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UC Berkeley/SETI - Breakthrough Project - How To Find ET

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posted on Dec, 25 2017 @ 08:51 AM
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The project is seeking volunteers to help with data analysis. Data from the Grand Banks Telescope is available to anyone who is experienced in Python. Could be interesting for anyone who has the time and resources to help with chunks of data which require analysis. But even if you can't participate, the links in the documentation are worthwhile exploring.

github.com...



How to get started If you are interested in helping with this effort, here's some background information to get you started. How to get access to the data Some, but not all, of the data are available in the BL archive at breakthroughinitiatives.org... To access GBT data, select "BL at Green Bank" from the projects drop-down, and optionally a target name. Note that this will return large numbers of files with filetype listed as "baseband data". These are the raw voltage files. Until you already have extensive experience using filterbank files, it would be best to avoid these baseband files at first, and stick to some of the example filterbank files (those with a .fil extension) at setiathome.berkeley.edu... If you are developing pipelines to compare features between filterbank files, you may wish to test these with a larger set of data. We've made a subsample of the filterbank files from our analysis in Enriquez et al. (2017) available at blpd0.ssl.berkeley.edu... - there's a total of 16 TB of high frequency resolution filterbanks here. We recommend only downloading these if you have fully explored a smaller subset of the filterbank data. We can provide more filterbank data where these came from on request, and will be making more of the data available online in due course.





How to find ET This README is intended as an introduction to anyone with experience programming in Python who is interested in delving deeper into analysis of data from the Green Bank Telescope. It assumes little or no knowledge of radio astronomy or of techniques used in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Intended audiences include those who may be interested in running machine learning or other sophisticated analyses on Breakthrough Listen data. First, if you haven't already read the five-page introduction on our webpage, please visit seti.berkeley.edu/listen (you can gloss over the parts about optical SETI and the Automated Planet Finder on page 3, and on the second halves of pages 4 and 5). We're going to concentrate on radio searches here, specifically those that we're doing with the 100-meter diameter Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia - the largest fully-steerable radio telescope on the planet. When you're comfortable with the material on seti.berkeley.edu, come back here and we'll get into more of the details. As noted in the introductory materials, the basics of searching for signatures of extraterrestrial technology are actually quite simple, but the confounding factors are: Human technology gives off signals like the ones we are looking for (radio frequency interference) Data volumes are too large to run brute force analysis on the whole dataset




posted on Dec, 25 2017 @ 11:57 AM
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Berkeley and tracking space aliens you say?

The machine requires this fuel source:






posted on Dec, 26 2017 @ 04:28 AM
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I'm not a programmer .......but for Christmas from my Sister and nieces i received a certificate with a star that's been named after me. So, it would seem i'll be having a poke around at this to see what my name has been put too. Thankyou so much for the link, great timing.



posted on Dec, 26 2017 @ 07:36 AM
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Berkeley?



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