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TERRORISM: FBI says Sorry, Wrong Number

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posted on Oct, 1 2005 @ 12:04 PM
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The FBI acknowledged yesterday it at times gets its wires crossed while performing wiretaps under the Patriot Act provisions due to expire in December. The information was revealed in a recent Justice Department report.
 



aolsvc.news.aol.com
FBI Admits Mistakes in Security Wiretaps

Patriot Act Critics Troubled by Errors Made During Terrorism Probes

By MARK SHERMAN, AP

WASHINGTON (Sept. 30) - The FBI says it sometimes gets the wrong number when it intercepts conversations in terrorism investigations, an admission critics say underscores a need to revise wiretap provisions in the Patriot Act.

The FBI would not say how often these mistakes happen. And, though any incriminating evidence mistakenly collected is not legally admissible in a criminal case, there is no way of knowing whether it is used to begin an investigation.




Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


I think we need to really take a hard look at these PA provisions and ensure they not only do the job they are intended to do, but also assure the law-abiding, non-terrrorist, citizen type is shielded from potential abuses.

We must protect the basic freedoms we take for granted in this country, or basically, the terrorists win by default, and we are no better than them.



[edit on 1-10-2005 by Icarus Rising]

[edit on 1-10-2005 by Icarus Rising]




posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 08:24 AM
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I don't get why they've admitted it? Surely it would have been a lot easier to just keep the mistakes hush hush.



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 08:28 AM
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Originally posted by phixion
I don't get why they've admitted it? Surely it would have been a lot easier to just keep the mistakes hush hush.


I wondered the same thing..

They get thier wire's crossed? More like their computer software monitoring all communications records stuff it shouldnt.



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 08:35 AM
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The article said they don't have dedicated circuits like they did in the old days, and with digital technology, multiple calls can now be carried on what amounts to the same 'line'. Their equipment isn't sensitive enough or calibrated properly or whatever to pick out only the targeted transmission. At least that was how they explained it.



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 09:00 AM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising
The article said they don't have dedicated circuits like they did in the old days, and with digital technology, multiple calls can now be carried on what amounts to the same 'line'. Their equipment isn't sensitive enough or calibrated properly or whatever to pick out only the targeted transmission. At least that was how they explained it.


The article is a little incorrect I feel. I work in a Voice fault capacity for a large Telecoms firm in the UK.

A normal telephone line (PSTN) will be a 64k circuit, which is about the right bandwidth needed to transmit human voice traffic.

Even when it reaches the exchange, that PSTN line will go into the switch and be pushed out either on a IMT (intermachine trunk) to another switch in the network, or if going to another network, via an interconnect.

Even when going down large "trunks" that can have a quite a large bandwidth, the "call" is presented on one 64k channel. That is how all circuits are built, from 64k upwards.

It shouldn't be too difficult to single out one channel and "eavesdrop", providing you have access to the switches.

The very nature of switched telephony needs a "circuit" to be established from point a to point b, That is how the call is transmitted.

They are making up a load of bull if they are blaming it on "digital" technology, as it should make it easier.

What they have done is listened to the wrong channel due to someone being a monkey. Failing listening to a call at the exchange level, it is as simple as connecting a phone into the copper cable that connects the phone to the DP/exchange. You could probably connect a speaker up to the twisted copper pairs and listen to the call that way.

Not rocket science folks. DMS switching has been around for donkeys and the PSTN even longer.....

Plus, from the property to the exchange (or DP, I forget which), a normal PSTN line would be analogue anyway.



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 09:02 AM
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The problems is that the comunications air waves belong to the private sector.

People no longer are track by a single telephone line, some families have multiple lines to their celluars and they do not used the old line hook to their homes anymore unless is for internet access.

I have three accounts with different names in my home two independant cellular companies and the old fashion phone line.

At the end of the month I am going to get rid of my old primary line and get another cellular attach to my daughters account.

Now I need to figure out how to get my Internet.




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