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Routine medical procedures - What exactly is "routine" and standard? Industry of death.

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posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 12:46 PM
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I am amazed at how many deaths there are from routine medical procedures from taking simple medications to having common surgeries. What I find most concerning about the statement "routine" is that everyone is unique in the way their body handled various chemicals and substances, some are more tolerant of chemicals while some are more "allergic", sometimes severely, to various chemicals and then we all have varying metabolic speeds, which can increase the sensitivity to these chemicals. Then we all have different medical conditions, diseases, disorders, etc, which all can effect the outcome of a "routine" procedure.

IMO, these deaths or incidences of severe long term disability from these routine procedures is a form of laziness, ignorance and general malpractice and this issue is being covered up by the AMA, FDA, and other medical related industries b/c if they didn't they would be liable for a lot more lawsuits.

If something is a "standard and routine" procedure, there should be no deaths from it, unless someone has another condition which causes death - like a brain aneurysm while having ingrown toe nail surgery - totally non related, but brain aneurysm was a pre-existing condition. If a death occurs then there must be malpractice, either from the procedure going wrong, or there wasn't enough tests done to find out what the patients "profile/conditions" were before the procedure.

Now medical industry will tell us it is too expensive to do these tests and it isn't cost effective to do these tests before procedures - so they are admitting that this is all profit driven. The reason it isn't cost effective is b/c they are shielded from lawsuits by labeling it as natural/normal side effects of the procedure (even if a low % have this - death) - so they can get away with murder. If they didnt' have this shield, then they would get sued for these deaths and it would become cost effective to do the tests before the procedures - saving a lot of lives per year - but how much would this cost and how much are these lives "worth"?




posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 12:57 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

I'm amazed at the sensationalist tripe you post. DigginForS&F yeah?



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: hombero
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

I'm amazed at the sensationalist tripe you post. DigginForS&F yeah?


I'm surprised you bother to reply. What does your post history look like. Do you contribute ANYTHING to the forum, all you do is make posts like this, pointless and with no substance.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 01:09 PM
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What deaths? You don't have a single example. You're just spitting venom here.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 01:21 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
What deaths? You don't have a single example. You're just spitting venom here.

Are you telling me that you've NEVER heard of these cases or seen examples of such? It isn't some obscure and unknown topic.

Why do some members feel they need to be spoon fed "examples" on topics. It's like the mindset "pictures or it didn't happen". So many members have less mental ability than young children, SMH..

If you can't be bothered to search anything, then don't bother replying.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 02:21 PM
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I recall an episode of New Amsterdam, a great medical drama show btw, in which it was said that deaths from medical mistakes were now the 3rd most significant in US, behind cancer and heart issues.
So now reading your thread peaked my interest so I dug a little and found this fairly quick.

Study Suggests Medical Errors Now Third Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.

According to the CDC, in 2013, 611,105 people died of heart disease, 584,881 died of cancer and 149,205 died of chronic respiratory disease — the top three causes of death in the U.S. The newly calculated figure for medical errors puts this cause of death behind cancer but ahead of respiratory disease.


In their study, the researchers examined four separate studies that analyzed medical death rate data from 2000 to 2008, including one by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Then, using hospital admission rates from 2013, they extrapolated that based on a total of 35,416,020 hospitalizations, 251,454 deaths stemmed from a medical error, which the researchers say now translates to 9.5 percent of all deaths each year in the U.S.

This caveat for perspective:

The researchers caution that most of medical errors aren’t due to inherently bad doctors, and that reporting these errors shouldn’t be addressed by punishment or legal action. Rather, they say, most errors represent systemic problems, including poorly coordinated care, fragmented insurance networks, the absence or underuse of safety nets, and other protocols, in addition to unwarranted variation in physician practice patterns that lack accountability.


It does sound significant in general, even though it is a single study. I know ff three people that contracted MRSA from a hospital session. One of the people had to get IV treatment because the MRSA went internal, which makes it more dangerous. I have seen the cases where gloves or instruments (RBS Retained Surgical Foreign Bodies after Surgery)are left inside body after surgery. There are about 4000 cases per year of this. I have seen cases where information on medical chart got mixed up. So yes, caution is a valid concern imo, not in a chicken little fashion, but as a general awareness.

It is too bad that this issue is destructive from both the side of patient and the side of doctors due to malpractice insurance. Have you read the liability relinquishment paperwork these days before a procedure. It basically says anything can happen and you are being operated on at your own risk, to a significant degree. Scammers surely are part of the problem no doubt, but nonetheless some concerns still remain imo.
edit on 1pmf31392031 by waftist because: spelling



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 03:25 PM
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For most medical doctors, devising a routine procedure is a cash cow. Patience are, in words, put on a conveyor belt. I heard of one doctor that was doing cornea replacements as a routine procedure, ten or so per day at $15,000 a pop.

Its all about the money.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 11:03 PM
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Any time you have a medical procedure done, there is risk involved. If the risk is one in a hundred, that means one person in a hundred average has a problem. Those risks on the literature with bottle of pills your doctor gives you may sound small, but they are cumulative, if the risk of problems is one in a hundred and there are twenty different kinds of bad reactions that can occur, the chance of you getting one of the problems could be as much as one in five. There could be an overlap and that may lower it to one in ten but then some people will also have two problems from the meds,

Those are only the results the doctors report though, most of the time the doctors do not report anything is related unless it is listed on the medical reaction sheet, the doctor thinks it is unrelated and does not want to spend an hour of their time filling out lots of paperwork, he/she either just tells the patient it is not related, or they blow it off as psychosomatic. You have a hard time sometimes getting the doctor to list a reaction to a med on your record.



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