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Japanese probe approaches weird-looking asteroid

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posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:07 PM
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New images of asteroid Ryugu show it looks weird, maybe.... ?

The Japanese space agency JAXA has published new images of asteroid Ryugu, target of their Hayabusa2 spacecraft. The images were taken on June 17th from a distance of 330 to 240 km, as the spacecraft was approaching its target. They show that Ryugu has a diameter of about 900 metres, consistent with predictions. Ryugu has a pronounced equatorial bulge (a feature seen in many asteroids) as well as crater-like features up to 200 metres across.



Hayabusa2 is expected to reach orbit around Ryugu on June 27th at a distance of 20 km.

www.hayabusa2.jaxa.jp...
edit on 19-6-2018 by JimOberg because: add photo




posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:17 PM
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Two pyramids bottom-to-bottom!

(Sorry, had to say it.)



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: JimOberg

Ryugu has a diameter of about 900 metres, consistent with predictions. Ryugu has a pronounced equatorial bulge (a feature seen in many asteroids) as well as crater-like features up to 200 metres across.
I find it odd that many small moons and asteroids have such relatively large craters. It would seem logical that an impact of that size would break the asteroid apart.
edit on 6/19/2018 by Devino because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:33 PM
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originally posted by: Devino
a reply to: JimOberg

Ryugu has a diameter of about 900 metres, consistent with predictions. Ryugu has a pronounced equatorial bulge (a feature seen in many asteroids) as well as crater-like features up to 200 metres across.
I find it odd that many small moons and asteroids have such relatively large craters. It would seem logical that an impact of that size would break the asteroid apart.

Maybe they're not so much an "impact," as a "bump," with both objects flying off each other without massive damage to either.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:42 PM
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a reply to: JimOberg

Why is it so fuzzy? The Japanese make some really nice cameras and optics.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: JimOberg

It's a giant diamond!



Lets mine it.

I call debs.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Two pyramids bottom-to-bottom!

(Sorry, had to say it.)


First thing that came to my mind is SNAKE EYES!!

One would think they could focus it better though lol



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 06:06 PM
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It should first poke it with a stick before proceeding ahead of itself.




posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: JimOberg



The Hayabusa2 mission is intended to image and sample the asteroid 1999 JU3, discovered in May 1999, now known as Ryugu, and to return samples of the asteroid, including samples excavated from an impactor to collect materials from under the surface, to Earth for analysis in laboratories.

nasaspaceflight.com - Sample return mission Hayabusa2 approaching Asteroid Ryugu.

They are not just going to orbit it but take samples and return them back to earth! The link explains how the previous mission did not succeed so they extended the Hayabusa2 mission to also sample and return the samples. That is pretty cool... or how the zombie apocalypse starts!

Lord knows what a fuzzy die in space has hidden under the surface!




posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 06:34 PM
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Looks like its spinning like a top....



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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a snow flake at gods own speed no air leavs big holes



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: JimOberg
Damn, that has time cube written all over it...



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 07:01 PM
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Nobody said its a rock yet? 😁



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: JimOberg



The Hayabusa2 mission is intended to image and sample the asteroid 1999 JU3, discovered in May 1999, now known as Ryugu, and to return samples of the asteroid, including samples excavated from an impactor to collect materials from under the surface, to Earth for analysis in laboratories.

nasaspaceflight.com - Sample return mission Hayabusa2 approaching Asteroid Ryugu.

They are not just going to orbit it but take samples and return them back to earth! The link explains how the previous mission did not succeed so they extended the Hayabusa2 mission to also sample and return the samples. That is pretty cool... or how the zombie apocalypse starts!

Lord knows what a fuzzy die in space has hidden under the surface!


Agreed, that is how you get a Zombie Apocalypse.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 07:29 PM
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It's a puzzle, that Ryugu Cube...



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 07:43 PM
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originally posted by: Devino
a reply to: JimOberg

Ryugu has a diameter of about 900 metres, consistent with predictions. Ryugu has a pronounced equatorial bulge (a feature seen in many asteroids) as well as crater-like features up to 200 metres across.
I find it odd that many small moons and asteroids have such relatively large craters. It would seem logical that an impact of that size would break the asteroid apart.


How do you know that's not what happened, and this one is the chunk that broke off?



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 07:44 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: JimOberg



The Hayabusa2 mission is intended to image and sample the asteroid 1999 JU3, discovered in May 1999, now known as Ryugu, and to return samples of the asteroid, including samples excavated from an impactor to collect materials from under the surface, to Earth for analysis in laboratories.

nasaspaceflight.com - Sample return mission Hayabusa2 approaching Asteroid Ryugu.

They are not just going to orbit it but take samples and return them back to earth! The link explains how the previous mission did not succeed so they extended the Hayabusa2 mission to also sample and return the samples. That is pretty cool... or how the zombie apocalypse starts!

Lord knows what a fuzzy die in space has hidden under the surface!


Agreed, that is how you get a Zombie Apocalypse.


I second that statement.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 07:48 PM
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Good thing it's not an icosahedron; it might indicate a critical hit.

Looks like a d8 to me. Roll initiative.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 07:56 PM
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cool and all, but what does this have to do with UFOs?
i

to me it looks like a natural asteroid



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 08:13 PM
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That reminds me of an eroded Star Wars death moon.



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