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Car company playing with the weather

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posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 12:39 AM
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Found an interesting artickle on another site thought you all might find it interisting.
Nissan motors plays god

If this is so affective how big of cannon would we need for say a huricane?




posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 01:30 AM
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If this is so affective how big of cannon would we need for say a huricane?



I am just curious if you read your own article. This thing would have absolutely no effect on a hurricane. At the most all it supposedly does is to keep the water particles in motion to keep them from freezing into balls of hail. It does nothing to stop the storm or to even change the storms direction. Even then they state at the end that there is NO scientific research showing that these things even work…




Hail cannons, which cost $40,000 to $50,000 apiece, look like long medieval horns aimed straight up at the sky. Using acetylene fuel, ignited by a spark plug when Doppler radar warns of hail conditions, they emit blasts that send sound waves spiraling 20,000 feet into the sky. The theory – not accepted by everyone – is that moving the water droplets prevents them from freezing into hail.





But is it science or snake oil?
Harold Brooks, a research meteorologist at the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration's Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, Okla., is well aware of hail cannons. They have been used in various forms for more than a century, though there is no scientific foundation behind them.



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