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Is Binary Computer code 0 1's the same globally

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posted on May, 10 2005 @ 09:49 PM
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Can any one help me out here .

I have question - when i type on my PC no matter what i type it ends up as 1s & 0s eventually right at processor level ?

Is this the same globally as in for example :
If i typed AMERICA and it was equal to 111011100111
Would this be the same code if i was to type AMERICA on a chinese computer (or there eqivilant) or a Russian system would it be the same seqence of 1s and 0s

Just curious if Binary is the same globally ?




posted on May, 10 2005 @ 09:52 PM
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No getting away from it, 1 = on and 0 = off, wherever you go.

But the numbers spiral down the sinkhole in the opposite direction down south.



posted on May, 10 2005 @ 10:19 PM
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Originally posted by andersonr
Just curious if Binary is the same globally ?


That's one of the reasons why computers are so awesome - the understand each other. You don't have language barriers, any computer can talk to any other computer and uses the same basic programming system to run. It's fantastic.



posted on May, 10 2005 @ 10:28 PM
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Originally posted by MaskedAvatar
But the numbers spiral down the sinkhole in the opposite direction down south.




andersonr,
Yes binary is always just binary but your example of America is taking things out of step a bit. Binary is just a 2-state system. AMERICA is the result of using Multiple Binary States being converted to an Alphanumeric State. So using your example of AMERICA, the binary number 111011100111 will be the same because that exact set of binary digits will always be the same Number based on the way Binary Numbers work. However, that number value may or may not be translated into AMERICA alphanumerically depending upon the Character Set Used. ASCII is a Standard Set for example. For the most part everyone uses the same Compatible Code, after all the purpose is greater functionality at such a base level of system operation. However, that only continues to be true if it is set to that Standard.

Example:
Binary:
0001 = 1
0010 = 2
0100 = 4
etc.

So as long as the Coded set has A=1, B=2 and so on then that is their value. You can have A=3, B=5 or whatever if you want to though.



posted on May, 11 2005 @ 01:43 PM
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well i have to add something here,

while it's true, that today all computers are depending on the binary system ( 1 = high voltage, 0 = low voltage), it's not quite true that all computers nativly understand each other. the so called "byteorder" and encoding types play a significant role here.
there are differences on certain systems, for example a intel x86 compatible cpu uses the little endian system, while many workstations (motorola, sparcs, etc. ) use the exact opposite, the big endian system. if you would try to exchange data between 2 of these systems, they will NOT understand each other, without a conversion from one system into the other.



When integers or any other data are represented with multiple bytes, there is no unique way of ordering those bytes in memory or in transmission over some medium, so the order is subject to arbitrary convention, called endianness. This is actually somewhat similar to the situation in different written languages, where some are written left-to-right, while others are written right-to-left.

The two main types of endianness are termed big-endian and little-endian. Endianness is also referred to as byte order or byte sex. There seems to be no significant advantage in using one way over the other; the endianness does not matter when dealing with a sequence of single bytes. This is the case with strings encoded in ASCII and similar codes, where each byte corresponds to a single character. Strings encoded with unicode UTF-16 or UTF-32 are affected by endianness, because each set of two or four bytes represents a single character.


from : en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 12 2005 @ 12:04 AM
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The two main types of endianness are termed big-endian and little-endian. Endianness is also referred to as byte order or byte sex.




It seems the systems programmers of the day had droll humor and were sexually frustrated.

Q. How can you tell an extroverted systems engineer?
A. He looks at your shoes when he talks to you, rather than his.

Droll, I say. Droll.




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