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where would the most likely place for life be in our solar system?

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posted on May, 17 2005 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by junglejake
Drag! I was hoping you didn't include that Earth exception. Then I could show up and be all snide and sarcastic and say life would most likely be found on Earth. However, you caught that and prevented me from doing that. So instead, I'm going to retreate to my cubicle and have a good cry.


Funny stuff


I was going to go with the your anus thing but that would just be rude and crude.

On a more somber note. I would have to agree with all the above. It seems likely that life (in whatever form) could be found almost anywhere so long as we stop putting limits on what "life" is. Could we find crystals that communicate on some level? What about the thought of "invisible to the naked eye" beings. I mean really, why are we limiting ourselves to things we can see?



apc

posted on May, 17 2005 @ 06:19 PM
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I mean really, why are we limiting ourselves to things we can see?

Because all we've ever known is life that in one way or another used visible light (from the Sun) as a source of energy.
The problem that arises when expanding the definition of life to include crystals and other seemingly inanimate objects, is that even if it was determined that the crystals had some sort of exchange of information going on, how could we determine if that was actual conscious communication or merely chemical reaction?
Defining life really is a problem, because by many aspects my computer is alive, my tv remote, the dead bird in my driveway... hrm I should probably clean that up... anyway yeah this does pose a bit of a problem when it comes time for us to look at the giant cloud of gas propelling itself straight for Earth... is it alive? If it is, why does it want to eat us?
We wont really know until we have some strange artifact sitting in a lab that cant be identified until it eats a scientist.



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 09:32 AM
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There are two places I would deem worthy to send expeditions to in order to find any non-earth based biologicall entities. We may find life on Mars, but what if this life is originated from Earth by some sort of imaginable way? Does that count?

Besides that, here are my two theories:

You will find life in the most unlikely of places: the sun. Here lies a hot bed of radiation, fussion, and heat heat heat. You wouldn't expect to find anything in here, other than a life form so advanced it is able to adapt to the sun and feed off of its unstable fussion reactions by some how creating a cypher to make it identifiably rythmic. Could this be the home of our overlords, Jebus, or John Tesh?

You will find life in the most likely of places: a comet. Here lies a hot bed of potential life. Having ventured through much of the solar systems in our galaxies and collected minute samples of water on the way in mass accumulation, it is very well feasible that a life form does exist in such an environment. This would have to call for the passing of the comet through our solar system for such a thing to occur.



 
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