It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Is this technology are applicable in war machines?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:
Fye

posted on Jun, 29 2006 @ 09:32 AM
link   
I wondering, there is some technology that could significantly boost the ability of certain war machines. Im interested at the concept of Magnetohydrodinamic Drive for submarines and application of artificial muscle in army weaponry or armor (or such)

How far this technology from real application, or was it already developed? If in development, is there anyone who might knows how far it progressed?

Im specifically interested in magnetohydrodinamic drive since it could help creating significantly effective and agile submarine compared to present technology. Though it still had some difficulities for going stealth due to some aspect (water movement creating detectable gas turbulence, etc. ), I believe that this method is promising ^^




posted on Jun, 29 2006 @ 09:38 AM
link   
those are both DARPA projects, artificial muscle is already in pre production in Japan for helping lift patients into and out of beds in hospitals.

Your maghydro drive is reasearch stage, the movie red october notwithstanding. But, russia does have somewhat of an edge in Advanced submarine research over the US, but the US has better production capabilities.


Fye

posted on Jun, 29 2006 @ 10:04 AM
link   
Ah, right...the EAP, yes? Japan always one step ahead when it comes to nanotech aplication ^^

Hahaha....Im not inspired by Red October, actually....Im an otaku, you know ^^ Thanks for the info



posted on Jul, 1 2006 @ 08:10 AM
link   
I'm not sure about the Submarine drives, but I can tell you that the Application of Nanotechnology will significantly change the way wars are fought.

It will make the barrier between power, and weak.

Shattered OUT...



posted on Jul, 3 2006 @ 04:15 AM
link   
magneto hydrodynamics has been covered on a number of threads. It is nice in theory but doesnt work in practice due to the poor conductivilty of the water leading to a need for massive magnetic flux densities, beyond our current ability, in order to make it efficient.

In the 90's the japanese took the lead in this field of research with Yamato 1.

after several more prototypes, they achieved a maximum speed of.........



15 km/h!!!


there are currently a number of limited projects looking into this idea, but i am afraid it is still a long long way off as a practical means of propulsion.


wikipedia has a number of pages on the subject.
en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...



new topics

top topics
 
0

log in

join