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Food aggression Fat cat

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posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:42 PM
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a reply to: misterhistory

Why feed them separately? We have two cats, and did not obtain them at the same time. One was brought in later, about 3/4 grown, and they had to adapt to one another. We simply introduced them, then backed away. A little hissing, some fuss, and within a day they were good buddies. They share a food bowl, and a single litter box, with no issues. Both get attention when they want it, and they have toys they prefer, but they decide that, not us. They do have a couple of preferences for sleeping, and one prefers the teen son's room, which the other avoids, but again, their choice, not ours. The other one prefers our bed, or that of one of the girls. The other girl's bed, they both will sleep on. Go figure.

As for feeding, I have never, ever, fed cats on any schedule. Dry food sits out, and is there when they want it. Refilled as needed, so it stays fresh, and they don't overeat at all. The overweight cat (and some can weigh 18+ pounds and not be overweight) as likely suffering from a lack of exercise, more than too much food. Allowing him to play with the other one, encouraging more movement, is the best way to combat that.

I do note, now, that you mentioned the previous owner of the fat cat might have overfed him, and that can take time to counter, but leaving out a bowl of dry isn't likely to hurt anything. If you aren't feeding him other foods, his weight should adjust in time. That the other cat wants to be around him also indicates that they aren't as aggressive toward one another as you might think. Sometimes, when our two play, the older one (smaller, lighter) fusses at the younger, and backs him off, because he doesn't seem to want to play, you'd think, but moments later, he's chasing the younger one around, having a blast. Never one have they hurt one another. On another note, the younger one, who is larger, will wait to eat of the older is, assuming it's his right or something, we suppose, to go first.

As long as you give each equal attention, they ought to be alright together. For litter boxes, clean regularly, and hopefully that will settle down.




posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 07:03 PM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

There are some cats who cannot free feed. We found that out with our fat cat. They will become like little addicts. It has to do with the grain in the dry food or something. They will eat and eat and not ever feel satisfied, sort of like people.

So when you get one like that, you have to ration their food out.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 10:34 PM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

It is food aggression from the fat one; very defensive about his food and very much going after the others food, he’s not like a maine coon just your standard gray cat with white features and socks for paws with lack of energy and breathing issues from being overweight. As the fat one looses weight, he’s been gaining confidence to go higher and is more active. The food aggression by one is making the other get a little territorial about the toilets for some reason so he marks them or goes outside of it to show displeasure with me. Also, they play fight so often it’s actually a little concerning that I don’t break it up but rather start throwing toys for them to play with instead.



posted on Nov, 7 2017 @ 01:38 AM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

There are some cats who cannot free feed. We found that out with our fat cat. They will become like little addicts. It has to do with the grain in the dry food or something. They will eat and eat and not ever feel satisfied, sort of like people.

So when you get one like that, you have to ration their food out.


This is true. Never had one of those, but it can be a problem. In that case, food would have to be set out at a certain time for both, to avoid the rivalry. The one who isn't a problem eater might not like it, but till the other changes, not much to do, other than isolating him, which seems to be not working as well.



posted on Nov, 7 2017 @ 03:00 AM
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For the record I read the whole thing and I don't know anything about cats but this is what I would do. I would also recommend actually talking to a vet.

I wasn't aware that cats needed to have food left out all the time.

When I've taken care of a cat, I gave it food, it ate it supervised, then went off to do cat stuff.

I've had dogs for a long time, grew up with horses, if there was food aggression you just stood there and sort of shooed the offending party away.

Are you just always leaving the bowls full? This would explain a fat cat. There's no excuse for a fat animal. Same with children. You're overfeeding if they're fat, and you alone control it.

My dog gets two meals a day. One in the morning, one at night. Have you seen a fat dog? The owners just leave pour food in whenever the bowl is full or feed them an obscene amount of table scraps/dog treats. If I had two, I'd feed them at the same time, make sure they both finished, then let them out. Talk to a vet about how much you should decrease the feeding of the fat cat. Start feeding them only when you're home, then take away the food dishes.

Man I love animals, and always want them to have a loving home. It sounds like you're a great guy. Perhaps she should consider surrendering one of the cats.

Good luck.




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