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Gravitational waves discovery wins Nobel of Physics 2017

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posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10




Marcioni essentially stole everything from a Telsa lecture he had attented.
Marconi's patents were voided in the '40's.

False. 2x.

In 1943 a single patent Marconi patent (for a tuning circuit) was overturned and it had nothing to do with Tesla.

So, to recap, the 1943 decision didn't overturn Marconi's original patents, or his reputation as the first person to develop practical radiotelegraphic communication. It just said that the adoption of adjustable transformers in the transmitting and receiving circuits, which was an improvement of the initial invention, was fully anticipated by patents issued to Oliver Lodge and John Stone Stone. (This decision wasn't unanimous, but the dissents sided not with Tesla, but with Marconi.)

earlyradiohistory.us...


edit on 10/18/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 02:12 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: punkinworks10




Marcioni essentially stole everything from a Telsa lecture he had attented.
Marconi's patents were voided in the '40's.

False. 2x.

In 1943 a single patent Marconi patent (for a tuning circuit) was overturned and it had nothing to do with Tesla.

So, to recap, the 1943 decision didn't overturn Marconi's original patents, or his reputation as the first person to develop practical radiotelegraphic communication. It just said that the adoption of adjustable transformers in the transmitting and receiving circuits, which was an improvement of the initial invention, was fully anticipated by patents issued to Oliver Lodge and John Stone Stone. (This decision wasn't unanimous, but the dissents sided not with Tesla, but with Marconi.)

earlyradiohistory.us...



I stand corrected



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: ErosA433

Thanks for the informative reply,
I was under the impression that the gravity wave was created with the release of the energy of the merger.
I have read some arguments that gravitational fields do propogate at supraluminal speeds, but a gravity wave is not a gravity field, duh.
In any case it is all very exciting, and thanks t to you and phage for todays educational exercise.
Dont know if this particular article has been posted,
physics.aps.org...

It is very good,
From the article,


Similarly, the luminosity of the electromagnetic signal and its delay relative to a gravitational wave can be used to probe the physics of gravity (such as the equivalence principle) in ways that were not possible through either type of observation alone.



It would suck to have been in that section of that galaxy when that lit off.

Lets say you were in a galaxy that experienced a gamma ray burst, but far away, what would the gravity wave feel like in such close proximity to the source as it passes?



posted on Oct, 28 2017 @ 02:51 AM
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originally posted by: punkinworks10
Lets say you were in a galaxy that experienced a gamma ray burst, but far away, what would the gravity wave feel like in such close proximity to the source as it passes?


For most practical purposes the radiation would fry you and all your atoms if you were close enough to feel anything gravitationally. But suppose that didn't happen. If you were to feel something it would be a little bit of odd stretching oscillating, like your sides squish and you get a little taller simultaneously and then it reverses. If it's at 100 Hz, it might be a slight buzz in your gut for a few seconds.



posted on Oct, 28 2017 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: mbkennel

The energy released in these events is almost unimaginable.
And if what i have recently read is about this event, it was energetic enough to cause neighboring star systems to glow in the ultra violet.
That galaxy has surely been sterilized.



posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 06:11 AM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

not sure about that... but one thing for sure is this... the 1/r^2 relationship is a protective mistress in many ways.

You read about how supernovae would wipe out all life within a 100ly radius... if you do some simple back of envelope calculations, you would see that the energy impact, and even pressure applied to neighbouring systems... other than the new very very bright star in the sky, the material pushed away from a supernovae would barely be felt once it had reached about 5-10 LY.

The photon bake is obviously a bad one.
A type 1A gives you 1-2E44 J of energy... total.

So lets take a star 10 ly away.... a planet at that distance would receive about 10 GJ per meter square. Quite a lot! A cubic meter of air absorbing all of it would be ionised, reaching a temperature of about 1million kelvin. BUT physics doesn't work quite like that, it would be absorbed as a function of depth, but yep wouldn't very healthy for life, thats for sure.

When you get further away, the situation gets better and better, by about 100 light years, its down at 0.112GJ per meter square. Which is not great but not that sterilizing.

1000 light years away and dare i say... safe?



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