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Police investigate hack of guns database

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posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 08:55 AM
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This is a story from our brothers "down under" in OZ, and is an example of one reason those of us in the U.S. resist a national firearms registry. With the number of recent public news stories of government (and private) data breaches, the thought of having the "bad guys" know which homes have firearms is yet another concern.



Police are investigating the hacking of a gun club database that may have exposed where more than 1500 semi-automatic handguns are stored.

The private details of 540 members from the Port Melbourne club, including the types of weapons they owned, is believed to have been compromised this month, potentially exposing them to the theft of guns worth at least $5000 each on the black market.

Most members own multiple guns, and store them in their homes.

Source: Police investigate hack of guns database

But, you may say, "why worry if you are armed, or why not just not have it to be a target?" For those that live in a built-up area (regardless of country), with rapid emergency call response times (i.e. 911 in the U.S), that might be a viable option for you. However, as the below example shows, this does not apply to everyone living in rural areas.

Gun thieves have repeatedly been found to have stolen to order and supply the underworld, but police have previously denied that the thieves used information stolen from police or gun club databases. This is despite numerous examples, particularly on farms and other remote locations, of properties with guns being ransacked while neighbouring properties that do not have registered firearms are left untouched.


Any wonder why we resist, given our countries beginnings where the British Empire attempted to confiscate the weapons stored in Concord, MA by their regular army that was garrisoned in Boston?

Yes, this has happened in Australia, a country that has all but tried to ban personal ownership of firearms, and requires registration of those that do have them. Yet, no protections are in place to keep this information out of the hands of criminals? No legal requirement to encrypt the data at rest? It sure seems to me like an way to enable easy confiscation or encourage theft. Could that be on purpose to further the anti-gun agenda?



edit on 11/20/2017 by Krakatoa because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 09:26 AM
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Your average thugs do not hack nor know crap about hacking. I wonder if this leads deeper. Maybe .gov needs some weapons for a FF.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 09:33 AM
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originally posted by: iTruthSeeker
Your average thugs do not hack nor know crap about hacking. I wonder if this leads deeper. Maybe .gov needs some weapons for a FF.


That might be true, however, they are the target market for the information. Wouldn't you agree?



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: Krakatoa



If indeed they launch an investigation, they won't have to cast a far and wide seine...

Here I'll do it...

"Hey Mate, go down to IT and tell those blokes someone found out they hacked the database again..."

Sure Sarge...



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 10:03 AM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker
Your average thugs do not hack nor know crap about hacking


9x out of 10 it usually ends up being a disgruntled employee or some imbecile that gives out the password , then they'll blame it on some foreign assemblage to cover for their incompetence...



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 10:23 AM
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originally posted by: Tellurian


a reply to: iTruthSeeker
Your average thugs do not hack nor know crap about hacking


9x out of 10 it usually ends up being a disgruntled employee or some imbecile that gives out the password , then they'll blame it on some foreign assemblage to cover for their incompetence...


Maybe. It just reminds me of how weapons went "missing" in fast and furious and ended up on the streets. Now the circumstances here are obviously much different but it just kinda reminded me of that.



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