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Serapeum of Saqqara. Alternative theory for the site

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posted on Jul, 31 2018 @ 08:39 PM
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All,

I published an article on this subject. Please have a look.

www.academia.edu...

You can also find this paper on ancient origins

www.ancient-origins.net...


Thanks

Konstantin




posted on Jul, 31 2018 @ 09:12 PM
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originally posted by: kborissov
All,

I published an article on this subject. Please have a look.

www.academia.edu...

You can also find this paper on ancient origins

www.ancient-origins.net...


Thanks

Konstantin


Giant Beer Batteries. That's a good idea. And, from what I read, the logic fits. To what end, we'll never know, or how it benefited anyone, either.

But I dig it.

Don't tell Giorgio though... he'll run his fingers through his hair, with a wry grin slowly growing on his face, say..... "Alien beer..." while peering into the camera lens.




edit on 31-7-2018 by SummerRain because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2018 @ 11:04 PM
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I like the idea and can certainly see the logic behind it in your article. Definitely a unique alternative explanation.

On an unrelated note, you have the same name as my twice great grandfather and I am curious where you are from?




posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 04:20 AM
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It would be more helpful if you could provide a summary, or list of points, rather than pointing to external links.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 06:35 AM
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a reply to: kborissov

very cool idea

I can dig it



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: kborissov

Do you mind posting a few bullet points surrounding your theory? I can't see the PDF online right now, and can't download it at the moment either.

ETA: I did read the AO link, and it seems like an interesting theory. My question, of course, is whether or not there have been tests of any traces of chemicals left in the "sarcophagi," and if so, what were the results? If the fermenting liquid were left to just dry up, as you noted, which is why there were bull bones inside when discovered, then it seems like there would be massive traces and probably readily evident remaining solids from the fermentation process inside the boxes as well.

Has any of that been discovered/recorded?


edit on 1-8-2018 by SlapMonkey because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 12:34 PM
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I agree analysis of any residue is key to proving this sort of oddball theory. I believe
one box has a stain along the inside side, and some drip-like stains are visible on the
outside of a lid and a box. A theory is a special liquid was used to create the glass-like
smooth surfaces.

Given the one box and lid left in the hallway, unfinished and unplaced in it's final
resting place means the box builders left aburptly. It was the pre-dynastic stone
builders ( megalithic architects ) that worked on the contents of the Serapeum of
Saqqaram and the dynastic Egyptians found the store of boxes and adopted them
as the ancient civilizations are apt to do with megalithic structures and carved
crude heiroglyphs on the outside of some of the boxes.

It is a real mystery what the intended purpose of the 175 ton granite boxes was,
as they were pilfered in antiquity. I cannot imagine a purpose but surely the
ancient stone builders did.



a reply to: SlapMonkey



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 12:50 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDidHappen
I agree analysis of any residue is key to proving this sort of oddball theory. I believe
one box has a stain along the inside side, and some drip-like stains are visible on the
outside of a lid and a box. A theory is a special liquid was used to create the glass-like
smooth surfaces.

Yeah, I've researched a lot about the theory of stone-softening technology/chemicals/plants that may have existed back in the day. It's really interesting, and I don't see, with my limited knowledge of chemistry and geology, why something couldn't exist that we have yet to (re)discover.


Given the one box and lid left in the hallway, unfinished and unplaced in it's final
resting place means the box builders left aburptly. It was the pre-dynastic stone
builders ( megalithic architects ) that worked on the contents of the Serapeum of
Saqqaram and the dynastic Egyptians found the store of boxes and adopted them
as the ancient civilizations are apt to do with megalithic structures and carved
crude heiroglyphs on the outside of some of the boxes.

Sounds like we read/watch/listen to a lot of the same things.




posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 04:47 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDidHappen
Given the one box and lid left in the hallway, unfinished and unplaced in it's final
resting place means the box builders left aburptly.

More likely it was thieves that "left abruptly."


originally posted by: ThatDidHappenIt was the pre-dynastic stone
builders ( megalithic architects ) that worked on the contents of the Serapeum of
Saqqaram and the dynastic Egyptians found the store of boxes and adopted them
as the ancient civilizations are apt to do with megalithic structures and carved
crude heiroglyphs on the outside of some of the boxes.

Anyone that knows anything about this site just busted their guts laughing at you.


originally posted by: ThatDidHappen
It is a real mystery what the intended purpose of the 175 ton granite boxes was,
as they were pilfered in antiquity. I cannot imagine a purpose but surely the
ancient stone builders did.

They are too tired from the last one to laugh very hard at this one.
Good thing you quit there. It would have become SMH instead of ROFLMAO.

Harte



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 05:46 PM
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The Inca adopted the inca road, in reality part of the pre-Incan megalith builders
network of roads leading through the sacred valley next to Cuscos.

It is an example where the foolish archeaologist insist Puma Punku was
made with copper tools.

Some of the boxes in the Serapeum at Saqqara have surfaces with 'bubbles'.
Theory is the boxes were cast in place.

Why thieves would be interested in an empty 100 ton granite box and 75
ton lid is beyond me, and being unfinished, it is probable it was left
in situ by the builders. Thieves may have wanted the granite for building
material and left it in the hallway where it is today. Maybe they moved it
into the hallway but were scared off by bulls. Egyptologist today think
bulls (sera) were buried in the boxes hence Serapeum. Buried birds are
found around the Giza area so burying bulls isn't a stretch.

a reply to: Harte

edit on 1-8-2018 by ThatDidHappen because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 06:24 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDidHappen
The Inca adopted the inca road, in reality part of the pre-Incan megalith builders
network of roads leading through the sacred valley next to Cuscos.


The pre-Incan people were the Wari they built part of the network. The Inca put it all together to support their late to the party empire which began in the 15th century. The Inca were building on ruins of numerous previous cultures some going back to circa 5,000 BCE. The oldest presently known is the Norte Chico culture which was contemporary with the AE civilization.


It is an example where the foolish archeaologist insist Puma Punku was
made with copper tools.


They used rocks mainly you might want to do some research and not just repeat what fringe TV shows and websites tell you to believe.


Some of the boxes in the Serapeum at Saqqara have surfaces with 'bubbles'.
Theory is the boxes were cast in place.


Do they? Evidence please. Oh and what do the inscription on the 80 ton sarcophagi say?


Why thieves would be interested in an empty 100 ton granite box and 75
ton lid is beyond me, and being unfinished, it is probable it was left
in situ by the builders.


Because the mummies of the Apish Bulls probably contain jewelry and other items. One such mummy was found - have you even bother to look at it?




edit on 1/8/18 by Hanslune because: removed an extra '0'



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDidHappen
The Inca adopted the inca road, in reality part of the pre-Incan megalith builders
network of roads leading through the sacred valley next to Cuscos.

There is some evidence that the Inca utilized portions of a couple of older roads built by the Wari, Chimu and Tiwanaku cultures.


originally posted by: ThatDidHappenIt is an example where the foolish archeaologist insist Puma Punku was
made with copper tools.

You're just being absurd. You realize, I hope, that samples of the metals used to hold some blocks together still exist, right?
Maybe you don't know much about the copper used by the Tiwanaku culture. It wouldn't surprise me, it's a fairly arcane topic. The copper in its native state there is naturally alloyed with a couple of other metals. It is as hard as cast iron, some of it even harder.

And the Wari, who came before the Tiwanaku, also had a robust metallurgical technology.


originally posted by: ThatDidHappenSome of the boxes in the Serapeum at Saqqara have surfaces with 'bubbles'.
Theory is the boxes were cast in place.

Source, please.
IIRC, the boxes are syenite, not granite, though the two minerals are very similar (syenite is deficient in quartz compared to granite, and is thus much softer and easier to quarry and shape.)


originally posted by: ThatDidHappenWhy thieves would be interested in an empty 100 ton granite box and 75
ton lid is beyond me, and being unfinished, it is probable it was left
in situ by the builders. Thieves may have wanted the granite for building
material and left it in the hallway where it is today. Maybe they moved it
into the hallway but were scared off by bulls. Egyptologist today think
bulls (sera) were buried in the boxes hence Serapeum. Buried birds are
found around the Giza area so burying bulls isn't a stretch.

a reply to: Harte

Remains of bulls were actually found there in situ where they were buried. The ritual involved cooking and eating the bulls. The bones were mixed with bitumen, which is a natural asphalt-like tar, and buried. It seems they didn't differentiate the bones. That is, bones from different bulls were buried together.

Harte
edit on 8/1/2018 by Harte because: of the wonderful things he does!



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune
You got an extra zero there Hans old buddy.
No big deal, except this is ATS. You know what I mean.

Harte



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: Harte

Thanks for noticing that ...... I noted our two responses were very similar - you provided more info thou.



Oh my favorite image of a worked rock from PP, left unfinished showing how they were fashioned.

I've decided to double down on the fringe - they are going for 10,000 BC - heck not good enough I'm going 50,000 BC.
edit on 1/8/18 by Hanslune because: Added image



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 08:25 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: kborissov

Do you mind posting a few bullet points surrounding your theory? I can't see the PDF online right now, and can't download it at the moment either.

ETA: I did read the AO link, and it seems like an interesting theory. My question, of course, is whether or not there have been tests of any traces of chemicals left in the "sarcophagi," and if so, what were the results? If the fermenting liquid were left to just dry up, as you noted, which is why there were bull bones inside when discovered, then it seems like there would be massive traces and probably readily evident remaining solids from the fermentation process inside the boxes as well.

Has any of that been discovered/recorded?



please see here for points.
grahamhancock.com...,1152521

Also, I would suggest to actually download the pdf on academia.edu. I use references through the text to support one or the other claim I make in the text. It is easy to see which research group or university did research to support my claims, In Ancient Origins paper, all references were stripped from the text (though still listed at the end), not easy to look for support material. Let me know if you still have trouble.

There were and probably still are the traces of the chemical compound (though by now after 170 years since it rediscovered, probably well contaminated) but anyway, even that have not been analyzed (at least to my knowledge) and probably will not be soon (which is sad). Egyptologists are the gate keepers in that place, and I do not think they will open their doors so easy for scientists, researchers. Doubt, they will not shoot themselves in a foot.

what I think would be really cool though if someone took those components I listed in the text, dumped those in the granite coffer, closed the lid, pile stones on top and watch what happen. Interesting experiment!



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 09:31 PM
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originally posted by: kborissov

originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: kborissov

Do you mind posting a few bullet points surrounding your theory? I can't see the PDF online right now, and can't download it at the moment either.

ETA: I did read the AO link, and it seems like an interesting theory. My question, of course, is whether or not there have been tests of any traces of chemicals left in the "sarcophagi," and if so, what were the results? If the fermenting liquid were left to just dry up, as you noted, which is why there were bull bones inside when discovered, then it seems like there would be massive traces and probably readily evident remaining solids from the fermentation process inside the boxes as well.

Has any of that been discovered/recorded?



please see here for points.
grahamhancock.com...,1152521


what I think would be really cool though if someone took those components I listed in the text, dumped those in the granite coffer, closed the lid, pile stones on top and watch what happen. Interesting experiment!


Nothing is stopping you from doing such an experiment in your location. If you think it is a valid idea then obtain the money and conduct the experiment. I mean that is what real scientists do.

I'm sure you can obtain money from the many fringe and alt. writers who have made millions selling books.



posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 12:07 PM
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a reply to: kborissov

Yeah, that experiment is the only one that may validate your claims...why don't you put the wheels in motion and try to get the funding to recreate the theoretical process? (Like I just noticed that Hanslune said)

I read the responses to you ancient-origins...people are brutal on there.



posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 01:01 PM
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Pictures of the bubbles, it looks like the box was in a concrete form:





Sorry the pics are so blurry. The inside surfaces of the indentations
shown are smooth. At least one box also has these 'bubbles' as well
as this and maybe other lids.

Mention the hard copper found alloyed, that is harder than pure copper, is
definitely hard enought to carve crude niches in granite. But the niches and
Andes crosses at Tiwanku are perfect, recessed, angles and beautiful. It
is impossible to accomplish this level of granite workmanship with bronze.


edit on 2-8-2018 by ThatDidHappen because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 04:12 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDidHappen
Pictures of the bubbles, it looks like the box was in a concrete form:





Sorry the pics are so blurry. The inside surfaces of the indentations
shown are smooth. At least one box also has these 'bubbles' as well
as this and maybe other lids.


They look like features of the stone not 'concrete' the scale is way off too.



This is a link to a pdf to the size of bubbles in concrete:

www.google.com...



Mention the hard copper found alloyed, that is harder than pure copper, is
definitely hard enought to carve crude niches in granite. But the niches and
Andes crosses at Tiwanku are perfect, recessed, angles and beautiful. It
is impossible to accomplish this level of granite workmanship with bronze.


Harte is speaking about the Inca who used such copper tools more than the Tiwanaku who came 800 years before them. PP appears to have have been made with both but with more use of the older stone on stone technology.

Why in your opinion is it impossible? You do know that other cultures worked hard stone too. Why were they able to do so while you believe this particular culture could not?

If you noted the picture I linked too earlier - it show an incomplete block that was incomplete and being finished
using stone hammering.

Why do you believe they are 'perfect'? Please link to the study that determined that (hint there is no such study) or are you simply taking as fact a common fringe claim?

May I suggest you look at Carolyn Dean’s book titled “A Culture of Stone”. Which explains much of why they the Inca built the way they did - they didn't build PP but instead conquered its people and used them as skilled labor.

Details on Inca masonry work:

www.qosqo.com...

You may also wish to find and review Protzen's 'Inca Quarrying and Stone cutting' there is a link to pdf for that below

digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu...

The Tiwanaku quarry (one of many)



You also might want to obtain the Building Taypikala: Telluric Transformations in the Lithic Production of Tiwanaku pdf which you can download from the Academia.edu site

www.academia.edu...
edit on 2/8/18 by Hanslune because: Added link



posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: kborissov
Egyptologists are the gate keepers in that place, and I do not think they will open their doors so easy for scientists, researchers.

I see that you don't follow Egyptology news. In fact, they are quite open to working with other researchers and do so frequently to identify things.


what I think would be really cool though if someone took those components I listed in the text, dumped those in the granite coffer, closed the lid, pile stones on top and watch what happen. Interesting experiment!


Why should they? Having done some brewing myself, I can tell you that the amount of CO2 released is going to be pretty minimal (around 5 psi at the very greatest.) We brew beer in bottles, not in stone vessels with multiton lids... and the reason we do that is because the pressure generated isn't that high.

Additionally, even if the situation were as you described (the lid fit isn't "microns" I assure you) and the beer impossibly generated amounts of CO2 that was far beyond the scale of what you can do with brewing, the "light" generated by the granite would only appear as a pale faint glow in the interior of the sarcophagus. It wouldn't shine outside where the pressure is not the same. The light that the paper reports is almost undetectable.




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