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Atmospheric spectral absorptivty (GLOBAL WARMING)

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posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 04:05 PM
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I'm trying to understand the relation of radiation absorption of atmospheric gasses to the heat transfer rate of the atmosphere. This is a fundamental key to understanding global warming theory.

Published charts typically show the absorptivity of a gas as a percent against a radiation frequency. Example: 100% blocks all radiation for that frequency.

My question is what quantity of gas within what volume are those numbers based?
Is this a theoretical number based on a single molecule or is this a measured quantity?

Thanks for your response.

Joseph




posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 04:37 PM
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Dont know, BUT,
if you think about it, it can only be an educated guess.
How can one measure all of the gasses released by everything
at the same time, You cant.



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 04:42 PM
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Many times measurements are based on standard quantities such a mole. I haven't yet been able to find how these "spectral absorptivity" numbers are derived, but the use of such effects heat transfer calculations.

[edit on 31-7-2006 by Joseph Kempton]



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 02:37 AM
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Does anyone know if streets/blacktop/parkinglots are included in global warming models ? these things absorbe alot of energy from the sun dont they ?



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 01:59 PM
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Does anyone know if streets/blacktop/parkinglots are included in global warming models ? these things absorbe alot of energy from the sun dont they ?

The phenomenon is known as the heat island effect.

It is included with regards to modified average temperatures by adding a negative factor based on population. But the number is really a "guess". It could either ovecompensate or undercompensate.



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 02:59 AM
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Thats interesting.
I wonder if the number is of any value.



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