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Tropical Activity - Effects on Northern Hemisphere

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posted on Sep, 5 2005 @ 07:23 PM
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This is a question for the weather enthusiasts rather than a post.

Lots of humidity is being brought into the northern hemisphere by all of this activity which means moisture and heat, does that mean a mild winter?

Or does all that moisture from increased hurricane and typhoon activiy mean deeper snow cover this year?

What about all of the energy... bigger storms?

Is there even a correlation?

OK so I had more than one question...

Just wondering if I'm to expect and prepare for a really rough winter.
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edit: title fix

[edit on 9/5/2005 by Gools]




posted on Sep, 5 2005 @ 08:05 PM
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I think it means increased snowfall. 1989 was a good example with a late season storm brinigng record snows to the Ohio Valley in mid/late October. It may have been a fluke but when a 100+ year average for snow in a city is something like 0.1" for the MONTH of October and you get nearly 10" in a day it should tell you something.



posted on Sep, 8 2005 @ 12:11 PM
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Originally posted by Indy
I think it means increased snowfall.


That's what I'm expecting too.

Looks like someone took this idea a little further: www.abovetopsecret.com...
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posted on Sep, 8 2005 @ 12:48 PM
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It definitely means increased lake effect snow falls as the Great Lakes get an extra pump of warm water from the hurricane remnants along with the SW winds that we've seen a lot of this summer. The warmer the lakes are going into winter the longer they take to freeze. The longer they stay unfrozen the more moisture the prevailing NW winter winds can pick up to dump downwind as snow.



posted on Sep, 8 2005 @ 12:52 PM
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If I'm not mistaken a busy hurricane season in the Atlantic is usually correlated with a cold winter in the N.E. U.S./Canada while a mild hurricane season is correlated with a mild winter...I think it's all part of the global weather pattern/southern oscillation/el niño cycle.

[edit on 9/8/2005 by djohnsto77]



posted on Sep, 8 2005 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by titian
It definitely means increased lake effect snow falls as the Great Lakes get an extra pump of warm water ... the more moisture the prevailing NW winter winds can pick up to dump downwind as snow.


Sounds like the golden triangle (Southern Ontario) and the St-Lawrence River valley all the way out to the Maritimes could be hit hard. The geography acts like a funnel.

I expect heavy rains in Vancouver from all of the Typhoon activity. Less landfall effects from those since the storms always dissipate over the Pacific and the extra humidity falls as rain running into the Rockies.

You don't hear much about El'Nina and El'Nino anymore. Did that cycle break down? I had the impression that the frequency between the two events were converging.
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posted on Sep, 8 2005 @ 01:35 PM
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I can't for the life of me figure what we're in right now, El Nino or La Nina.

But not only will the continental US be affected this winter, I think from now we can already see the left over remnants of these tropical systems become extratropical and affect Europe.



posted on Sep, 8 2005 @ 02:52 PM
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Wasn't the alleged "slight" el nino supposed to end this spring/summer?

Link: www.noaanews.noaa.gov...


NOAA declared today that El Niño is back but this time around in a weaker state. "El Niño conditions have developed in the tropical Pacific and are expected to last through early 2005," said Jim Laver, director of the NOAA Climate Prediction Center. "At this time it is not clear what, if any, impacts this event will have on ocean temperatures in the classical El Niño region along the west coast of South America and on temperature and precipitation in the United States."



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