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anti-microbe properties of tonic water and Gin

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posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 08:13 PM
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I myself do not like the taste of a gin and tonic but with the current data, it makes me wonder what the British know about one of their favorite drinks? It is strongly anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory if you examine the ingredients and their known medicinal properties it is easy to see that a gin and tonic is a very good thing to drink when far from home.

Chloroquine is just what it sounds like a chlorine molecule attached to quinine making tonic water anti-viral. The anti-viral capacity of this is widely known. Gin, of course, is a weak extract of juniper berry. This is well known to be anti-inflammatory, and anti-fungal, and anti-bacterial. Of course, this is all in an alcohol base. Very clever ancient British alchemist.


edit on 4/5/2020 by machineintelligence because: entry error




posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: machineintelligence

If this is the case, my body will never rot ...



posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 08:19 PM
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a reply to: machineintelligence

Yeah. And don't forget the lime.
Good for scurvy, don't you know.



posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 08:22 PM
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I knew there was a reason I was compelled to buy a large bottle of lemon gin.
Looks like I'm covered.



posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 08:25 PM
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I'm willing to go ahead and take one for the team and go buy a bottle of Vodka and see how that works out for me. Don't worry tho, because it's for medical research purposes ONLY.



posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 08:33 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: machineintelligence

Yeah. And don't forget the lime.
Good for scurvy, don't you know.


Stave off the scurvy with the lime!

I swear on gin and tonics in the summer to keep the mosquitoes from suckin’ on me, provided I drink enough of it!



posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: machineintelligence






posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 09:15 PM
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I got a nice big bottle of Indian tonic water today like the first in years, then I discovered I'd have to drink around 20litres for the quinine to have any effect at all by which time I'd be like a helium balloon!! I don't drink fizzy stuff, was a shock to my system I can tell you!



posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: PhyllidaDavenport

It is a tough adjustment to drink 24 hours a day for sure no matter the beverage.



posted on Apr, 5 2020 @ 10:55 PM
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Coffee has quinine in it too. some people mention on a site I visited of people who experienced this disease that they made coffee out of tonic water. they thought they may have had a milder version because of that but were not sure. A couple of people on that site said they had some salt water and it seemed to help right away, but then followed with a disclaimer because they wanted to make sure people would not blame him/her if they had side effects of the increase of salt. Salt can help to reduce a problem with cytokine storms, it has immune system dampening properties.

Too much salt can make you actually more prone to disease, keeping it in a moderate range is good. Sodium levels go down with diaretics making you more apt to get autoimmune complications. Most blood tests test for levels in the blood, it should stay about in the middle of the range.



posted on Apr, 6 2020 @ 04:59 AM
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originally posted by: PhyllidaDavenport
I got a nice big bottle of Indian tonic water today like the first in years, then I discovered I'd have to drink around 20litres for the quinine to have any effect at all by which time I'd be like a helium balloon!! I don't drink fizzy stuff, was a shock to my system I can tell you!

I am glad you found this. If you could post the link to the research paper(s), that would be great.
Thanks in advance!



posted on Apr, 6 2020 @ 05:35 AM
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To my knowledge only Indian tonic water has quinine in it
I CANNOT imagine making a cuppa with tonic water...gross

a reply to: rickymouse



posted on Apr, 6 2020 @ 06:14 AM
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originally posted by: PhyllidaDavenport
To my knowledge only Indian tonic water has quinine in it
I CANNOT imagine making a cuppa with tonic water...gross

a reply to: rickymouse


We have a few types around here that I know of, the Seagrams and Schwepps. We may have others, but I saw these two in the grocery stores and liquor stores before.

I do not know how it would taste myself. I think you would need more sugar in it and I do not like too much sugar in my coffee. Medium roast coffee has enough in it if you drink five or six cups, but remember, the side effects of too much coffee could be the same as the side effects of chloroquinone if you drink more. I can drink five cups of weaker coffee a day, but weaker coffee, not at the strength they state on the can per cup. Yes, too much coffee can give a person a heart attack.



posted on Apr, 6 2020 @ 06:55 AM
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originally posted by: PhyllidaDavenport
To my knowledge only Indian tonic water has quinine in it
I CANNOT imagine making a cuppa with tonic water...gross

a reply to: rickymouse


Even the generic tonic water varieties sold in the grocery stores here are labeled, "Contains Quinine".



posted on Apr, 6 2020 @ 07:29 AM
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Why Gin and Tonic..?
Why not something palatable like whiskey?

*Holds nose and downs a G&T*

I bet you could boil down tonic water and be left with a potent quinine mixture?



posted on Apr, 6 2020 @ 08:07 AM
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originally posted by: PhyllidaDavenport
To my knowledge only Indian tonic water has quinine in it
I CANNOT imagine making a cuppa with tonic water...gross

a reply to: rickymouse



And Indian tonic water makes a MUCH better G&T! I only discovered this "real" tonic water a few years ago after previously only finding the typical commercial tonics. I will never have a Gin & Schweppe's again!



posted on Apr, 6 2020 @ 12:19 PM
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Gin is actually a Dutch invention:

"Gin emerged in England after the introduction of the jenever, a Dutch and Belgian liquor which originally had been a medicine"

The earliest known written reference to jenever appears in the 13th-century encyclopaedic work Der Naturen Bloeme (Translated: The nature of flowers), with the earliest printed recipe for jenever dating from 16th-century work Een Constelijck Distileerboec (Translated: A discription of destillation).

In there it was called: "Aqua Juniperi"
edit on 6-4-2020 by EartOccupant because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2020 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: machineintelligence


But, but I like the taste of Vodka better!



posted on Apr, 6 2020 @ 06:48 PM
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Copious amounts of scotch is great for curing headaches.

Medicinal purposes only!



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: dogstar23

Do you get that Fever Tree brand? It is so expensive online.



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