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Could high temperatures in the Persian Gulf also affect US naval vessels too?

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posted on Jun, 16 2019 @ 11:50 AM
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Was reading some articles from a few years ago and I came across a few about UK warships being potentially affected by high temperatures in the Persian Gulf:

High Temperatures in Gulf Cause British Warships to Break Down


BAHRAIN -- Not even billion-pound British warships can defeat the high temperatures of the Gulf.

Six 1 billion-pound British destroyers are apparently breaking down because their power systems can't handle long tours in the region.

The Type 45 destroyers have been working alongside the U.S Navy since last year, protecting aircraft carriers launching airstrikes against Islamic State.

British MPs have now grilled top navy officials about the regular breakdowns as part of an inquiry by the U.K. parliament's Defense Committee.

"It's a billion-pound asset that you're putting into perhaps a war zone and we don't know if these people who are making up the complement on that ship will go in there and come back out alive, because there might be a problem with the power system on the ship," committee member MP Douglas Chapman said.

However, a representative of Rolls-Royce, which supplied engines for the ships, said they were never designed for such extreme temperatures.

"Are the conditions experienced in the Gulf in line with that specification?" asked the company's Naval Marine, EMEA Programs director Tomas Leahy.

"No, they are not. The equipment is having to operate in far more arduous conditions than were initially required by that specification."

Meanwhile, BAE Systems which built the destroyers said they were never meant for "repeated and continuous" missions in the Gulf.



So, obviously, you consequently ask "would US naval vessels also be affected as well"?

Do you think we should be a little concerned for US naval vessels? Can understand that the articles linked to this are about British warships, but equally French and US warships could also be affected as well...

UK Guardian - Destroyers will break down if sent to Middle East, admits Royal Navy
edit on 16-6-2019 by AnakinWayneII because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 16 2019 @ 11:56 AM
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The USN has been operating under those conditions in the Persian Gulf and Middle East for decades .

Haven’t heard of many problems so far .

There might be some small issues but I doubt it will affect combat readiness .



posted on Jun, 16 2019 @ 12:03 PM
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150% Of spec is normal testing, stuff running 24-7-365, year after year is where the issues come in.






posted on Jun, 16 2019 @ 12:22 PM
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No our soldiers and equipment are bad Azz! Britain hasn’t had a good navy in 200years!



posted on Jun, 16 2019 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: AnakinWayneII

The Type 45 has a design flaw in the intercooler supplied by Northrop. That's not allowing it to get enough power in the Gulf. All six ships will be refitted by 2021 and that should resolve the issue.



posted on Jun, 16 2019 @ 01:58 PM
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The Navy used to send the Kidd class destroyers almost exclusively to the Med and Gulf because they had been designed for the heat (originally bound for the Shah's navy).

High -temperatures can be a beast, and when temps climb, cooling becomes increasingly difficult. That applies to everything from powerplants (engines, transmissions, etc), electric equipment, and people. So yes, it has an effect.



posted on Jun, 16 2019 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: AnakinWayneII

Sounds like the US has different specs because they planned on long operations there and the UK did not.



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 08:42 AM
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I guess I just don't get it.
They're in the ocean, the water temps can't be over what, 70F in the shallows?

Compared to the ships mass there's essentially unlimited cooling capacity right under their bow.



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: lordcomac

Which does you no good, because only the hull is in contact with the water.
edit on 6/17/2019 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 09:01 AM
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Which does you no good, because only the hull in in contact with the water.


Because heat can't transfer from one material to another.



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: roadgravel

Then why do they need cooling systems to begin with, if the hull in contact with the water is good enough.



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

The sea could be used but it is not. He said capacity.



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 10:06 AM
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originally posted by: WUNK22
No our soldiers and equipment are bad Azz! Britain hasn’t had a good navy in 200years!


The RN has shrunk recently to a shadow of it's former self but within the last 200 years they did a pretty good job with D-Day and in re-taking the Falklands too, did they not?



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 11:12 AM
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a reply to: roadgravel

Except that it really can't. The electronics and the engines on these ships generate heat much faster than they'd be able to get rid of it if they were using just the ocean under the hull. These hulls are so relatively small, they wouldn't be able to transfer heat efficiently and keep everything cool without some kind of help.



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