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Could you stick a thrust vectoring nozel on a typhoon?

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posted on Nov, 24 2006 @ 12:23 PM
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A while back I saw a short documentary about a joint US German experiment where they basically took an F-18 and slapped a thrust vectoring nozzle on the back. This allowed greater aerial agility and, more importantly, drastically cut the take off/landing area needed.
I was wondering would this (if financially viable) be possible on a typhoon. I know its ultra agile already but being able to land a typhoon on a carrier would be incredibly useful. Is this possible or is the typhoon too unstable to even try.




posted on Nov, 24 2006 @ 12:53 PM
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It's possible, sure, there are plans for it but whether it will actually happen is uncertain. You can't just put it on there though, the engines would have to be redesigned to accommodate TCV. And I don't know how useful 3D TVC would be seeing as how the clearance between the engine exhausts isn't that great. Anyway, TVC adds weight to the aircraft and it really does nothing towards a carrier Typhoon. That idea brings with it far greater challenges, both technical and financial that make it a no starter.



posted on Nov, 24 2006 @ 01:00 PM
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NASA has tested vector trust on many aircraft including an F-15 and F-18.

however the US decided to go for a new design that incorporates them since day 1. I guess in order to use its full capabilities a new design is a better option. But someone will say yeah but the Russians did with an old plane...

We all that was because they don't have the money to develop an all new fighter...



posted on Nov, 24 2006 @ 01:42 PM
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Originally posted by Polskoo24
A while back I saw a short documentary about a joint US German experiment where they basically took an F-18 and slapped a thrust vectoring nozzle on the back.


While the US also tried the F-18 with thrust vectoring, the US-german joint project was the MBB-Rockwell X-31, a purpose-built testbed aircraft to maximize possibilities and data output. The engine and TVC equipment were mainly built by german MBB (Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm) and nowadays MTU Aeuroengines develops the Typhoon TVC technology. Both MBB and MTU were part of DASA (now EADS) until 2000. BTW, if I am not mistaken the X-31 was the most-flown aircraft by sorties of all the experimental planes built under NASA authority.

And yes, it IS possible to put TVC on the Eurofighter Typhoon (see below).



Originally posted by WestPoint23
It's possible, sure, there are plans for it but whether it will actually happen is uncertain.


The technology is just short of being finalised, literally all it needs is a definitive "go" (and the accompanying funds...) of at least a part of the user nations. Implementation is seen as possible from 2010 onwards (timeframe includes the necessary flight clarifications and tests).


You can't just put it on there though, the engines would have to be redesigned to accommodate TCV.


Well, thats why both the EJ200 turbine and the Eurofighter fuselage are already built so they can accomodate the TVC equipment
. Mind you, the first 3d TVC flight of a Typhoon took place in 1998. No major work on the aircraft in general is necessary for the system, right now they are working on making it lighter and ensure durability.


And I don't know how useful 3D TVC would be seeing as how the clearance between the engine exhausts isn't that great.


Still it could benefit at least as much as an one-engined TVC aircraft, no? And TVC is not only useable for extreme maneuvers, they can improve general flight stability, allow drag reduction and may ease structural stresses during maneuvers. A 2D TVC isnt as helpful for these applications.

Anyway, here´s a comprehensive article with details to the EJ200 engine and the TVC technology - quite interesting I´d say because its method of operation seems so simple yet effective. Basically the nozzle forms a three-part cardan joint that both allow for as little as three or four actuators to be used as well as keeping these actuators away from the intense heat.



[edit on 24/11/2006 by Lonestar24]



posted on Nov, 24 2006 @ 02:05 PM
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Originally posted by Lonestar24
The technology is just short of being finalised, literally all it needs is a definitive "go" (and the accompanying funds...) of at least a part of the user nations.


That's the kicker isn't it, whether or not the money is there, I personally don't see all the major partners agreeing that TVC is absolutely necessary.

Also, an airframe and FCS built form the ground up to support 2D TVC can be just as maneuverable as one with 3D TVC added on later.



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