It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

How old are you if you move to another planet?

page: 2
12
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 10:39 AM
link   
People probably didn't live as long 1000s of years ago. 80 years for a life time might be too long.




posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 10:41 AM
link   
You are correct. There are actually older ages identified in the bible. 969 years for Methuselah.

a reply to: roadgravel



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 10:42 AM
link   
a reply to: roadgravel

There's records of Asians living up to 600 years.



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 10:46 AM
link   
We wouldn’t put our oldest people on a shuttle to Mars or to any other planet. Ideally our initial colonists would be young strong heathy astronauts. If the oldest of these surviving colonists dies while in Mars they would possibly die earlier than we would expect (due hostile environment and not being adapted to the living conditions).

It would most likely take a long time for the average life expectancy on the new planet to reach what it was on the original planet.


a reply to: roadgravel



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 10:47 AM
link   
Those born on leap year only have a birthday once every four years so a person born on February 28th will be 20 where a person born on February 29th will be only five. Miraculously, those born on February 29th age four ties faster than everyone else.

In other words, it's a non-problem.



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 10:50 AM
link   

originally posted by: CynConcepts

originally posted by: roadgravel
a reply to: Buvvy




We would be looking in the 32-35 day orbital range around the planets sun.


That doesn't seem to fit a star. It is in the range of a moon, like ours.


Titan orbits Saturn 36.20 days....vs earths orbiting sun a little over 365 days. A moon would make more sense.


Good one and the gravity is less than earth; however, Titan is not remotely identified as habitable.



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 10:52 AM
link   

originally posted by: NightFlight
How old in earth years would one be, lets say, one night at 6:30 pm you left the solar system from earth. At 8:30 pm the exact same night, you return - 32 earth years equivalent later.

If you were 20 years old, would you now be 52? Your birth certificate says you are 20. Messed up, aint it.


Good point! Not to mention - how will age be addressed if we ever find a way to place humans into some type of “stasis” for interstellar travel.



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 10:57 AM
link   

originally posted by: schuyler
Those born on leap year only have a birthday once every four years so a person born on February 28th will be 20 where a person born on February 29th will be only five. Miraculously, those born on February 29th age four ties faster than everyone else.

In other words, it's a non-problem.


It is an interesting thought exercise. The older ages in the Bible are what started my thought process. Our not-to-distant future colonization of Mars makes the question relevant.

Considering how much our world struggles to adapt to redefining establish definitions - might as well add defining off-planet “age” to the list.



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 11:13 AM
link   

originally posted by: Sapphire
a reply to: roadgravel

There's records of Asians living up to 600 years.


I will have to research that! Thank you for sharing!

Scenario: Incoming asteroid is identified as an end of life event. We put our best and brightest on every rocket availble to and send them to Mars. They reach Mars and their life is similar to that of the earliest man on Earth (primarily living underground to avoid radiation).

Time and human nature can distort facts. Assuming that the new Martian authoritative class determines that revelaing the ages of the initial Mars settlers isn’t a threat this information would be passed down. The ages most likely wouldn’t be threatening because culturally our elders are revered.

6000 years in the future Martians will have defined their solar year based on the Mars orbit of the sun. Martian will grow up with the understanding that their average lifespan is closer to 36 years. The oldest Martian documents will identfy that the first people on Mars lived to 80 years old. The explanation as to why might be very distorted, withheld or lost to history but odds are the ages will be identified.

Some day in the very distant future I can envision a Martian pondering over the same question that I am pondering. How in the heck did they live so long vs. where were they really from?



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 11:36 AM
link   
a reply to: Buvvy
As lovely as this place is, I don't think it will last much longer.

Call it intuition.



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 11:44 AM
link   

originally posted by: Sapphire
a reply to: Buvvy
As lovely as this place is, I don't think it will last much longer.

Call it intuition.


I agree.

At least living in Canada you are better prepared to deal with the cold/freezing that could be arriving with many of the potential world wide disasters. I keep feeling an intuitive need to prepare for bitter cold/freezing sub-zero weather but I live in a climate where it really isn’t necessary.



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 12:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Buvvy

I'm used to the cold, I prefer it to the warmth. I guess i'm one of those ice age nuts who believe it's going to increase in the next 20 years. Oh well. Let them throw stones, i'm used to it.



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 12:08 PM
link   
What about 40 Eridani A, the home planet of the Vulcans? =) Not sure what the gravity would be like on a Superplanet, but what if?
40 Eridani A



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 12:09 PM
link   
a reply to: Buvvy

I reckon off woelders would still use Earth Years old. Perhaps insteas of writong "I'm 41 y/o" they'd write "I'm 41 e/y"

I think it's going to be really interesting after we achieve first contact to see how aliens mark the passing of time and the age of their race.



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 12:11 PM
link   

originally posted by: Buvvy
You are correct. There are actually older ages identified in the bible. 969 years for Methuselah.

a reply to: roadgravel


There are people hundreds of years old in Interview with a Vampire too but it's not really relevant to the discussion either...



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 12:15 PM
link   

originally posted by: Buvvy

originally posted by: schuyler
Those born on leap year only have a birthday once every four years so a person born on February 28th will be 20 where a person born on February 29th will be only five. Miraculously, those born on February 29th age four ties faster than everyone else.

In other words, it's a non-problem.


It is an interesting thought exercise. The older ages in the Bible are what started my thought process.


Apologies, I stand corrected...



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 12:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: djz3ro

originally posted by: Buvvy
You are correct. There are actually older ages identified in the bible. 969 years for Methuselah.

a reply to: roadgravel


There are people hundreds of years old in Interview with a Vampire too but it's not really relevant to the discussion either...


I don’t accept everything that is written at face value; however, there is scientific evidence to support the biblical flood happened. There are also other cultures that identify that earths earliest recorded inhabitents identified thier ages as being measured in hundreds of years.
edit on 3-2-2019 by Buvvy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 12:19 PM
link   

originally posted by: djz3ro
a reply to: Buvvy

I reckon off woelders would still use Earth Years old. Perhaps insteas of writong "I'm 41 y/o" they'd write "I'm 41 e/y"

I think it's going to be really interesting after we achieve first contact to see how aliens mark the passing of time and the age of their race.


I like the e/y instead of y/o! Great solution!



posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 01:05 PM
link   
a reply to: Buvvy

I found this link pretty cool. A lot in there that may help with your question.
www.researchgate.net...




posted on Feb, 3 2019 @ 01:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: Tarzan the apeman.
a reply to: Buvvy

I found this link pretty cool. A lot in there that may help with your question.
www.researchgate.net...



Nice link! Thanks for sharing!

I especially liked this part: “Of course the concept "change" no more exists than "time." What exist are timed, changing objects, (using the sun, etc. as the regulator) including changing human objects which grow increasingly wrinklier as they go through life "timing" themselves and the other objects (of which they are aware) in their interaction with other objects.

*Time* does not start when forces (super-gravity) and matter procreate themselves into the universe spontaneously. The *human notion* of what they, in various languages, tag as *time* "started" (became a useful fiction ) when the various extinct hominids or other primates that resemble modern humans reached a stage when they were able to distinguish or experientially perceive definable existential "periods" in the continuum which they divided into "past" and "present." They called this sensory faculty of distinguishing the reoccurring or expected behaviour of causal objects from the unexpected behaviour of causal objects "time. There are no chronological interstices in the continuum despite the creation of nanoseconds and other such utile non-chronic innovations. "Duration" like *instantaneity" does not exist - only changing durational matergy exists.”




top topics



 
12
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join