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Bigfoot atop the Food Chain?

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posted on Nov, 7 2005 @ 11:34 PM
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Sasquatch is believed to be an omnivore and an opportunity carnivore -- he only takes game when very convenient and wanders within his reach. He is not believed to pursue large prey. He is believed to take fish and small animals (frogs, lizards, etc.) Most accounts of consuming larger mammals are probably carrion or a fresh natural death.




posted on Nov, 8 2005 @ 02:35 AM
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Originally posted by niato007


Would Bigfoot have dominance over the territory or would he fall prey to Bears likw we do? I guess what i'm asking is would Bigfoot easliy kill a grizzly or Black Bear? Or is it at the top of the food chain?


I think bigfoot as described would lose big time to a large Brown bear lets say a exceptional male 10' from nose to tail and weighing 1,100 pounds. No contest when fighting a 7-9 foot ape. Bears are just so strong and fast (35 miles per hour) for a short distance. PLus they have much better weapons for killing then any ape 3-4 inch claws and big old teeth.

Black bears are pretty small anything that was 7-9ft tall say 500-600 pounds would have little to fear from a black bear. Well maybe a female defending cubs.



posted on Nov, 8 2005 @ 07:05 AM
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Originally posted by Gemwolf

Originally posted by IXRAZORXI321

You must not be much of a hunter.I have nearly stepped on small dear in the woods. There instincts when scared are to lay down and hide. As they get older they will learn to run. I have walked to within 20 yards of larges bucks while they fed on my bait pile. I would say they can do it easily if there where 2or3 working together.
It would be extremely easy to locate there bedding spots and attack them at night. They make trails right to them any idiot could follow it.


There's a huge difference between an adult deer an a baby deer. Yes, the young ones depend on their camouflage because they cannot outrun predators. But there is no way in hell anyone can sneak up to a deer - close enough to grab it. Lions, leopards, etc. are some of the best hunters that do some sneaking during the hunt but it just don’t work that way. There's always some amount/degree of chasing.
The only animals I know that can sneak up are insects (and some fish) with camouflage - with a limited rate of success, and crocs for obvious reasons.

If Bigfoot is a predator - deer would know him as that, and would run at the first whiff of his smell. Maybe if he's got some sort of camouflage method?

I still don't agree that Bigfoot is a predator or a carnivore for that matter.


The bigfoot I saw had reflective lenses in his eyes. He can see the same way a deer can. Being able to see the same way as his prey would give him camo abilities we don't have. His smell would most likely be covered the same way a dog does by rolling in every smell they find.

sorry for the typos. I had just a few minutes to type and didn't reread it. I spelled deer dear a few times.lmao



posted on Nov, 8 2005 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by IXRAZORXI321

The bigfoot I saw had reflective lenses in his eyes. He can see the same way a deer can. Being able to see the same way as his prey would give him camo abilities we don't have. His smell would most likely be covered the same way a dog does by rolling in every smell they find.



I hadn't thought about this until your post reminded me, but deer and elk can see into the near-infra-red range of the spectrum, above the wavelengths of human (and presumably primates like sasquatch) vision. This is near infrared, not thermal. How this would affect the interaction of the two species is somewhat speculative.



posted on Nov, 8 2005 @ 11:34 PM
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I'm just going by what I saw. Bigfoot's eyes lit up in my headlights just like a deer. (Yes it was bigfoot.) This leads me to believe he can see like the deer can.

Think about this. Why do hunters wear bright orange when hiding in the woods?



posted on Nov, 9 2005 @ 01:23 AM
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Originally posted by IXRAZORXI321
I'm just going by what I saw. Bigfoot's eyes lit up in my headlights just like a deer. (Yes it was bigfoot.) This leads me to believe he can see like the deer can.

Think about this. Why do hunters wear bright orange when hiding in the woods?


Hunters wear orange in order for other hunters to spot them. For safety purposes, and it has very little to do with camo and the eyes of wild animals (Although many people believe it to be a fact that deer can't see orange like this site, but I'm very skeptical about this). If you want to be "invisible" to some animals such as deer, you'll have to get yourself some of that blue camo's. (Personally I don't buy this theory either, but they say it works that way...)

Secondly - concerning the reflection from Bigfoot's eyes ("Bigfoot's eyes lit up in my headlights") and this statement...


Originally posted by IXRAZORXI321
The bigfoot I saw had reflective lenses in his eyes. He can see the same way a deer can. Being able to see the same way as his prey would give him camo abilities we don't have.


...would mean that Bigfoot is most probably a nocturnal animal.

Tapetum lucidum, Latin for “bright carpet,” is an extra layer of mirror-like, reflective tissue found behind the animal eye’s inner back area ( retina) where light-sensitive cells are found and images are processed.

The tapetum lucidum makes the very best use of even the dimmest of light sources by reflecting unabsorbed light back into the retina. This enhances the animal’s ability to see in the dark.

This reflective layer of the eye is more common in nocturnal animals adapted for night hunting, or who need to depend on keen night vision for survival. Certain underwater creatures such as dolphins also have the eye structure, enabling them to see in low lighting of deep water.

Depending on the different types of pigment found in the animal eye, you might see different colors shining back at you. The green glow is typical of deer, dogs, and cats, whereas a crocodile has a chilling red “eye shine.” (This should not be confused with the "red eye" effect with humans when flash photography is used...)

It would be interesting to know what colour Bigfoot's eyes was?

Anyway, the point was that Bigfoot's vision has nothing to do with his camoflage or hunting abilities, other than the probability that he may be a night hunter - should he be a predator. (I'm still not convinced of this!)



posted on Nov, 9 2005 @ 12:08 PM
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His eyes were green to yellow reflective. The same as a deer. I suspect many people have see these eyes at night but were not close enough as I was to see what they were. I caught him crossing the road in front of me. He was barely 5O feet from the truck. He just walked across the road at a good pace. I would say exactly the same pace as the patterson film. He turned and looked into the headlights and then dissapeared into the state park. He looked exactly like the one in the patterson film

If he(bigfoot) can see the way his prey can see then he will be aware of what they look for. Just like bright orange sticks out like a sore thumb to us in the woods. Standing near a certain bush or tree may hide you better from their site than we can perceive with our eyes. Simply sitting motionless may make you invisible against the proper background. Take a black light for example. Some things appear bright white that can't even be seen under normal light. How do we know they can't see uv light as well?

Anyway back to the point. If I were hunting humans I would not wear bright orange for camo because I know it shows up well. If bigfoot can see like a deer he will know how to disguise himself. That alone would make deer easy prey.



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