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IIAF in Congo mission.

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NR

posted on Nov, 14 2005 @ 01:22 AM
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In 1962 IIAF sent a squadron of F-86s along with air and ground crew to support UN forces in Congo to fight insurgents. There were no losses. Missions involved strafing and aerial bombardment of the guerillas' hideouts. The squadron performed above expectations and medals were awarded by UN to the IIAF officers involved.


Here are the officers who participated in that mission. Photo taken after receiving their awards from Gen. Khatam.





Front row from left to right: Abolmolouk second , Zolali thrid, General Khatami centre, Ebadi sixth.
Back row from left to right: Mirzaian fourth, Vaezi sixth, Fakouri seventh.
(the ones I can recognize, all pilots)



NR

posted on Nov, 14 2005 @ 01:25 AM
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Also God bless one of the best pilot who ever lived on earth which was General Khatami who died in a kite accident falling off from a 100 meters to his death. A very said inccident indeed....


www.iiaf.net...



posted on Nov, 21 2005 @ 12:37 PM
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It is wonderful that the IIAF could benefit from the American aircraft industy, and in turn help UN forces.

We can only hope that the future will be as bright for both sides, and that if things become more heated, cooler heads will prevail and our two countries can work things out for the worlds sake.

On a side note, here is a brief but informative history of the AMerican designed F-86.




In 1944, North American Aviation submitted a design for a swept-wing day fighter which could also be used as a dive-bomber or escort fighter. Two prototype XP-86s were contracted in late 1944, but were not built until after WWII due to the incorporation of several design modifications which were prompted by German research data. The first XP-86 prototype flew on 1 October 1947, powered by a 3,750-pound thrust G.E. J35 engine. After it was re-engined with a more powerful G.E. J47 turbojet the following spring, it was redesignated the YP-86A, and exceeded the speed of sound in a shallow dive. The first production model was initially designated the P-86A, but became the F-86A in June 1948. By the time the new fighter entered US Air Force service in 1949, it had gained the name "Sabre."

Many variants were produced throughout the Sabre's life, the most numerous being the F-86D, an all-weather/night fighter, or which 2,054 were built. In addition to the Sabres built by North American, Canadair Ltd. in Montreal built 60 F-86Es for the US Air Force, plus at least 1,750 Sabre Mk 2/3/4/5/6s for the Royal Canadian Air Force and the Royal Air Force. The later Sabres were powered by various models of the native Orenda engine. Construction of the Sabre was also undertaken by Australia's Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation, which modified the aircraft design to accept two 30-mm Aden guns and a Rolls-Royce Avon 26 engine. Similarly, Fiat in Italy assembled at least 220 F-86Ks from component kits provided by North American, and Japan's Mitsubishi company assembled approximately 300 more


- One Man Short



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