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You are my professor. The class is Civics 101.

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posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 06:43 PM
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Hi ATS.

Cutting to the chase: My background in civics is weak, and as I mature (slowly; not bragging) I am drawn more to the subject. I guess I am in that age where I am conscious of my incompetence in the topic. As I understand it, civics is the branch of political science that addresses the rights and duties of citizens, and how the government operates.

Civics-related topics make up a good chunk of the ocean here at ATS, and I stand at their shores. Maybe I scoop up a little water now and then, but I certainly can't keep it from trickling out of my cupped hands. I'd like to begin building a boat.

So this thread is a simple question to anyone inclined to be helpful. Where would you recommend one begin a "structured" approach to civics-related topics? What books should I read, where should I focus my efforts? Like anything that one might want to learn in earnest, civics is broad, and any sincere advice in narrowing my initial efforts receives my gratitude in advance.




posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses
Read just about anything non-fiction Gerry Spence has written. He will give you a good basic knowledge without any party bias. He is disgusted by both parties.



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: diggindirt

That's great. I've never heard of Mr. Spence but readily found this quote from "How to Argue and Win Every Time".


While birds can fly, only humans can argue. Argument is the affirmation of our being. It is the principal instrument of human intercourse. Without argument the species would perish. As a subtle suggestion, it is the means by which we aid another. As a warning, it steers us from danger. As exposition, it teaches. As an expression of creativity, it is the gift of ourselves. As a protest, it struggles for justice. As a reasoned dialogue, it resolves disputes. As an assertion of self, it engenders respect. As an entreaty of love, it expresses our devotion. As a plea, it generates mercy. As charismatic oration it moves multitudes and changes history. We must argue — to help, to warn, to lead, to love, to create, to learn, to enjoy justice — to be.


Beautifully articulated. I'm going to check him out. Thanks.



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

I would start with philosophy. With such an approach, given time, you'll find that you'll possess the principles a civic life is founded upon. Begin at Plato, move from there, deviate now and then.



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

Exactly what I'm looking for! Thank you sir.

This is unrelated, but one of your stories inspired me to write something one night. Certain folks have laughed until they cried, that is independently verified. To others it would amount to sub-slapstick idiocy. It is littered with carefully crafted errors of every stripe and lots of readers assume it is a genuine letter, rather than the character study I intended. I'll let you decide, if you're so inclined.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

I liked him because he writes at a level that a beginner can understand and will lead you to other studies.



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 07:52 PM
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I'd start with Social Psychology. How people behave in groups, the sciences behind it we've figured out so far, is essential in such a quest. A study of topics such as Political Science merely scratch at the surface symptoms of whats really going on with people (in groups).

edit on 14-6-2018 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 07:55 PM
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Federalist papers.



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 07:57 PM
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a reply to: loam

Anti-Federalist Papers.




posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 08:09 PM
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Go libertarian, and then try to hang onto all of your rights... You’ll learn a lot.



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 08:14 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

The Cosmos by Carl Sagan.

No, seriously. If you want to open your mind on how humans think and indulge into the universe it's a perfect start to how people on a societal and community level begins.
The way I see it, is that if you start from the basics, you can understand the more complex.



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 10:36 PM
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Social civics apply too

Our personalities are made up of how we perceive our surroundings in the social bit. Inside our minds we have the interpersonal skills but then we have our intrapersonal ego I guess.

Our minds work in our people surroundings by math yep all the math, and our visual interpretations and that has to do with being spatial, that helps us and things like operating a crane or doing Networks.
and
then there's the musical sector of our brain self-explanatory huh.

So deep down in our conscious, we're thinking about the others what we're doing with our inner self is that ego realizing this is how our mind works god-given of course, supposedly we all have all the sectors but I hear we're supposed to pick one our favorite one and grow it
edit on 14-6-2018 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-6-2018 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2018 @ 11:56 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

See if you can take a course at your local community college. I wish I had more free time to drop in on classes.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 02:16 AM
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originally posted by: DictionaryOfExcuses
Hi ATS.

Cutting to the chase: My background in civics is weak, and as I mature (slowly; not bragging) I am drawn more to the subject. I guess I am in that age where I am conscious of my incompetence in the topic. As I understand it, civics is the branch of political science that addresses the rights and duties of citizens, and how the government operates.

Civics-related topics make up a good chunk of the ocean here at ATS, and I stand at their shores. Maybe I scoop up a little water now and then, but I certainly can't keep it from trickling out of my cupped hands. I'd like to begin building a boat.

So this thread is a simple question to anyone inclined to be helpful. Where would you recommend one begin a "structured" approach to civics-related topics? What books should I read, where should I focus my efforts? Like anything that one might want to learn in earnest, civics is broad, and any sincere advice in narrowing my initial efforts receives my gratitude in advance.


Keep it Simple.

Vote. I don't care who you vote for, just get your ass to the voting both in EVERY ELECTION.

The rest is bells and whistles.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

Unfortunately this is one option that probably is far down the list for me.

I've attempted college something like 6 times. I have "special needs", for want of better term, and it always ends poorly. Without medication, it's stressful enough for me to be in close proximity people that it disrupts my ability to function very well, so it's always a crapshoot whether I will make it through term or not. It's more like very expensive cognitive-behavioral therapy; perhaps it is healthy to push my boundaries in this way occasionally, but it gets hard to justify after throwing away money several times. I've tried the Pharma route thrice and I'm through with it forever.

I have considered online classes but at that point it seems just as effective to go to the library. It's far cheaper, too, even if I keep the books like five times past their due. (I am a bad library patron, but a good customer.) One thing I've done is to get a book from the library, and after reading it, contact an instructor from the CC in my area to ask if they will make up an essay topic for me. I talked to one that was flabbergasted that I contacted her for this purpose and she was very helpful.
edit on 6/15/2018 by DictionaryOfExcuses because: (no reason given)

edit on 6/15/2018 by DictionaryOfExcuses because: (no reason given)







 
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