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17 century Houseguests Slaughtered Hosts.

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posted on Mar, 19 2018 @ 09:28 AM
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17 century Houseguests Slaughtered Hosts, and Archaeologists Are Investigating


For the chief of a 17th-century Scottish clan, missing a deadline was nothing to shrug off. In fact, on Feb. 13, 1692, when he failed to swear his oath of allegiance to the king on time — possibly held back by a blizzard — a massacre ensued. Soldiers killed dozens of men, women and children who were part of the Clan MacDonald of Glencoe.



In early February of 1692, two companies of soldiers, comprising about 120 men, came to Glencoe and were billeted in the settlements throughout the valley, in groups of three to five. (The duty to house government troops for a time was a common form of taxation, Alexander said.)

But on Feb. 13, after the soldiers had stayed almost two weeks in the MacDonald homes, the companies' commanding officer, Robert Campbell of Glenlyon, carried out secret orders to "put all to the sword" in Glencoe.
www.livescience.com...


This was way worst than the Red Wedding scene from G O T.

Missing a deadline for any reason and you are done, but as the article said the King and especially his minions were looking for any excuse, IMHO on time or delayed such massacre was certain to occur.
Religious hatred, well thank the gods us moderns no longer subscribed to such nonsense.
edit on 19-3-2018 by Spider879 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 19 2018 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: Spider879

'Never trust a Campbell', was a phrase that ran through the following centuries due to those events.



posted on Mar, 19 2018 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: midicon

Wow!! But basically all is good now,right?? hatred and the thirst for vengeance can run very very deep.



posted on Mar, 19 2018 @ 09:59 AM
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originally posted by: midicon
a reply to: Spider879

'Never trust a Campbell', was a phrase that ran through the following centuries due to those events.




Yep, both clans to this day still have a love hate relationship going on.

Clan Campbell and Clan MacDonald - The Great Feud

www.heartoscotland.com...

Kindest respects

Lags



posted on Mar, 19 2018 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: Lagomorphe

I grew up knowing that phrase lol...



posted on Mar, 19 2018 @ 10:37 AM
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originally posted by: Lagomorphe

originally posted by: midicon
a reply to: Spider879

'Never trust a Campbell', was a phrase that ran through the following centuries due to those events.




Yep, both clans to this day still have a love hate relationship going on.

Clan Campbell and Clan MacDonald - The Great Feud

www.heartoscotland.com...

Kindest respects

Lags

Thanks for the very informative link, there was much more depth than just religious bigotry.

The Clan Donald traces its roots to the great 12th century Gaelic-Norse warrior king, Somerled. His name meant "summer wanderer" and was the name given to the Vikings, who at that time controlled much of the western Isles. Somerled defeated them, adding their territories to his own lands in Argyll. Reginald, his son, styled himself King of the Isles, while his son, Donald of Islay, gave his name to the clan.



When Robert the Bruce fought for his crown, the MacDonald chief unfortunately chose to support the Comyn. Losing his life, and his son's as well, a brother, Angus Og, threw his support to Bruce, and thereby gained the clan lands and titles. This appears to be the only intelligent political move the MacDonald's made for about 500 hundred yearhtmwww.heartoscotland.com...



posted on Mar, 19 2018 @ 03:40 PM
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originally posted by: Spider879
Religious hatred, well thank the gods us moderns no longer subscribed to such nonsense.

More political than religious. This was a famous event which gets a long chapter in Macaulay's History, and a book by John Prebble, among many other places.
To cut a long story short, the centuries-old rivalries between highland clans had got crystallised into a division between pro-Stuart and anti-Stuart factions. Following the "revolution" of 1688 the government in Edinburgh was in the hands of the national anti-Stuarts, and they planned the attack with the probably nominal approval of the Dutch-born William III, who was now king of Scotland as well as king of England.

On the missing ofthe deadline, the story goes that the clan leader deliberately left his submission to the very last minute, and then accidentally went to the wrong place. While the Campbell soldiers were operating as a government unit, it was also the case that MacDonalds in general and Campbells had been rivals for many generations. The MacIan MacDonalds of Glencoe were thought to be appropriate "examples" because the government side had always regarded them as a band of lawless brigands.

The legends of clan warfare are full of stories containing all sorts of horrors. One island clan group died when their enemies lit a fire at the mouth of the cave where they were hiding. And guess why a certain well is called "The well of the heads".
edit on 19-3-2018 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2018 @ 11:28 PM
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I’m a Campbell, whenever I visit Scotland I’m reminded not to say that to loudly. A bad time might be had. My grandfather who was not a Campbell, said we were a bunch o murdering bastards!



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:06 AM
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Golden arches or soup?

Amazing.




posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:09 AM
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a reply to: Spider879

It was a political hit.

They were a threat.

What's the prob?


Anastasia screamed in vain...

Happened all through history.

Meh.




posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:56 AM
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originally posted by: burgerbuddy
a reply to: Spider879

It was a political hit.

They were a threat.

What's the prob?


Anastasia screamed in vain...

Happened all through history.

Meh.



Pleased to meet you...



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