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Safety regulations to prevent another Deepwater disaster thrown out today!

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posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 01:57 PM
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Dead birds and tar balls?? I'm truly astounded! These companies make billions and billions& destroy the environment in the process
the least we should demand is for the wells to be properly built and not take shortcuts to gain in the short-term
generations from now when the ocean is barren our progeny will curse us for our shortsightedness while the whole of them expire. Unless you secretly have another planet up your sleeve. Then nah not even then




posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: TheJesuit

The good ole screw you jack I'm doing fine attitude is alive and well.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7
That statement is a load of poop right there. We are not in the seventies, we do not dump raw sewage into the water anymore and the bay has made quite a comeback. I walked out into it for quite a bit during Hurricane Irma in fact. See all that sea grass that was not there for the last few decades?? yea, it came back! That is not from being 110% poop water! Not to mention the shrimp are also returning with it. I can catch my whatever bait shrimp I want for fishing by casting a net right off the boat launch only about a mile up from this point I took the video.


besides, we saw no harm from the BP spill. The way the Bay is formed, even a disaster like that would leave us relatively safe. Can't say the same for St. Pete, Clearwater, Tarpon Springs, NPR, Bradenton etc.. etc..



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: Wayfarer

You forgot another "side" which I think is important.

Human life.

We don't live outside the environment, and wisdom and science both show we are intimately connected to our environment- air, water, soil, sun - destruction of the environment means ultimately destroying our ability to live as our environment will no longer support us. It isn't about keeping "the environment sacrosanct above all else" but about not making money/the economy more important than the survival of life on the planet.




posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: AboveBoard

Blimey when it happened ats went bonkers against the oil companies we even had a special forum to do with it all.
We are so close to screwing up the sea and if the lack of regulation cause environmental disasters well that's on the administration.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: Bramble Iceshimmer




I'm kind of selfish, I want the A/C and heat to be economical,


Why don't you wrap all of your duct work and furnace in some good ol asbestos. That has good insulating properties...Or is that just a little bit too close to home?



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: Wayfarer

You elucidate the situation clearly. We are currently operating under two opposing premises, both valid if each discounts the other premise. Replies in this thread support your observation. Those who are for regulations see the environment as primary while those who see jobs as primary support deregulation leaving the fate of the environment to some messianic invention to come down the pike some time in the future.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: TerryMcGuire
Hey! I recycle. And I turn off the faucet when brushing my teeth and lathering my hands. Sometimes, I even pee twice in the bowl before flushing sometimes. What else you want?

This may come as a shocker, but every month I take my kids to a lake or pond and clean up the garbage
OMG right?



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 03:34 PM
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Those are practices that I share also that you ask what do I want. What I want is to not leave the fate of our environment to those who don't care like you and I seem to. When the profit motive of the corporations are allowed to exceed their safety for the environment around them that's when the people need to have regulatory powers over them to: worldstarcountry



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 06:04 PM
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a reply to: TerryMcGuire
well, I am just fine with it. But if I did have a problem, I would probably start with contacting my representatives or at the very least show up to the local city council meetings to express my thoughts there to the people who can make a difference in my community. Then, I may devise a plan to help me generate wealth with a business or businesses over the remaining span of my life so that I would have the power to lobby said representatives with the only thing they listen to, which is $$$ . Then I would entrust these efforts and resources to my heir and educate them on the importance of continuing our legacy of saving the planet and such, or at the very least our most immediate environment where we are directly impacted. From there , it is up to the next generation.

But hey, thats just an idea I vainly try to work on myself. But I try none the less.

You know how the system works. Use it, exploit it to seek your goals. Cattle require somebody to herd them around to the right places. All you need to do is to show them you are more powerful and they will follow. Thus is the human condition since the beginning of creation.

The end. wow, I am such a debbie downer.



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 10:43 AM
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originally posted by: roadgravel
Deepwater Horizon - with all the experience and technology, decisions with possible deadly outcomes were still made by a guess. Damn the protocols, full speed ahead to the bank.


There were a whole load of lawsuits relating to the case. First one was that they subcontracted the construction of the concrete lining to another company. Halliburton had given them two cost options with different probabilties of failure; 1 in 100,000 vs 1. in 1000,000 . For an accountant or project manager, those are meaningless.

They were dealing with huge pressures at that depth 30,000 feet down, over 120,000 psi. Aircraft tyres are at 200 psi or more and the service vehicles at 3000 psi. So when something happened, it happened fast. They had state-of-the-art real-time monitoring of the drill head but that wasn't available to the oil-rig crews, or they weren't checking. They had emergency cutoffs like blow-out preventers and shear-rams that would normally shut down regular wells, but the high pressure pushed up the drill parts so fast, they jammed in the well, disabling everything.



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 10:46 AM
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Yeah, time to show Mother Nature who’s boss.



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 11:26 AM
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originally posted by: Bramble Iceshimmer
a reply to: TheJesuit

S$$$ happens. Yeah, companies have engineers and managers make a risk assessment and management has a thumb on that scale but society demands cheap gas and energy.

I'm kind of selfish, I want the A/C and heat to be economical, I want the lights to come on when I flip the switch, reasonable prices for food and junk from Wally World or the local grocery. When I still had a car, i wanted to fill the tank without getting a loan.

So, if the price of all of that is some dead birds, dead sea creatures and tar balls on a beach that's OK. The company and government will clean most of it up and insurance will pay for a lot of it.

Rinse and repeat.

I sure don't want a $5,000 a month electric bill or $100.00 / gallon gas due to excessive regulation on production and exploitation of our resources.


What has happened to your energy costs since these regulations were first put in?



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 12:11 PM
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originally posted by: sligtlyskeptical

originally posted by: Bramble Iceshimmer
a reply to: TheJesuit

S$$$ happens. Yeah, companies have engineers and managers make a risk assessment and management has a thumb on that scale but society demands cheap gas and energy.

I'm kind of selfish, I want the A/C and heat to be economical, I want the lights to come on when I flip the switch, reasonable prices for food and junk from Wally World or the local grocery. When I still had a car, i wanted to fill the tank without getting a loan.

So, if the price of all of that is some dead birds, dead sea creatures and tar balls on a beach that's OK. The company and government will clean most of it up and insurance will pay for a lot of it.

Rinse and repeat.

I sure don't want a $5,000 a month electric bill or $100.00 / gallon gas due to excessive regulation on production and exploitation of our resources.



What has happened to your energy costs since these regulations were first put in?


They've risen at the normal rate (so in effect nothing discernible).



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: Wayfarer

originally posted by: sligtlyskeptical

originally posted by: Bramble Iceshimmer
a reply to: TheJesuit

S$$$ happens. Yeah, companies have engineers and managers make a risk assessment and management has a thumb on that scale but society demands cheap gas and energy.

I'm kind of selfish, I want the A/C and heat to be economical, I want the lights to come on when I flip the switch, reasonable prices for food and junk from Wally World or the local grocery. When I still had a car, i wanted to fill the tank without getting a loan.

So, if the price of all of that is some dead birds, dead sea creatures and tar balls on a beach that's OK. The company and government will clean most of it up and insurance will pay for a lot of it.

Rinse and repeat.

I sure don't want a $5,000 a month electric bill or $100.00 / gallon gas due to excessive regulation on production and exploitation of our resources.



What has happened to your energy costs since these regulations were first put in?


They've risen at the normal rate (so in effect nothing discernible).


Then how are you stating that the regulations which have been in place for 6 years make your energy costs go up?



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 01:03 PM
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originally posted by: sligtlyskeptical

originally posted by: Wayfarer

originally posted by: sligtlyskeptical

originally posted by: Bramble Iceshimmer
a reply to: TheJesuit

S$$$ happens. Yeah, companies have engineers and managers make a risk assessment and management has a thumb on that scale but society demands cheap gas and energy.

I'm kind of selfish, I want the A/C and heat to be economical, I want the lights to come on when I flip the switch, reasonable prices for food and junk from Wally World or the local grocery. When I still had a car, i wanted to fill the tank without getting a loan.

So, if the price of all of that is some dead birds, dead sea creatures and tar balls on a beach that's OK. The company and government will clean most of it up and insurance will pay for a lot of it.

Rinse and repeat.

I sure don't want a $5,000 a month electric bill or $100.00 / gallon gas due to excessive regulation on production and exploitation of our resources.



What has happened to your energy costs since these regulations were first put in?


They've risen at the normal rate (so in effect nothing discernible).


Then how are you stating that the regulations which have been in place for 6 years make your energy costs go up?


I'm not stating it.

I would surmise that those who believe so think there is a cost associated with following the regulations and that cost was passed onto consumers.

Of course its a tricky thing to separate cost increases into enough granularity to determine what was the driving motivator for the increase, and as I mentioned above the cost increases were in line with the standard rate (adjusted for inflation), so it would not seem like costs jumped appreciably from the regulations.




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