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Investigating the Invisible Color that Ancient People Couldn’t See

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posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 06:55 AM
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a reply to: 3n19m470

Someone else posted about that site, TheConstruKctionofLight here. Also, the Electric Universe website has quite a few articles along similar lines. Just go there and do a search for Saturn. It's all very interesting but I'm not 100% convinced we ever orbited Saturn no matter what ancient myths say. The best I can say so far is "possible."

I really haven't had the time to read The Saturn Death Cult site yet. I just learned about it. It's bookmarked and I will get to it soon as it relates to other things I was following. A quick search through Google on Ganymede Hypothesis shows it on a bunch of websites I read already so I will for sure be checking this out also.

The entire concept of a cluster of planets so visible in the sky is just so different from what we see today.




posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 09:52 PM
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It seems that green and blue would be the background for most of life's scenery. Why would you describe the color of the background? no need, so you just use the contrasting colors. Most likely you would say the color matched the sky or sea, no need for green or blue.



posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 09:24 AM
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Awesome thread OP! Finally something worth reading and thinking about.

The largest part of the issue is cultural differences, a fact that is obvious to most people who've spent a significant amount of time studying other languages.

Ancient Hebrew, for example, has 11 different words for taking a human life. Killing someone took on shades of nuance that we appear to miss in English today. Apparently the ancient Greeks "saw" different "colors" in the rainbow; based on their color vocabulary and usage. It's s jump, however, to say that because they described experiences differently, like seeing a rainbow, that they didn't have the physiological capability to see the same thing. They simply thought of, and described the experience differently.

I found this article and discussion interesting: (www.quora.com...) The author points out art from the time period in question that very clearly contains blue colors, and does so in a pleasing way.

It's not that we developed or evolved a way of seeing blue. We just started to think about "blue" things differently; much the same as the tribesmen have a very different take of subtleties of green. It's not that we Westerner's cannot physiologically detect the difference. We've never had occasion to notice.



posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 09:33 AM
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I seem to remember somewhere along the line learning that men have a basic vocabulary of 12 or so colors: Red, blue, green. etc. Women have a vocabulary of over 200 colors: Mauve, teal, salmon, etc. My wife and I have a good laugh over this occasionally.

We'll be out clothing shopping and she'll say, "Go get me that XXXXXX shirt I liked." I have no idea what XXXXXX means. But I can go pick it off the rack.



posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 09:33 AM
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a reply to: Bruce001

If you don't notice it, isn't it invisible to you?



posted on Apr, 14 2019 @ 11:03 PM
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The invisible color is a thin red line in the black sea ... NATO's departure from the Black Sea and Afghanistan needed to avert nuclear war !



posted on Apr, 21 2019 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: carlncarl
It seems that green and blue would be the background for most of life's scenery. Why would you describe the color of the background? no need, so you just use the contrasting colors. Most likely you would say the color matched the sky or sea, no need for green or blue.


Probably also why we don't notice that extra shade of green. There is just no context in which the difference in shade affects our daily life. But those tribes people might need to see shades of green to distinguish different plants?

On the other hand, every kid in school eventually gets handed a box of crayons to color with. The ancients didn't have boxes of crayons. Usually, artificial dyes and pigments required finding an appropriately colored plant. (Red, on the other hand could be achieved by cutting open your own skin.)



posted on Apr, 21 2019 @ 12:34 AM
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originally posted by: 3n19m470
a reply to: toms54

Maybe the ancient legends are from a time when we lived on another planet? Or maybe earth conditions were different?

This site has always been interesting to me saturndeathcult.com...
And the extended theory to this, the Ganymede Hypothesis is also pretty interesting.



If the Ananuki keep coming back every 20000 years or so to "reset" our civilization, then possibly there were a few "resets" where the Earth just plain wasn't habitable for humans (or they needed time to clean up the remnants of the now dead civilizations.)

So Mars and Ganymede or maybe even Titan could be terraformed temporarily as a place to set up a human colony for a while?

You can warm up any planet just by hitting it hard enough with a big enough asteroid. It won't stay warm forever, but its core temperature will raise for a while. And if the asteroid is made up of ice, then you're killing two birds with one stone. (Until the solar wind has time to drag all that atmospheric oxygen and hydrogen away again.)



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