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Answer This, Please. . .

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posted on May, 23 2020 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: Lazarus Short

My wife and I were camping in Bavaria. A wild strawberry plant grew right by our tent. It in had one strawberry. We are it the morning we left, and felt so cool eating a wild strawberry for breakfast!




posted on May, 23 2020 @ 05:31 PM
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OP, simple -- we crossbred the crap out of the dinky-yield wild stuff to get the large-yielding domesticated crops we know today. I wouldn't put them in the same class of GMO as ones crossed in labs with animal or insect DNA, though, but it was (and is still in use & thus is) an early example of GMO crop experimentation.

Take, for example, the wild bitter watermelons of Africa -- they're juicy, but horribly bitter. But after ages of cultivation and crossing them, we have countless varieties of the modern summer fruit snack staple everyone knows.

Or, for even better understanding, look up corn/maize. Ears of corn used to be about an inch long many millennia ago. Get out your tape measure and measure your next ear of corn at dinner, and think about how tiny that corn's ancestors used to be and how far it's come from there!


originally posted by: Lazarus Short
I recall that apple trees grow wild in Kazakhstan, the region from which they originated.


And the capital of Almaty is derived from the Kazakh root word for apples, "alma". I believe it's a root work for it in several Turkic languages, too.
The oldest known ancestral variety is still grown today in the Almaty region -- Malus Sieversii
edit on 5/23/2020 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)


Edit: Also, the food staples we eat today are from all OVER the world, so the odds of stumbling across that Kazakh ancestral apple variety is nil to none elsewhere outside that country.
Corn is from the Americas along with peppers, potatoes, and tomatoes.
Oranges likely originated in China out of a cross between two citrus fruits -- a Mandarin Orange (but the Mandarin fruit name has nothing to do with it, that has French origins) and a Pomelo (native to SE Asia) I say "likely originated" in China because the earliest mentions of oranges were about 1700 years ago, in China.
The earliest peas found seem to have originated in Greece, but it's "zone" was probably the eastern Mediterranean and Near East (i.e Turkey/Iran) in general.


I could keep going, but I hope you get the idea that thanks to crossbreeding and global cultivation, we're literally eating a global diet anymore.
edit on 5/23/2020 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



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