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Need advice for getting a new dog and existing dog to get along

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posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:27 PM
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We have had Gracie (German Shepard) since she was a puppy. She is about 2.5 years old. We live on a ranch and she has free run of the place.

Yesterday we adopted a male German Shepard, Oso. He is about 1.5 years old, and a little bigger than Gracie.

We made the mistake of introducing them on Gracie's home turf, and now they are both aggressive toward each other. We have not been able to take them off leash together yet, don't want to risk them hurting each other.

Both dogs are friendly to us, so it's not just a "bad dog". Neither dog is used to being around other dogs.

What's the best course of action here? How do we get them acclimated? Our goal is that they are both able to run free on our property.
edit on 10/11/17 by AnonymousCitizen because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:33 PM
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originally posted by: AnonymousCitizen
We have had Gracie (German Shepard) since she was a puppy. She is about 2.5 years old. We live on a ranch and she has free run of the place.

Yesterday we adopted a male German Shepard, Oso. He is about 1.5 years old, and a little bigger than Gracie.

We made the mistake of introducing them on Gracie's home turf, and now they are both aggressive toward each other. We have not been able to take them off leash together yet, don't want to risk them hurting each other.

Both dogs are friendly to us, so it's not just a "bad dog". Neither dog is used to being around other dogs.

What's the best course of action here? How do we get them acclimated? Our goal is that they are both able to run free on our property.


Take them out for a walk, with you in the middle. BE the pack alpha....let them know it. They are both vying for placement in the pack. It is up to the pack alpha (you) to show them where they reside.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:37 PM
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This exactly. End thread.

a reply to: Krakatoa



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:44 PM
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a reply to: AnonymousCitizen

Maybe it's a German thing, they are trying to impress each other. Wait for mating season, a bottle of red wine and Tony Bennett under the moon.
edit on 11-10-2017 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

Germans prefer white wine and they dont like tony bennet



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:52 PM
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originally posted by: Aeshma
a reply to: Trueman

Germans prefer white wine and they dont like tony bennet


A stein of beir and Wagner?



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:53 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa


can i pet your hair.... i mean ech ehm .. that would suffice.

edit on PMAmerica/Chicago440710pm by Aeshma because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: AnonymousCitizen

Let them work it out with out any human interference . She will put him straight and he will come to be the best guard dog you could ever imagine ... I am curious as to there sexual standing ...fixed , not fixed ?



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 08:07 PM
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originally posted by: Krakatoa

originally posted by: Aeshma
a reply to: Trueman

Germans prefer white wine and they dont like tony bennet


A stein of beir and Wagner?

I'm not German but that sounds good. Add some sausage.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 08:09 PM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
a reply to: AnonymousCitizen

I am curious as to there sexual standing ...fixed , not fixed ?

LOL, that's personal.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 08:11 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

100%

Same with any resource guarding. They don't own the food. You do.

If you do this right, they will be over it in a matter of a few days.

Make them sit and stay for anything that comes next. Never (at least for now) let them decide who goes first with anything. You decide...which also means you need to decide which of the two will always come before the other. That may sound crappy, but the truth is they show each other aggression now because of the uncertainty of their respective positions.

When you get through this period, they will be fast friends. Plus it's easier with opposite gendered dogs.

Good luck.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 08:19 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

Hey man those things can make a difference down the road .:>) Actually they are about the age that maybe the fighting was only love bites :>)



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 08:19 PM
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originally posted by: loam
a reply to: Krakatoa

100%

Same with any resource guarding. They don't own the food. You do.

If you do this right, they will be over it in a matter of a few days.

Make them sit and stay for anything that comes next. Never (at least for now) let them decide who goes first with anything. You decide...which also means you need to decide which of the two will always come before the other. That may sound crappy, but the truth is they show each other aggression now because of the uncertainty of their respective positions.

When you get through this period, they will be fast friends. Plus it's easier with opposite gendered dogs.

Good luck.


Yup, and most important is to be consistent, especially with the feeding order. The higher status canine is always given their food first. Always. Be consistent. Any inconsistency or hesitation will reset the uncertainty and seem to allow an "opening" for the lower canine to attempt a level bump up in the pack.

They are pack animals, regardless of how cute they are. This advice is given out of love and not out of anger. Understand that and the job is easier.

Basically, you need to let them know you are the big dog in the house. It is YOUR pack....not theirs.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 08:48 PM
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You didn't mention if the Shepard has been neutered.

If not, that is the single best thing you can do.

No balls...



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 08:53 PM
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Scare the beejeepers out of both of them at the same time right after they meet.....give em 10 minutes to do the sniff test ect....then pull a funny and scare the daylights out of them both.....it will give them an instant unbreakable common bond when they are both terrified and then immediatly comforted by you...they will forever seek solace in each other due to this bonding dynamic....works with cats and humans why not dogs.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 09:26 PM
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I hate to say this but am speaking from years of experience. I've trained dogs for years. Trying to mesh two alphas is practically impossible-and never leave them alone together.

While you can enforce a truce while with them, when they are left alone together they can and will most likely try to fight it out.

I have had two rescue dogs-they were pups but adopted about 6 months apart. I can never leave them alone together-ever. They eat and sleep in separate rooms-it is a challenge that makes me sad.

Tried everything all the way to professional trainers-some dog temperaments cannot be changed. First time in my life this has ever been the case.

Just wanted to share my experience with two alphas. Hoping for the best for you.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 09:40 PM
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Common experiences create common bonds and when animals meet if there is no immediate common experiences building an immediate common bond....well then everybody begins looking for things that are UNCOMMON and trouble begins to brew....all that emotional pecking order Alpha stuff....by the way I use a Nautical Airhorn to bond my loved ones.....lol.....aint an "Alpha" on this planet who wont tuck and run when I blast that sucker dog/human/feline/avian/ everyone becomes meek when we play bonding games.......because meek rhymes with weak and we must understand weak before we can strive to become strong....alone or in a group....when everyone sees no fear in you and you immediatly comfort and protect both by bellowing in the direction the sound came to fight the dragon just as they are looking back over their shoulder...timing is everything lol....then they will know who Daddy is and who they are....simple swift and sweet with a little giggle on top if you get it on tape.

I currently have a 16lb Trained Watch/Attack TabbyCat.....he is absolutely fearless precise and surgical.....he plays fetch opens doors has baths eat corn off the cob on a plate shakes his paws and does every trick my dogs have ever done effortlessly learning by the 2nd try nearly every time and he verbalises words by mjorking or making unique tabby sounds[he went from weaning to 6 years old before he ever heard or saw another cat and I immediatly ignored his few little meows and taught him to use body contact and language instead when he wanted things and then went from that to my verbals to hand signals to eye signals so the poor guy has never really learned to meow properly but he has his own verbage even growls like a dog lol lol] which come out like words especially the word NO.I have NEVER had an animal teammate work so seamlessly with me.

I must say a willing cat is as quick a learner as a Raven is....it is freaky....especially if you have handled all kinds of domestic and wild animals and also worked in a Zoo as I have.Primates MIGHT internally learn quicker but hold back letting you know....but my oh my cats are very very very smart....they think for themselves and decide to work with you not for you.....huge difference....like Monkeys and Ravens IMHO.



edit on 11-10-2017 by one4all because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: AnonymousCitizen


We made the mistake of introducing them on Gracie's home turf,

You said it. Introdction is everything.

The best way to salvage this is to treat them equal, do everything you do for them equally and at the same exact time.

Feeding time:

Prepare the bowls of food the same and place them separated but still in eye view of each othe, at the same time.

Same with walks , take them both on walks, at the same time.

Pet, brush, talk to them at the same time. If you give one a bone or treat do the same for the other, together.

Most important they should both be loved at the same time. Pet them together, don't favor one over the other, don't prefer one over the other.

This is key to salvage what you mistook for natural selection.

Show your org Shepard that you are accepting the new comer, show the newcomer that you you value them just as much.

You are the pack leader they are subordinates, they will adopt a friendly attitude with each other over time, if you show them both they are equal in your eyes and behavior.

Be consistent, they observe every nuance in your behavior. Observe them together carefully, when one adopts an aggressive stance, ears down, tail lowered, staring bullets, or... if one growls at the other, go Ah-Ah-Ah, really loud. Let them know you disapprove of intolerance.

They'll come around, they're Shepards , they're really smart. They want to run and play together.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 10:12 PM
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Do it right and it will go smooth as silk. Wrong and it will be like the day my wife meet my girlfriend............just kidding, they've never meet.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 10:26 PM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
a reply to: AnonymousCitizen

Let them work it out with out any human interference . She will put him straight and he will come to be the best guard dog you could ever imagine ... I am curious as to there sexual standing ...fixed , not fixed ?


Not fixed. Breeding was one reason for this selection.

Sounds like we are doing a lot of things right. We are taking them on walks together. Feeding them at same time, separate kennels in the barn, of course. Both are obedient and know I'm alpha, but they are still fighting for second place.

It's only been a day and a half, so I'm sure there's a lot of work left to do. Just hoping we are on the right track and this works out. We really want both to have free run of the place.



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