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"Hobbits" in Indonesia-- Can Leprechaun fossils be far behind?

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posted on Apr, 20 2005 @ 09:11 PM
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Narrow Darwinian minds beware...

Exactly.

After thinking about this for a while, I'm still amazed. Imagine if the human race were to flourish and genetically diversify in the same way the other primates have. Evolution has been observed in the study of fossilized primates, so obviously there is a huge gap on any island that has been landlocked for X number of years or evolutionary events.

I found this .gif animation of continental plate movemement at the link below:



www.enchantedlearning.com...

I noticed that the islands east of Java (in this animation anyway) lie on a different continental plate than Java and Sumatra. Also, I noticed that the Pink colored plate (Australia) breaks off from the mass continent around 80-90 million years ago. I don't know what this means, since it does seem likely that there have been watercraft (island-hopping vessels) for thousands of years, so why was floresiensis so isolated? The locals knew of them but when did they stop visiting? Perhaps floresiensis legends might be found among seagoing native australian tribes?

I saw on the History Channel that "Flat Faced Man" walked upright around 3.5 million years ago. If Abraham is supposed to have lived in 700 BC (and there are no egyptian records of any biblical person prior to 650 BC) yet due to this one skeleton, we now have to reappraise the last million or so years, isn't this find an indication that science has defeated religion, entirely?

At the link below, you can read more about how Wegener's brilliant theory of continental drift was fought by the scientific community from 1915 to the sixties.

www.ucmp.berkeley.edu...




posted on Jul, 21 2008 @ 12:30 AM
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While a smaller race of people may have existed, they are not hobbits per se. Not on the Tolkien-essque manner at least. There are diminutive ethnic groups in Africa right now, that are just maybe 5" over your average "hobbit" height, it's not unreasonable to think that "hobbit-sized" humans lived in the world at some point. Heck, we've had 12" high horses, at some point in our history.

I'd love the thought of actual hobbits, or other fantastical creatures, but I think anything that lived in our past is quite "normal" in an evolutionary scale.

Ah heck.. I hate being a killjoy. Yup.. I think hobbits lived on our planet in our past.. and I think that the Bagginses in particular, and probably living in a secluded hill in the countryside in Ireland or England, quite unconcerned about the outside world around them.



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