instead of the steel. Ships actually have zinc electrodes that are designed to erode by corrosion to protect the steel in their hulls. I have seen many examples of this type of corrosion in aircraft structures. It is known in aviation as dissimilar metal corrosion. This usually occurrs around a steel bolt or bushing in an aluminum structure. Every example of it that I have seen has the aluminum pitted or fretted while the steel is in pristine condition.


I'll have to agree with you. In this kind of corrosion the "weakest" metal is corroded while the "strongest" remains. Here's what Wikipedia has to say, my bolding:



Galvanic corrosion occurs when a galvanic cell is formed between two dissimilar metals. The resulting electrochemical potential then leads to formation of an electric current that leads to electrolytic dissolving of the less noble material. This effect can be prevented by electrical insulation of the materials, eg. by using rubber or plastic sleeves or washers, keeping the parts dry so there is no electrolyte to form the cell, or keeping the size of the less-noble material significantly larger than the more noble ones (eg. stainless-steel bolts in an aluminum block won't cause corrosion, but aluminum rivets on stainless steel sheet would rapidly corrode.

Galvonic corrosion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



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