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McGill Scientists Aim to Rewire Traumatic Thoughts (Real Mind Control!)

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posted on Feb, 2 2006 @ 09:41 PM
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Propranolol is a betablocker discovered over 25 years ago and has long been prescribed for hypertension and migraine headaches. Propranolol also has a newly discovered property.

It dampens memories.

 



www.canada.com
McGill University researchers in Montreal are using a common blood pressure drug to make "fixed" bad memories unstable and as pliable as playdough.

The experiments build on a discovery five years ago that recalling an emotionally charged memory returns the memory to a state where it can be tampered with or stopped from "reconsolidating."

When humans take in new information -- whether it's a phone number, or seeing someone killed -- the memory is "labile" at first, or chemically unstable.

But at some point within the next six hours, a flood of proteins produced by the brain moves the memory from short-term to a long-term imprint.

But long-term memories aren't nearly as hardwired as once thought. Scientists now say that if a highly emotional memory is reactivated and those proteins blocked with a drug such as propranolol, it may be possible to stop the memory from being restabilized.

The goal is to, at the very least, dampen down traumatic memories.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Soma anyone? And since it's off patent it'll be cheap.

McGill.

Home of mind control research.


Ottawa Citizen
The documents shed light on the CIA's vextensive behavior-control projects, including work by McGill University's Ewen Cameron, who brainwashed patients with agency funding in Montreal. But many records had already been destroyed. Still other files remain locked away to this day.



Mind Control Victims to Have Their Day in Court
“There are about 200 people still due compensation,” he said. “This judgment should send out strong signals to the Canadian government. Those who have previously missed out should have a strong case for appealing.”

Using techniques similar to those portrayed in the celebrated novel the Manchurian Candidate, it was believed that people could be brainwashed and reprogrammed to carry out specific acts.

Cameron developed a range of depatterning “treatments” while director of the Allan Memorial Institute at McGill University.


I found it interesting that the propranolol story as reported in La Presse contains this paragraph:


«L'étude est toujours en cours, souligne de Dr Brunet. On est à la recherche de participants.» (Les personnes intéressées peuvent appeler au 514-761-6131 #2368).


They're looking for study participants.

So... who has some bad memories to erase?


[edit on 2/2/2006 by Gools]

[edit on 2/20/2006 by Gools]




posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 11:11 AM
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I posted this story to ATSNN over two weeks ago, and it was moved to OCE. I was unaware of the connection to Ewen Cameron and CIA mind-control experiments in Montreal. Rumor has it that Ewen's brothers (?) Duncan and Edward Cameron were involved with the PX and the Montauk Project. Edward was reportedly 'regressed' and given the new identity of Al Bielek. Ewen is (was?) reported to be 'truly evil'. It all somehow dovetails nicely into Beta-blockers inhibiting sensory memory recall, doesn't it?

I take BP meds, and the timing was such that I ran out of my calcium-channel blocker med, Norvasc, just as I saw and posted the story. I happened to have some samples of Toprol-XL (metoprolol succinate), a beta-blocker, so I started taking them. Some of my more emotional memories do seem a bit more remote now, but this is hardly what one would call a controlled, scientific experiment. Nothing like what old Ewen had going in Montreal for the CIA.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

www.bielek.com...



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 11:12 AM
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Still other files remain locked away to this day.

Interesting. Wonder if some of those secreted files were in the hands of the people doing this research.

It looks like the "principle researcher" is Dr. Alain Brunet, assistant professor in the psychiatry department at Mcgill.

The article also sites a Karim Nader; associate professor of psychology. He apparently does research in the University's Behavioural Neuroscience Study Area.


Apparently researchers at Harvard have also done some work on this drug so Roger Pitman, a psychiatrist at Harvard is working with them too.
Also noted:

The Article
Propranolol isn't the only memory-muting agent being tested. Another is the antibiotic D-cycloserine, which is being used in conjunction with what's called extinction learning, according to Brunet.

"Let's say you were involved in a bad car accident with a red truck. The colour red will remind you of the car accident. That's fear conditioning. If I present the colour red over and over again, and nothing bad happens, at first it will remind you of your trauma. But eventually it will only very remotely remind you of your trauma. That's extinction learning."



It will be interesting to follow up with the research results in a few months.

Here is the webpage for the McGill Department of Psychology



According to this page Dr. Brunet has run Internships programs working on people who've been through "Disaster Accident War/Terrorism".



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 11:31 AM
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Good luck with this story. You might think that this would be of interest to the conspiracy community, but apparently not:

(submission) (news) Traumatic Memory Suppression



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 03:17 PM
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I too have noticed the fact that this is still a submission. The conspiracy crowd is dropping the ball big time....this is hard core mind control potential.

My initial thought with this story..(hadn't encountered the link you had provided, Grady)...was that the muddling of traumatic thoughts after the fact by provoking the memory is possibly going to bring with it memory(ies) that have accumulated in the interim. So what happens if you muddle non-traumatic memories that have some kind of association with the traumatic memory? The risk would be taking away some potential social experience that is relevant to the individual. I of course wanted to do a bit more research prior to a more in-depth response….but this submission needs to get its’ feet off the ground…


The Patriot Act ain’t going to mean much people if drugs become a more honed manipulation. They already medicate/manipulate the neurotransmitter ratios of people who may or may not have ADHD, Depression…fill in the blank minor ‘mental illness that could possibly be fixed by normal activity’….even fluoride has been implicated, along with an over stimulation of cortisol/adrenaline through caffeine, sugar and high protein diets.

Yet all we see so far are general applications……this story shows that the technology is getting more and more specific……though I do still question the effects on indirectly associated memories after the trauma event. I’ll do a bit more research….



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 09:10 PM
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If it works I wonder how many people who've been prescribed propranolol over the last 25 years now have memory problems?

Class action suit anyone?

The prospect of playing around with memories is disconcerting to say the least.

Does the fact that this "option" now exists mean that someday we will see lobby groups advocating it's use for victims of crimes like rape and assault and others advocating that it should not be done on "moral" or "religious" grounds?

Also, what if something like this were made part of a court sentence? For example, erase someone's memory who learned how to crack safes etc.
.

[edit on 2/3/2006 by Gools]



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 11:08 PM
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You are right on with your queries. The TV News discussion I saw on this issue mentioned rape trauma as a possible application of the med, with one side arguing it might help the victim, and the other arguing it might hurt the criminal case against the perp by inhibiting recall of the event.



posted on Jul, 2 2007 @ 11:06 PM
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I think for the time being at least, this is not too much to worry about.

You can call this mind control, but it's not really what most people mean when they think of mind control.

In this sense, everything is mind control from education, to music, to hypnosis, to any psychoactive substance, including beverage alcohol, marijuana, anti-depressants, etc.

These medications are being studied to help diminish the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and if you have any knowledge of PTSD, you know that the very fact that medical treatments are being sought indicates that PTSD is now considered to be a real medical condition.

Those who have suffered from PTSD have traditionally been treated as though they are crazy, weak, or malingering.

I'm not sure how this research will turn out, but if it can help people lead more normal lives after having experiences "outside the range of usual human experience," then I'd say that it's not a bad thing.


[edit on 2007/7/2 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Jul, 3 2007 @ 07:37 PM
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You can call this an 'addendum' or 'resource' for mind control...a problem is that people try to define mind control in one sentence. Mind Control is actually a conglomerate of techniques and manipulations, encompassing the psychological (social, emotional), physical (chemical, pain induction, etc) and mental (disinformation, confusion, LACK of education). A drug like this, while may be helpful for those who wish to dampen traumatic situations (see "The Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind"), can also be used in more subversive ways.

All things considered, they probably have improved methods of whatever type available to them years ago....



posted on Jul, 3 2007 @ 08:38 PM
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Wow, there sure seems to be a lot of souls out there heaping piles of filth upon themselves.

Cool.




posted on Jul, 4 2007 @ 01:18 AM
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Not necessarily, lunatic....combine a complex description/topic with a myriad of unrelated topics usually equals....confusion!!..Which usually leads to disinterest...



posted on Jul, 4 2007 @ 07:02 PM
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Originally posted by MemoryShock
Not necessarily, lunatic....combine a complex description/topic with a myriad of unrelated topics usually equals....confusion!!..Which usually leads to disinterest...


lol, well said......which also, incidentally, leads to apathy which is a child of sloth and one of the deadlies



posted on Jul, 4 2007 @ 10:40 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpottThese medications are being studied to help diminish the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and if you have any knowledge of PTSD, you know that the very fact that medical treatments are being sought indicates that PTSD is now considered to be a real medical condition.


That was exactly my first thought -- that it could help soldiers returning from Iraq. On the flip side of that, there's the risk that the VA will simply hand out pills and not address the real problem with psychiatric support. But it MIGHT be better than a lifetime of nightmares.



posted on Jul, 5 2007 @ 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by Byrd
That was exactly my first thought -- that it could help soldiers returning from Iraq. But it MIGHT be better than a lifetime of nightmares.


So they have another name for a 'conscience' now ? PTSD ?

Cool, one definition gets in the way, we'll just label it as something else and give you a memory-wiping pill (or whatever).

lol, mankind is hilarious, you gotta admit that



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