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Autistic man convicted of murder despite not actually doing anything

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posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 11:05 AM
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Alex Henry, who is serving a 19-year prison sentence for murder despite never touching the weapon used

convicted of murder under the joint enterprise law after his friend, Cameron Ferguson, then 19, fatally stabbed Taqui Khezihi, 21

no one present during the fight knew that there had been a stabbing

Source
Here we have a perfect example of how powers given to law enforcement or government can get way out of hand.
An autistic man named Alex Henry was out one day with friends when some sort of altercation broke out between several people. Unbeknownst to him (and everyone present), his friend stabbed someone during the scuffle who later died of his injuries. His friend fully confessed to the murder, but Alex Henry was also arrested, charged, and sentenced to prison for that very murder that he had no part in... Simply because his friend did it and he happened to be in the vicinity of the crime.

Imagine you're out with friends, and one of your friends suddenly stabs or shoots someone, gets arrested, and admits to doing it. The police arrest you, you're found guilty of murder, and you're sentenced to life in prison - because you happened to be there. This is exactly what the police and courts are allowed to do under the joint enterprise law.




posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: trollz


Alex Henry was also arrested, charged, and sentenced to prison for that very murder that he had no part in... Simply because his friend did it and he happened to be in the vicinity of the crime.

I don't know the facts in this case. You didn't present any. In general, if you are in the car when someone commits a felony then yes, you are charged with the crime too.

There is no such defense as I was just along for the ride or I was there, with the guy but didn't have anything to do with it. Unless there is some extenuating circumstances like you tried to stop it, reported it, or didn't go along with a knife toting hot head in the first place...

...you will be charged and convicted too.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 11:25 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

That's not really correct. There has to be a showing that you were involved at some stage. There is no guilt by association. If you had no foreknowledge, did not actively participate or encourage others to participate, and did not help the perpetrator after the event, then you've done nothing wrong.

The cops will charge you, of course. And the prosecutor will prosecute you. But without additional facts, you should be acquitted.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: trollz
It's called "guilt by association". Ask some Aussies on here as I think they are trying to push this law there. It's really meant for the biker gangs ie. one does something and all the gang gets prosecuted.
It's a very slippery slope as just who decides which group to prosecute and which not to.
Bad example:- it's ok when it's a biker group but what happens when it's say a bible group. One in the congregation commits a crime and all in the congregation are guilty.


+5 more 
posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 11:31 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

In general, if you are in the car when someone commits a felony then yes, you are charged with the crime too.

There is no such defense as I was just along for the ride or I was there, with the guy but didn't have anything to do with it. Unless there is some extenuating circumstances like you tried to stop it, reported it, or didn't go along with a knife toting hot head in the first place...

...you will be charged and convicted too.


I'll bet the cop that was sitting in the car next to the officer that murdered that Australian woman won't be charged with anything.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 11:35 AM
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originally posted by: trollz

Alex Henry, who is serving a 19-year prison sentence for murder despite never touching the weapon used

convicted of murder under the joint enterprise law after his friend, Cameron Ferguson, then 19, fatally stabbed Taqui Khezihi, 21

no one present during the fight knew that there had been a stabbing

Source
Here we have a perfect example of how powers given to law enforcement or government can get way out of hand.
An autistic man named Alex Henry was out one day with friends when some sort of altercation broke out between several people. Unbeknownst to him (and everyone present), his friend stabbed someone during the scuffle who later died of his injuries. His friend fully confessed to the murder, but Alex Henry was also arrested, charged, and sentenced to prison for that very murder that he had no part in... Simply because his friend did it and he happened to be in the vicinity of the crime.

Imagine you're out with friends, and one of your friends suddenly stabs or shoots someone, gets arrested, and admits to doing it. The police arrest you, you're found guilty of murder, and you're sentenced to life in prison - because you happened to be there. This is exactly what the police and courts are allowed to do under the joint enterprise law.



Totally absurd,

And yet another reason why I am taking myself out of society in general, zero common sense seems to be the order of the day!!!!.. So now along with a lawyer present when I have sex with a women in case I am accused of rape is not bad enough I cannot be around friends in case I am roped into some BS that I had no part of..

No wonder my phone book is staggeringly small and will shrink further..


RA



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 11:38 AM
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Was anyone else present at the time arrested?



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: intrptr


I don't know the facts in this case. You didn't present any. In general, if you are in the car when someone commits a felony then yes, you are charged with the crime too.


This case happened in the UK so who knows what the law is over there. Near as I can tell, one of the trio supposedly initiated a fight with the deceased, then the other two showed up during the fight and the non-autistic fella started stabbing people in the back.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: crayzeed
a reply to: trollz
It's called "guilt by association". Ask some Aussies on here as I think they are trying to push this law there. It's really meant for the biker gangs ie. one does something and all the gang gets prosecuted.
It's a very slippery slope as just who decides which group to prosecute and which not to.
Bad example:- it's ok when it's a biker group but what happens when it's say a bible group. One in the congregation commits a crime and all in the congregation are guilty.


Yes, its intended purpose is to go after gang activity and organized crime, like a group of people conspiring to rob a store together, during which the store clerk is murdered. But the law is being absolutely abused when it allows for completely innocent people who had nothing to do with the crime to be imprisoned for murder simply because they were in the vicinity.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 12:23 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6
Thanks for the extra info. Sounds like they are all involved, and not in a case of self defense either, if they initiated the fight.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 01:17 PM
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If you are aware that someone is carrying a lethal weapon (knife, revolver, bottle of acid, machete, mace) and has intentions of using it, and you don't inform the authorities, then that makes you an accomplice if a crime is committed.

There was a story where a cheerleader went out for an evening with her brother. He shoots at a homeless guy with a paintball gun. Another homeless guy rushes to protect him and that man gets killed during a fight. She gets prosecuted for being an accomplice.

www.dailymail.co.uk... .html



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 01:18 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: trollz


Alex Henry was also arrested, charged, and sentenced to prison for that very murder that he had no part in... Simply because his friend did it and he happened to be in the vicinity of the crime.

I don't know the facts in this case. You didn't present any. In general, if you are in the car when someone commits a felony then yes, you are charged with the crime too.

There is no such defense as I was just along for the ride or I was there, with the guy but didn't have anything to do with it. Unless there is some extenuating circumstances like you tried to stop it, reported it, or didn't go along with a knife toting hot head in the first place...

...you will be charged and convicted too.


Which is wrong.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 01:33 PM
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a reply to: crayzeed

Correct.I am retired president of a very large motorcycle club,however as laws progressed it was very hard to attend the weekly meetings to have a cup of beer with the brothers when a couple dudes were in the background working on a bad deed that no one was aware of and all there could go down for it.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: redhorse

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: trollz


Alex Henry was also arrested, charged, and sentenced to prison for that very murder that he had no part in... Simply because his friend did it and he happened to be in the vicinity of the crime.

I don't know the facts in this case. You didn't present any. In general, if you are in the car when someone commits a felony then yes, you are charged with the crime too.

There is no such defense as I was just along for the ride or I was there, with the guy but didn't have anything to do with it. Unless there is some extenuating circumstances like you tried to stop it, reported it, or didn't go along with a knife toting hot head in the first place...

...you will be charged and convicted too.


Which is wrong.


"Wrong" as in illegal or immoral ? Or wrong as in, wasn't there, didn't do it, or the laws in UK are different?



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 01:47 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Immoral.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: redhorse

I don't know what part the person with autism played...



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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originally posted by: ericendtimes
a reply to: crayzeed

Correct.I am retired president of a very large motorcycle club,however as laws progressed it was very hard to attend the weekly meetings to have a cup of beer with the brothers when a couple dudes were in the background working on a bad deed that no one was aware of and all there could go down for it.


You were president and not aware, right. If at least not aware of every act, surely aware of 'potential' , depending on your club of course. There are clubs and there are gangs.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: redhorse

I don't know what part the person with autism played...


Well, I don't either. But I can tell you that it is entirely possible to get into a car with someone and have things go terribly sideways and you had no idea that it was going to go that way. If my presence within the vicinity, or in the vehicle is all that was required... well, I'd be in prison.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 01:58 PM
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originally posted by: redhorse

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: redhorse

I don't know what part the person with autism played...


Well, I don't either. But I can tell you that it is entirely possible to get into a car with someone and have things go terribly sideways and you had no idea that it was going to go that way. If my presence within the vicinity, or in the vehicle is all that was required... well, I'd be in prison.

Yes, you would. The moral of the story is be real careful who's car you get into, what the people in the car are planning for the evening and in general what they are holding.

If you get in a car and happen to be in it when somebody 'suddenly' shoots out the window, thats pretty stupid on your part to not know that person well enough to know they were carrying a firearm and or capable of such an act.

I meant it happens, especially around more dangerous neighbor hoods and or gangs and or drug abuse.

On the other hand, say you are in a car and somebody is shooting at you and you defend yourself, then thats legal.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 02:00 PM
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originally posted by: redhorse

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: redhorse

I don't know what part the person with autism played...


Well, I don't either. But I can tell you that it is entirely possible to get into a car with someone and have things go terribly sideways and you had no idea that it was going to go that way. If my presence within the vicinity, or in the vehicle is all that was required... well, I'd be in prison.

Just replying twice...

if in that scenario, you exit the vehicle , go to the nearest phone and report what just happened, tell the cops everything, testify in open court, theres a good chance you' won't do time for the crime. Escaping retribution for being a snitch on your 'friends' is another matter.



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