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Antarctica

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posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 09:40 AM
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I often go to weather underground to see what the weather is like all over. I have been watching Antarctica for about a year now. I was looking at it this morning and noticed that there is an area exceding 40 degrees (the scale only goes to 40 deg F, after that it is white). There are not any stations in this area to find out what the exact tem is, so all I know is it is over 40 deg and the heat index is in the 60's. They are in the middle of winter there. I have not heard of these kind of temps here before even in their summer. I know that there is a volcano but have not been able to find any satelite images. Does anyone know of a website where I can look at satelite images of the area?

My National Geographic Atlas says this about the area I am speaking of:


THE LONGEST WINTER Over hundreds of thousands of square miles of high plateau, the sunless cold of winter lasts from April through September. From beginning to end of the season temperatures average minus 80 degrees F.



Here is the links that show the temps:

Temps
www.wunderground.com...

heat index
www.wunderground.com...





posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 09:50 AM
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Probably not. The issue with these satellites is that they can't be set up on a geosynchronous orbit, to "hover" over an area. So they have to collect images on flybys.

I don't think you'll get as good data from the satellites as from ground stations, and they only reach so far. So I think you may find images, yes, but not "within the past 10 hours" current ones.



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 10:04 AM
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Well, after looking into it a bit more, I have found no volcano in that area. Any other ideas as to what could cause such extream temps? It is blowing my mind. I can't think of anything other than a volcano or a nuke that would cause these kind of temps in Antarctica. There is no known volcano in that area, and why would anyone want to nuke Antarctica. I just cant think of why in one area of Antarctica it is so warm and not too far away it is -80 to -100. This is totaly bizzar!



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 12:06 PM
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The white area isn't a warm spot, its an area of missing data. Nothing special is going on other than missing data from the sats.



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by Quest
The white area isn't a warm spot, its an area of missing data. Nothing special is going on other than missing data from the sats.


I know that the white blocked out part is missing data. I am talking about the pink/white area within the red circle. That is the area that is/was over 40 degrees with a heat index in the 60's.

I wish I had posted the link of the heat index.

The temps were only that high for a little while. It is now -20 in this area. Which leads me to believe either a large meteor or some sort of bomb struck that area. There is nothing else that could have caused it....that I know of.

One more thing. The only way that there could have been a heat index is if there was humidity. Antarctica is the driest place on earth. SO, what ever caused that approx 120 degree climb in tems in that short amount of time, melted the ice in that area.

[edit on 25-7-2005 by mrsdudara]



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 12:38 PM
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Oh snap! I'm so used to seeing people make a big deal out of data effects i missed the actual data! (ATS is rotting my brain!)

That is is something huge if that data is right. I used to work for NASA/JPL on weather sats and have never seen antartica that warm.

Look at the rate of change too!

I'm going to guess freak weather event or meteor hit. But a meteor hit that big would have set off siesmographs...so, just FREAK weather.



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 12:55 PM
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What on earth could cause that sort of reading?

A burst of cosmic radiation maybe? An 80+ degree shift would be one hell of a burst...

Couldn't have been an icequake, because the seismos would pick that up right?

Data anomaly maybe? Just a sensor glitch, or a bug in the interpretive sofware?

I can't think of too many natural explanations for the phenomenon, and I don't think I'm alone in that.

Do you suppose this event will give credence to the folks who think theres an alien coverup going on there?



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 12:57 PM
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Originally posted by Quest
Oh snap! I'm so used to seeing people make a big deal out of data effects i missed the actual data! (ATS is rotting my brain!)






I just emailed our local meteorologist. Hopefully he will answer back by tomorow. He usually does.

If it was a meteor,
because the size of the area is about the size of Missouri. I wonder if it was hotter than that. Maybe I caught the end of something bigger. Even so, if it was a meteor, I am glad it hit there with the heat wave we have been having, it would have reached 225 deg. easy.



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 01:11 PM
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cdiac.esd.ornl.gov...

This link might prove helpful. It will point you in the direction of a number of resources, should you wish to pursue this question.



If you have long distance telephone service, you can even contact the monitoring stations and ask them what's up. I doubt they get many calls.

Although if this is for real, their phones are probably ringing off the hook.



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 01:36 PM
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this is where some may talk of a underground instalation or hollow earth so 'ill just through in a random fact


antarctica is the stormeist place on earth



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 01:45 PM
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As clear as i can tell... there is nothing unusual...

check the map now...
it is showing -60thru -20F over the whole continent...... which is normal...

maybe it was just a computer glitch...

or maybe you warned someone of a data leak...

heat index is the same... -50 throughout most of the observable region...

whats the biggie?



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by LazarusTheLong
whats the biggie?


It was not like that this morning. It was over 40 deg with heat index in the 60's this morning. Then it went back to normal. A fluxuation in temps of approx 120 degrees, in that short of time is a big deal.



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 08:12 PM
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Welp the hot spot is back again, though it is a little further east this time, and a little bigger.





This time I saved the map showing the heat index



What on earth could be causing this?



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 08:15 PM
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You might be on to something here...

I can't figure out what it could be, and I've been pondering it all day.

The only two explanations that sound halfway plausible in my head are sensor/software anomaly, or cosmic radiation storm.

Either that, or the Aliens Vs. Predator movie was for real!



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 08:31 PM
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Well, beings that the areas are the same oval shape and with in an hour or so it goes back down to normal temps, I hate to say it but it looks like someone is testing something. They banned all military testing in Antarctica, so it is hard to say who is doing the testing, but it looks kind of obvious what they are testing. I really hope not, but I can not think of what else would cause this.

[edit on 25-7-2005 by mrsdudara]

[edit on 25-7-2005 by mrsdudara]



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 01:42 AM
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could it be a hole in the ozone layer or is it too big?



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 02:08 AM
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Originally posted by Byrd
Probably not. The issue with these satellites is that they can't be set up on a geosynchronous orbit, to "hover" over an area. So they have to collect images on flybys.

I don't think you'll get as good data from the satellites as from ground stations, and they only reach so far. So I think you may find images, yes, but not "within the past 10 hours" current ones.


Uh, stationary satellites are abundant. To think that every single sattelite has to run in flybys is just wrong.

There are many satellites that hover over a given location.



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 02:37 AM
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Originally posted by AlienAntFarm
There are many satellites that hover over a given location.


Yes, but they're all poised over the equator and 20-some thousand miles up. That's the only way to do it.

EDIT: And I'm going to have to say this is some sort of senor glitch. That or it's picking up the thermal radiation from the aurora.

Don't believe that that's what it is? Here's an image of the aurora over the north pole:



The ring is the aurora, started in the center and moved outwards. The band to the left is daylight. Obviously this is a different type of image, that isn't displaying thermal radiation, but you get my drift.


[edit on 7/26/2005 by cmdrkeenkid]



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 02:38 AM
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but it looks kind of obvious what they are testing.


And that would be what exactly?
Nukes?
Lasers?
Weather control?


I agree, this is very strange.



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 03:43 AM
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cmdr
It's not really 'from' the aurora, right? It would be from the cosmic radiation that causes the aurora, no?

I thought about that, but even a heavy blast of rads shouldn't cause a 120 degree temp shift, unless there's a total lack of atmospheric protection...

This has got me thinking...

[edit on 26-7-2005 by WyrdeOne]



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