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Primitive Navigation Techniques

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posted on Apr, 15 2018 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: toms54

I tried to edit my post to add a link but the page wouldn't allow it. So here it is:

www.ancient-origins.net...




posted on Apr, 15 2018 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: blend57

Nice thread.

Something about animal navigation which you may have omitted purposefully: Animals also use the earth's magnetic field for navigation and sometimes orientation. (Ever wonder why all the cows in the field are facing the same way? Or why your dog tends to align himself in a particular orientation when he/she poops?)



Magnetoreception (also magnetoception) is a sense which allows an organism to detect a magnetic field to perceive direction, altitude or location. This sensory modality is used by a range of animals for orientation and navigation,[1] and as a method for animals to develop regional maps. For the purpose of navigation, magnetoreception deals with the detection of the Earth's magnetic field.

Magnetoreception is present in bacteria, arthropods, molluscs and members of all major taxonomic groups of vertebrates.[1] Humans are not thought to have a magnetic sense, but there is a protein (a cryptochrome) in the eye which could serve this function.[2]


Magnetoreception

Linky Thing

dolphins and magnetism

I'm wondering if there's a gene that can be turned on for this...
magnetoreception in humans

But honestly the sun and stars are one's best bet. I used to be able to tell the time by the sun's position...usually accurate to within 15 minutes...this can help you navigate by knowing which direction you're traveling. Stars can help you as well, as long as you know what time of year it is and you're familiar with the general location of the stars at a particular time of year and particular time of night.



posted on Apr, 15 2018 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: kelbtalfenek

It is an interesting question you pose, do humans have magnetoreception? The article you linked seems to hint that we do. Something that I will have to explore.

And yes, I left that out purposely because I wanted to use things that everyone/animal had access to. Tools that you could use basically anywhere to find your way in a survival situation. But I'm glad you brought it into the conversation.

Thanks for the links and comments!


originally posted by: toms54
a reply to: blend57

A couple of months ago I saw an article about the Polynesians on how they could go to all these islands in the Pacific. I wish I could find it again and link to it. Basically, some of them trained through a kind of apprenticeship to read the ocean waves They say they are able to "feel" the currents and detect far away islands using the reflections of waves from distant shores. Apparently it's a dying art. Only one or two people are still around that can do this.

They also made maps using sticks in a kind of a grid pattern with other sticks inserted to indicate currents and islands.


I saw that as well. Pretty cool and would be useful to navigate if you are always visiting the same areas. I think I read that only one now (as of the date of the article) has the knowledge. But he is teaching the younger generation so hopefully there will be more in the future. Hate to see this type of knowledge get lost. Thanks for taking the time to look up and share the link!

a reply to: RAY1990

I don't have much to contribute but I will say this, we are animals too and despite what we have forgotten we still have the internal mechanisms for navigation.

I loved the Darwin quote, I've had very similar thoughts on the subject. I've been fascinated with the idea of a sense of direction for a while.


That quote kind of fits with what the other two posters are saying.. About being able to navigate by the feel of the waves and human Magnetoreception sense (sixth sense). It would be interesting if they could prove that we do have these capabilities. I know the one link kelbtalfenek (thank you) linked said that this "sixth sense" had been found. Worth a read through if you get a chance!


originally posted by: TNMockingbird
a reply to: blend57
It's putting a stick in the ground and using pebbles to get your coordinates, then if you've researched the area that you are in beforehand you can hopefully find that river to the north or road or where the town was on your way to your current location...I'll try to find something on that and send you the link.


I thought about including that one. It seems to be helpful. A friend of mine also said you could use your watch to do the same. I should probably have included it...but the OP was already 6 posts long...so I'm glad you and the other members added some additional ways to navigate without a map and compass. It really is valuable information and makes the thread a ton better!

Thanks everyone, I enjoyed reading through the links and your comments!

blend






edit on 15-4-2018 by blend57 because: Always an Edit! :/



posted on Apr, 15 2018 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: blend57

i was a test subject [ one of thousands ] in a university study into human magentic sense

one of the tests was to have a magnet [ or brass bar ] we didnt know which strapped to our heads - and then loaded onto a coach with the curtains closed - and driven round

once stopped - we had to ATTEMPT to draw a map of the journey AND ndicate north [ reative to bus centre line ]

this was 1987 [ we was pressganged into it ]

never did see the results




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