Historical Jesus found!

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posted on Feb, 25 2005 @ 02:12 AM
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If anybody is interested, the following link is one website I found quickly that has Pontius Pilates' view of Jesus. I read his letters a couple years ago. The way he talks about Jesus is not like an earthly superior as Caesar. It was an interesting read for me a couple years ago.

members.tripod.com...

The Roman Catholic Church deemed in 3AD to oust material they felt wasn't important to their message and it's what we see as the canon today. I have read so much that is not in the Bible of today that can be useful in your quest for knowledge also about this era. Apocrypha is one term, but not all the listed apocrypha is what I have read. For instance, the "Aquarian Gospel" is one read for those that still need more detail about Jesus' Life. This is far more descriptive than Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John and yet, still doesn't contradict them. This Aquarian Gospel also fills in the gap of the missing 30 years and it might just show you the unedited truth to understanding these pictures of the past we're given as just pieces, thanks to the church in a building. I understand it is the church of the heart that has authority. (Valentinas letter to Flores? I think)is another word to look on a search engine. The letter to his niece is a beautiful linguistic of what we are doing here. Conversations with God is another useful step. For God really is everywhere, not just one book. Josephus is another great example.

reluctant-messenger.com...




posted on Mar, 2 2005 @ 09:24 AM
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Hy Andrew (Juliana, Steve, Peter, Petrus, Thaddeus, Archiereus etc.). You're getting quite desperate, aren't you? From philosophical forums to (a-)religous to SF to conspiracy ones. How deep can you sink? Well, maybe you have more success with your salestalks here. I won't interefere, so do your best.



posted on Mar, 7 2005 @ 06:34 AM
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Some stories, may they be fictious or real, become successful all around the globe, adaptable to any cultural surroundings on this planet: tales like "Pinocchio", films like "The Godfather", real-life stories like that of Oscar Schindler, scientific revolutions like Einstein's theories of relativity, catastrophes like the 2005 Tsunami, religious narrations like those found in the New Testament. Why? Because they comprise the basic rules for telling a story: they are fascinating, interesting, compelling, unique, understandable and universal. Successful stories have a common and basic aesthetic and social value, because they tell you something about life as a human...and they tend to stay simple and focused in their emotional and intellectual contents. Good stories as well as major turning points in history will make you forget the chaotic complexity of earthly life, because they reduce and transcend existence to a brilliant, airy, clear, majestic and spherical order.

In the course of history, successful stories have always undergone cultural transformations and adaptations, and poignant historical events have always had far reaching consequences. In the 1950s the German theologian Ethelbert Staufer discovered that the Christian Easter liturgy isn't based on genuine Christian sources, but on the funeral ceremony and passion of Caius Iulius Caesar, the founder of modern civilization. This ceremony is one of the most important events in the history of mankind, for it decided not only on the fate of the Roman Empire, but the fate of Christianity, Europe and the whole world. An improvised funeral service, driven by a wide range of deep emotions from sorrow to love, from remorse to fury, turned into uproar and insurrection, shaped Rome for all times and sealed Caesar's apotheosis to the highest God of the state, Divus Iulius. A few generations later Caesar's story was still being told, the God Iulius still being worshipped, especially in the Eastern colonies, where many of his veterans had settled after the Civil War. There, in a different cultural context, the story was altered, adapted, incorrectly translated, misinterpretated, but nonetheless understood: its core and ethics were preserved, and after the Jewish War, Christianity suddenly surfaced and swept into western Rome. Soon afterwards the Julian religion was extinct and forgotten.

In the book "Jesus was Caesar" by linguist and philosopher Francesco Carotta, Ethelbert Staufer's findings are anything but a coincidence, rather a logical result from a historical momentum and from cultural-dynamical phenomena, which Carotta reveals in a scientific tour-de-force rollercoaster ride. "Jesus was Caesar" is a praiseworthy and highly learned work of daring excellency. This is not some borderline esoteric pap, but a gritty and witty report that never loses its scientific seriousness. The reader will embark on a journey into the Roman womb of Christendom, where astounding parallels between the lives of Jesus Christ and Iulius Caesar are revealed. Strange enough, although Carotta finally presents to us the historical Jesus in overwhelming grandezza, orthodox scientists and believers hate (and fear) this work, which has been available in other languages since 1999, because it is not a theory at all, but a huge cluster of historical, archeological, numismatic, cultural, theological and linguistic facts and accords. Moreover, "Jesus was Caesar" is the ever first, truly integral design on the origin of Christianity and the roots of the Christ, far beyond the mere myth that is being preached in our churches. As Jesus/Iulius did, this book will eventually change the world...

...if, yes, IF Francesco Carotta is right. Since this is highly probable, scientists and non-scientists, believers and non-believers are starting to feel comfortable with Carotta's findings. His book was once said to be of the same order of importance as the scientific discoveries of Galileo and Kopernikus...and if this is all just a scientific hoax, it will still go down in history as one of the greatest and most thoroughly conceived pieces of art, comparable only to Beethoven's "Ode to Joy", Shakespeare's "Hamlet", the Mona Lisa...and yes, for some people maybe even "The Naked Gun". Either way, it's a "must read".

Found here



posted on Mar, 7 2005 @ 10:37 AM
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Originally posted by pacman
The Roman Catholic Church deemed in 3AD

The RCC didn't exist in '3ad'. Hell there are no church documents for any church in that period. Maybe you meant 300 ad? Regardless, the RCC wasn't the entitity that decided what were genuine gospels and what were manufactured ones. There is nothing to indicate that the 'gospel' of pilate is at all authentic.





 
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