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Buddy vs Mate

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posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 03:03 PM
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So basically, the way I understand it, calling someone 'buddy' is the American version to how someone affectionately refers to another person... the same way Aussies use 'mate'.

Sure, both phrases can have a passive aggressive intent in both cultures at times, depending on context... But generally, it's meant as an affectionate term, right?

In Australia though, I'm convinced the term 'buddy' has just become a purely passive aggressive term, which you call someone when your trying to be polite, but don't think the person is worth being referred to by their actual name!

I could seriously know someone for 10 straight years and only ever be referred to by them as 'mate' and I wouldn't have a single issue... But I'm just so utterly sick of this 'buddy' nonsense.

When someone continuously calls me 'buddy', it just infuriates me... I literally just want to poke them in the eye or something, then say, the names Daniel bitch... and you know it!!!

It's just an arrogant prick of a term to use to refer to someone, when you obviously already know their name!




edit on 15-2-2019 by Subaeruginosa because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: Subaeruginosa
... I literally just want to poke them in the eye or something, then say, the names Daniel bitch... and you know it!!!

It's just an arrogant prick of a term to use to refer to someone, when you obviously already know their name!





I hear ya, Daniel bitch. *winks*



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 03:09 PM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa


It can be used in a less than positive way, somewhat like you are saying. Akin to calling someone a child.

"Sounds like you'd fit in with the snowflakes there, bud."




edit on 15-2-2019 by chadderson because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 03:14 PM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa




posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 03:14 PM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa
Then there is "My son", which I believe is what some Londoners say to one another. (I've just been watching an episode of Porridge. Grouty says it to Fletch at least twice)


edit on 15-2-2019 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 03:41 PM
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I'm not your friend, buddy!
I'm not your buddy, guy!

Etc.



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa

Thats a good point buddy.

Dont stress over it mate. Anybuddy calling me something I don't like, I'd say, 'hey mate, stop calling me buddy bro'.

Good luck bud .



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 03:43 PM
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originally posted by: Subaeruginosa

Sure, both phrases can have a passive aggressive intent in both cultures at times, depending on context... But generally, it's meant as an affectionate term, right?


Correct. It's not something to get upset about in the States. It CAN be used negatively, but that usage is fairly rare. It's a greeting more than anything. "Hey, bud!" for example, even though you know his name. Calling someone "dude" is probably worse. It's okay to say, "This dude I met did this." but CALLING someone "Dude" seems to me to be a bit rude. Depends on what is said next before you ought to take offense though. It could still be okay.



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 04:00 PM
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In call people all sorts including bud, buddy, mate, geezer, shegg, and dare I say it, even dude.

It's just a part of who I am, my mates are all pretty much the same, in fact I often call my Missus G-Dog and my kids L-Dog, etc depending on their first initial, and they call me C-Dog, lol

It's fair to say, though, that we have crazy banter in this house 😜




posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 04:06 PM
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originally posted by: Subaeruginosa
So basically, the way I understand it, calling someone 'buddy' is the American version to how someone affectionately refers to another person... the same way Aussies use 'mate'.

Sure, both phrases can have a passive aggressive intent in both cultures at times, depending on context... But generally, it's meant as an affectionate term, right?

In Australia though, I'm convinced the term 'buddy' has just become a purely passive aggressive term, which you call someone when your trying to be polite, but don't think the person is worth being referred to by their actual name!

I could seriously know someone for 10 straight years and only ever be referred to by them as 'mate' and I wouldn't have a single issue... But I'm just so utterly sick of this 'buddy' nonsense.

When someone continuously calls me 'buddy', it just infuriates me... I literally just want to poke them in the eye or something, then say, the names Daniel bitch... and you know it!!!

It's just an arrogant prick of a term to use to refer to someone, when you obviously already know their name!



friends are friends, and mates are mates, but "buddies" f#€% each other



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 04:48 PM
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Calm down China, it's just a name
I like China as a nick name for people, meaning, China plate rhyming slang for mate or china doll for ladies

1850, American English, possibly an alteration of brother, or from British colloquial butty "companion" (1802), itself perhaps a variant of booty in booty fellow "confederate who shares plunder" (1520s). But butty, meaning "work-mate," also was a localized dialect word in England and Wales, attested since 18c., and long associated with coal miners. Short form bud is attested from 1851. Reduplicated form buddy-buddy (adj.) attested by 1952, American English.

Buddy system attested from 1920.
From thesaurus.com

Really don't find buddy offensive myself and often use the term bud instead of a persons name
Maybe it's the person calling you buddy not the name itself

I have been in trouble for calling a lady from Thailand China, not from the Thai girl but the lady I was with
Someone is going to be offended no matter what a person says, people are so precious these days



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: MantheDevilsApe

Well if you consider in the wild animals mate for life.
Mate would be consistent with animal sexual partners or even the act
Those rabbits are mating



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 04:56 PM
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Come to think of it, "my friend".
Tone of voice would make all the difference between genuine affection and sarcastic aggression.



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa

It can go either way. It depends on how you say it. How sarcastic sounding and the like.

Saying Mate here... you better be Australian lol Mate tends to mean a sexual partner.

Though all depends on where you are in the states. My heritage uses all sorts of terms of endearment. Like Babe, Hun, Sha, Darlin, and so forth, whether you're a girl or boy, it doesn't matter. It means the same and it's not sexual.

Sometimes saying "buddy" can be bad no matter how you say it. "Boy" is even worse. Pal, Guy, Bub, Bud, Dude, Man... So many terms.



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 06:20 PM
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"Bud" by itself originally meant "son of" so you have Jim the blacksmith and Bud, his son.




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