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Atom and Exclusion principle

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posted on Jun, 1 2006 @ 09:28 AM
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Forgive me if I get a few basic things wrong in this thread as I have just read about the Paulli exclusion principle and I am still a bit unsure about it.

Since protons and neutrons are fermions, they follow Fermi-Dirac statistics and therefore follow the Exclusion principle. Therefore, does this mean that every proton and neutron in the nucleus of an atom has a different quantum state ?




posted on Jun, 1 2006 @ 12:50 PM
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The answer is yes.

Protons and neutrons are not identical particles. But these both species are fermions for sure, and each is subject to Pauli's law.

Therefore, similar to electrons orbiting the nucleus, protons inside the nucleus are all in different quantum states. There are certain models that try to represent it as different "shells" that such particles occupy. Of course, one has to introduce an "effective field" inside the nucleus if one has to get quantitative results.

The nucleus can get "excited" (just like an atom) and give off a gamma ray. This can be modeled, again, as nucleons shifting between shells.

This is still a fairly imperfect theory. But calculating the nucleus has never been easy.


Originally posted by siddharthsma
Forgive me if I get a few basic things wrong in this thread as I have just read about the Paulli exclusion principle and I am still a bit unsure about it.

Since protons and neutrons are fermions, they follow Fermi-Dirac statistics and therefore follow the Exclusion principle. Therefore, does this mean that every proton and neutron in the nucleus of an atom has a different quantum state ?



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