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Count of St. Germain, time traveler ???

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posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 10:43 AM
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originally posted by: AthlonSavage
The legend of St Germaine actually stems from an earlier legend of the the wandering jew.

Wikipedia describes The Wandering Jew is a mythical immortal man whose legend began to spread in Europe in the 13th century.[1]

The original legend concerns a Jew who taunted Jesus on the way to the Crucifixion and was then cursed to walk the earth until the Second Coming. The exact nature of the wanderer's indiscretion varies in different versions of the tale, as do aspects of his character; sometimes he is said to be a shoemaker or other tradesman, while sometimes he is the doorman at Pontius Pilate's estate.


Or could he have been Judas? Wasnt he cursed to wonder until christs return? (not talking about hoaky vamp movies) but real bible history (mythology whatever your flavor)




posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 11:36 AM
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The letter talks of revelations that would come true in the middle of the 20th century. Can anyone more learned on this subject tell me what those revelations were?



posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 11:57 AM
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originally posted by: Whatthedoctorordered
Or could he have been Judas? Wasnt he cursed to wonder until christs return? (not talking about hoaky vamp movies) but real bible history (mythology whatever your flavor)

Judas was said to have hanged himself, but I guess it could have been a ruse or it may have gotten confabulated in the texts because around that time there was apparently a "Jesus" who was hanged for being a sorcerer (which Jesus definitely was). And you're right, there was that Dracula movie in which Dracula is actually an immortal Judas.

I always understood that the Comte de St. Germain was an alchemist of some kind, linked to the Emerald Tablets of Thoth and Hermes Trismegistus.



posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: Ddrneville

Come on, now.
It's fun to imagine and all, but it is very clearly and very obviously a fantasy. I've read a good bit about him, and every single semi-credible source makes it glaringly obvious that it is complete and utter BS. The fact that people hundreds of years later claimed to be him means less than nothing. Anybody can claim that, it doesn't actually mean there is any credence. The original was a self-mythologizing charlatan, and everybody since then is a liar/fraud. I feel ridiculous for even having to type this out, it's so damn obvious.



posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 05:46 PM
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a reply to: wheresthebody



Not sure what you are talking about as a reference. The lady said "My uncle thought he was St. JEROME" NOT Germaine.



posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: norhoc

well i'll be damned...



posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 08:18 PM
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originally posted by: SocratesJohnson
Old school

In Search Of.. **The Man Who Would Not Die** (Season 2 Episode 2)

Love me some Lenard Nemoy

Some say it was really him getting into the carriage. Just a fun tidbit. I saw it when it first aired on tv.



posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 08:22 PM
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originally posted by: Maroboduus
a reply to: Ddrneville

Come on, now.
It's fun to imagine and all, but it is very clearly and very obviously a fantasy. I've read a good bit about him, and every single semi-credible source makes it glaringly obvious that it is complete and utter BS. The fact that people hundreds of years later claimed to be him means less than nothing. Anybody can claim that, it doesn't actually mean there is any credence. The original was a self-mythologizing charlatan, and everybody since then is a liar/fraud. I feel ridiculous for even having to type this out, it's so damn obvious.
But then there's this www.amazon.com... an account of him at the French Court.



posted on Aug, 16 2018 @ 01:18 AM
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originally posted by: oldcarpy
a reply to: dantanna


Are you referring to the Scottish case where the chap video'd his dog doing a Nazi salute whenever he shouted "Gas the Jews"?

Poor bastard? A joke? Hilarious.



I thought it was really funny. And I have no problem with Jews or any other race or religion. You didn’t think his dog really wanted to gas some Jews did you?

You better learn to laugh, cuz ain’t none of us getting out of here alive, except maybe st Germaine
edit on 16-8-2018 by Guiltyguitarist because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-8-2018 by Guiltyguitarist because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 05:14 AM
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a reply to: Ddrneville

Good thread, one of the most fascinating and mysterious figures in history. If it isn't fake the letter of Voltaire is highly intriguing and revealing.



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: Ddrneville


New Orleans has a different St. Germaine legend. In the French quarter , there is an old brick mansion right on the corner (a lawyer currently owns it). It has gorgeous windows all around the main floor at street level, and a balcony on the second floor with a row of arched windows, with one window being bricked in.

I can’t recall the year in question but the Count came to the Big Easy and quickly became the toast of the town. He was known for his large parties, where people noted that while he carried a goblet of red ‘wine’, he never ate at any of the events. These went on for over 40 years in the city, and people he knew from Paris would remark that they didn’t believe his [Count’s] story that he was the Count’s son, because 5 minutes with the man dislodged any such notion he was anyone else but the original Count.

Now these parties were raucous, as New Orleans parties are prone to be. One night a young woman stayed behind after the party goers left and eventually found herself in an upstairs room with the Count. He swooped in and bit her neck, she - fearing for her life, ran towards the only escape she could see- the aforementioned window, crashed through it onto the balcony and jumped to the street below where she broke her leg. A nearby police officer came to her aid and had her taken to a physician. The police returned and asked the Count to come to the station. He sweet talked the police into meeting them there the following morning but , alas, he never showed up. So the police showed up at his residence only to find it abandoned. There were throw rugs in every room with blood stains beneath them and not one morsel of food or any evidence of any cooking in the mansions kitchens. The Count disappeared that day and never returned to New Orleans.

Subsequent owners bricked up the window because it was considered bad luck. The blood stains could still be seen for many years.

So, for the residents of The French a quarter, Count St. Germaine is seen more as an immortal vampire and less as an alchemist.
edit on 17-8-2018 by rimjaja because: Typos



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 10:12 PM
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There's a bunch of these fellows wandering around I bet, from Cain (bigfoot) to perpetually cloned Tut, to escaped experiments the Russians lost track of..



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 08:56 PM
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If that Voltaire letter was authentic I wouldn’t be very surprised someone of his historical stature would be privy to certain elements of our future because he belongs to the pantheon of canon



posted on Aug, 19 2018 @ 05:48 PM
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Some people believe that the person on the right of Madam Blavatsky in this photograph:
www.touchedbylight.co.uk...
is Count St Germain. Of course, if you don't believe that Blavatsky's "masters" were real, then you will dismiss this photo as a fake. Even some Theosophists who accept their reality dismiss this photo (see here) as a fake photo. However their reason is wrong because the original photo linked to above (rather than the black and white, touched-up version that they debunk) is obviously much older than any photograph of a drawing of the group drawn by an artist some time between the 1930s and 1950s. Contrary to this claim, the drawing looks nothing like the photo, which makes it certain that the drawing was based upon an old photo rather than - as claimed in the link above - that the photo was a photo of the drawing. Also, their argument that it could not be a photo of real people because Madam Blavatsky looks as tall as the Master Morya, who was supposed to be over 6ft, is wrong as well, because she is sitting on a large chair with her feet propped up on a kind of stool, which invalidates any comparison between her stature and that of the figure (supposedly Master Morya) wearing a white turban who was standing behind her.

The truth of the matter is that the figure on the right bears no resemblance to contemporary portraits of Count St Germain because he is actually what the Theosophist Charles Leadbeater called the "Master R". In his writings, he claimed that this person had been known as Count St Germain, although it is unknown what evidence Leadbeater had for believing that. This led to his later false identification with Count St Germain. Research into the provenance of the photo reveals that it was taken in a hall in London around 1890 (this is consistent with its quality) when Blavatsky was giving a public lecture. A psychic member of the audience claimed that she could see three men standing behind Blavatsky, and a photographer who was present but who did not see anyone with her asked Blavatsky if he could photograph her, leading to an image of three of her invisible "Masters" being captured on his photographic plate. Most people will of course dismiss this as baloney. But it still does not explain how the old photo appeared in the first place, given genuine accounts at the time of the circumstances of how it was taken.
edit on 19-8-2018 by micpsi because: (no reason given)



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