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So... can “quarantine” ever actually end?

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posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 12:12 PM
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I read an article out of Italy warning the US and other countries who are “a few days to a few weeks” behind Italy in terms of virus progression to head the quarantine advice. Stay home. Don’t go to public places. Minimize travel anywhere as much as possible.

Now, as they’re saying this being a few weeks ahead, the death toll in Italy has slowed.

www.worldometers.info...

But that got me thinking - does this actually ever end? When is it safe to get back in the pool so to speak?

Is it once a vaccine or “cure” is established? A globally accepted treatment regime that’s generally successful?

I say this as we have many illnesses/viruses/etc. that permeate society annually or in clusters - but we don’t shut down society over them....

So how do we walk this back? Can we with some many hyperbolic/freaked out people?




posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 12:16 PM
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The quarantine is there in the first place so the health care system doesn't crumble. They want to avoid the China scenario where they had to build hospitals in a week. No western country has that capacity.
Once your healthcare system goes down than the real apocalypse begins. A quarantine slows down the infux of patients that need medical attention.
edit on 15-3-2020 by XCrycek because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: XCrycek
The quarantine is there in the first place so the health care system doesn't crumble. They want to avoid the China scenario where they had to build hospitals in a week. No western country has that capacity.
Once your healthcare system goes down than the real apocalypse begins.


That’s the rationale for quarantine. I’ll buy that.

But that wasn’t the point of my question - can it ever actually end?



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 12:20 PM
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originally posted by: EnigmaChaser

originally posted by: XCrycek
The quarantine is there in the first place so the health care system doesn't crumble. They want to avoid the China scenario where they had to build hospitals in a week. No western country has that capacity.
Once your healthcare system goes down than the real apocalypse begins.


That’s the rationale for quarantine. I’ll buy that.

But that wasn’t the point of my question - can it ever actually end?


It will end eventually. Once enough people have developed an immunity against CoVid. When that will be is anyone's guess



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: XCrycek

originally posted by: EnigmaChaser

originally posted by: XCrycek
The quarantine is there in the first place so the health care system doesn't crumble. They want to avoid the China scenario where they had to build hospitals in a week. No western country has that capacity.
Once your healthcare system goes down than the real apocalypse begins.


That’s the rationale for quarantine. I’ll buy that.

But that wasn’t the point of my question - can it ever actually end?


It will end eventually. Once enough people have developed an immunity against CoVid. When that will be is anyone's guess


Normally I’d agree but the reality is most people don’t need “immunity” to the virus - they can fight it off like any other illness.

Therefore, your point doesn’t resonate from my perspective because we showed we’re willing to disrupt everything on the basis of “protecting” a very small percentage of society.

Plus, if those people who are susceptible DONT get it, they’ll theoretically forever require quarantine. So that means that - using the logic that’s deployed right now with shuttering most everything on the basis of a disease that kills fewer people than the flu - we’ll be stuck in quarantine for a really really long time.

Said another way, what’s the mechanism for it to end based on where we stand today?



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 05:03 PM
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originally posted by: EnigmaChaser
Said another way, what’s the mechanism for it to end based on where we stand today?

Simple: We'll just get used to it, just like we've gotten used to vehicle accidents, cancer, other viruses, etc.

Even if corona kills 100 million people this year... it will just barely make a dent in the world population and set us back a year. While growth rates are slowing down year to year, we're still squirting out babies like there's no tomorrow. In the last 20 years - the year 2000, man it feels like yesterday lol - we've added nearly 2 *BILLION* to the world population.

Sorry, just feeling pragmatic.
edit on 15-3-2020 by merka because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 05:32 PM
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originally posted by: merka

originally posted by: EnigmaChaser
Said another way, what’s the mechanism for it to end based on where we stand today?

Simple: We'll just get used to it, just like we've gotten used to vehicle accidents, cancer, other viruses, etc.

Even if corona kills 100 million people this year... it will just barely make a dent in the world population and set us back a year. While growth rates are slowing down year to year, we're still squirting out babies like there's no tomorrow. In the last 20 years - the year 2000, man it feels like yesterday lol - we've added nearly 2 *BILLION* to the world population.

Sorry, just feeling pragmatic.


I agree with you. But I don’t think people will be able to “just get used” to no social gatherings, no sporting events, no sports to participate in, no stores to buy goods, no restaurants, no bars, no movie theaters, etc.

Cabin fever will set in and people will start to resurface into the world. Then the question in my mind is - does the government force people back inside or let then go about their business.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: merka

originally posted by: EnigmaChaser
Said another way, what’s the mechanism for it to end based on where we stand today?

Simple: We'll just get used to it, just like we've gotten used to vehicle accidents, cancer, other viruses, etc.

Even if corona kills 100 million people this year... it will just barely make a dent in the world population and set us back a year. While growth rates are slowing down year to year, we're still squirting out babies like there's no tomorrow. In the last 20 years - the year 2000, man it feels like yesterday lol - we've added nearly 2 *BILLION* to the world population.

Sorry, just feeling pragmatic.


First of all if that is how you feel then I hope you are one of the first to lose a parent or other loved one so you might begin to understand what you are callously wishing upon the rest of humanity. Secondly first world countries that are primarily affected by this virus already have populations that don’t sustain their current populations.

The only counties ‘squirting out babies’ as you so eloquently put it are third world countries that can ill afford them. So, basically screw you and your indifference to other people and their loved ones and for spreading a false narrative.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 07:51 PM
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originally posted by: merka

originally posted by: EnigmaChaser
Said another way, what’s the mechanism for it to end based on where we stand today?

Simple: We'll just get used to it, just like we've gotten used to vehicle accidents, cancer, other viruses, etc.

Even if corona kills 100 million people this year... it will just barely make a dent in the world population and set us back a year. While growth rates are slowing down year to year, we're still squirting out babies like there's no tomorrow. In the last 20 years - the year 2000, man it feels like yesterday lol - we've added nearly 2 *BILLION* to the world population.

Sorry, just feeling pragmatic.

I think you've got a point there.
During the cabin fever phase, people will boink like rabbits (there WILL be a baby boom in 9-10 months, just you watch)
And at the same time, people will get used to not having as much to do outside of the home. We'll resort to being homebodies on a large scale, people will return to having actual home-side hobbies in their personal time.
I predict most would adapt just fine, having learned to relax and pull the Keep Up With The Joneses sticks out of their backsides for good.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 08:14 PM
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I'm sure as sh** not staying at home while this virus is floating about for the next month or year even, sorry. I'm desperate for money as is and not missing out on a single weeks wages. I know I'm not the only one with those thoughts and maybe we are the problem? I'm trying to survive and secure my future just like everyone else.

We haven't seen the worst of this, the worst is yet to come. THe virus will linger and it will end up being passed again after a quarantine has ended.

We haven't developed cure for common cold so a cure for the coronavirus isn't happening any time soon.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 08:14 PM
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NO, we're all dead.

But in the meantime, buy some more TP if it makes ya feel better.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: EnigmaChaser

They need it to go through enough people that most the people who are going to get it have already had it. So that if it comes back around, people have various levels of resistance to it unlike this specific time.

If you have 10,000 people who are going to get it, and 20% of them are going to get cases that need hospitalization, that's 2,000 who will need medical care to recover. There just aren't 2,000 available hospital beds in most communities. So they keep us spread apart to slow down how fast the 10,000 get sick so that 2,000 are spread out at a rate the hospitals can care for them with beds.

If the virus comes back, those 10,000 who had it before will have varying degree of resistance to it where some will be outright immune, and others who might get it won't do so easily, so it might take repeated exposures. And some who get it, might get so mildly as to be even less aware they had it than the first time around. But the end result is that it has a harder time finding people to spread to, so it's naturally slowed by herd immunity --something we don't have now. And the rate of infection never gets more than our health care system can handle.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: EnigmaChaser




Normally I’d agree but the reality is most people don’t need “immunity” to the virus - they can fight it off like any other illness.

What exactly do you think immunity means?
How do you think our bodies overcome infection of any sort?

Do you know what antibodies are?

edit on 3/15/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 10:05 PM
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They won’t be able to keep us quarantined forever, what the world looks like afterwards is the question. What new laws, controls activated etc. not to mention how the heck the healthcare system will look on an economical scale. There is allot to be paying attention to, that most are just focused on the panic and hysteria. Gonna be allot of unpaid medical bills out there For those that do not have socialized healthcare or Medicare or Medicaid or health insurance.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 10:53 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: EnigmaChaser




Normally I’d agree but the reality is most people don’t need “immunity” to the virus - they can fight it off like any other illness.

What exactly do you think immunity means?
How do you think our bodies overcome infection of any sort?

Do you know what antibodies are?


Since your question suggests you know the answer - define it for us.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 10:55 PM
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Yes.
Sadly most everyone will be dead by then.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 10:58 PM
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originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: merka

originally posted by: EnigmaChaser
Said another way, what’s the mechanism for it to end based on where we stand today?

Simple: We'll just get used to it, just like we've gotten used to vehicle accidents, cancer, other viruses, etc.

Even if corona kills 100 million people this year... it will just barely make a dent in the world population and set us back a year. While growth rates are slowing down year to year, we're still squirting out babies like there's no tomorrow. In the last 20 years - the year 2000, man it feels like yesterday lol - we've added nearly 2 *BILLION* to the world population.

Sorry, just feeling pragmatic.

I think you've got a point there.
During the cabin fever phase, people will boink like rabbits (there WILL be a baby boom in 9-10 months, just you watch)
And at the same time, people will get used to not having as much to do outside of the home. We'll resort to being homebodies on a large scale, people will return to having actual home-side hobbies in their personal time.
I predict most would adapt just fine, having learned to relax and pull the Keep Up With The Joneses sticks out of their backsides for good.


I don't think so.
Humans don't reproduce well in a stressful environment.



posted on Mar, 15 2020 @ 11:00 PM
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a reply to: EnigmaChaser

When an organism (you) is invaded by another organism (coronovirus, though you can debate whether a virus is an organism), the invaded organism begins to battle the invader by producing what is known as antibodies. This battle can be intense and produce effects such as fever and the production of fluid in the lungs.

Eventually, there are generally one of two outcomes. The antibodies of the organism succeed in eliminating the invaders (in which case one recovers from the illness) before the invaders overcome the organism, or they don't.

If one is immune, they will not contract the disease because they already possess the antibodies to defeat it and will eliminate the invaders when they first appear. That, in fact, is one of the problems with this virus, this is a new virus, no one has any immunity to it because no one has been exposed to it before.

When the population has recovered from the infection, it will be resistant to further infection because it now has a certain level of immunity to that organism. This is the basis of vaccination.

edit on 3/15/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2020 @ 01:04 AM
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originally posted by: Metallicus

originally posted by: merka

originally posted by: EnigmaChaser
Said another way, what’s the mechanism for it to end based on where we stand today?

Simple: We'll just get used to it, just like we've gotten used to vehicle accidents, cancer, other viruses, etc.

Even if corona kills 100 million people this year... it will just barely make a dent in the world population and set us back a year. While growth rates are slowing down year to year, we're still squirting out babies like there's no tomorrow. In the last 20 years - the year 2000, man it feels like yesterday lol - we've added nearly 2 *BILLION* to the world population.

Sorry, just feeling pragmatic.


First of all if that is how you feel then I hope you are one of the first to lose a parent or other loved one so you might begin to understand what you are callously wishing upon the rest of humanity. Secondly first world countries that are primarily affected by this virus already have populations that don’t sustain their current populations.

The only counties ‘squirting out babies’ as you so eloquently put it are third world countries that can ill afford them. So, basically screw you and your indifference to other people and their loved ones and for spreading a false narrative.

You seem to be projecting alot of hate against what is the reality of life. We cannot stop death anymore than we can instantly stop diseases, we can only do as much as we possibly can. Just pick any disastrous moment in history and they will have one thing in common - the world survived. This virus wont be the one to take us down unless it mutates into the zombie apocalypse.

Also fyi my mother died in cancer a couple of years back. Around 9 million die of it every year, yet there is no global panic and countries seem to sustain their population despite of it.
edit on 16-3-2020 by merka because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2020 @ 01:17 AM
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a reply to: Phage

How do you explain the second round of the spanish flu was worse than the first? I agree with everything you are saying, I honestly wonder what your thoughts are on that fact.

Thanks!



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