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posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 03:58 AM
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i was thinking if i was asked for advice on strategy for certain situations.

now i know i am not old and wise. but what i know i know, and what i know is the game of chess.
i have played poker a few times and understand it a little. a checkers is not my game. but i believe these games are given to us from higher powers to teach us examples. now i will get to the point of this.

i am quite the good chess player and i believe the game is a game of war albeit nobody ever gets hurt. but if you want to take the game into real life scenario you need to look at the game of chess. learn it, understand it.
what you want to do is have a sound opening or even a book opening in which you play the first 10 or so moves that you know have been played many times and proven ways to open the game.
you can also play the opening out of book if you are good enough and you can throw your opponent out his game by playing moves he does not predict. in chess you want the initiative, to always be 1 move ahead of your opponent or more if you can but 1 is usually enough.
you want to set up all your peices on the board before you make any attack on your opponent.

never bring out your strongest piece the queen to early or it will get trapped usually. now in the game of poker, the idea is to be able to read your opponent to know what hand he is holding, whether he is bluffing or truly has a good hand.
see what other players are doing, are they folding at his bluff? is he a cheater with an ace up his sleeve if so then the ace up his sleeve does not play into effect.

now in checkers you have people who will hug the edge of the board where they generally do not get involved.
edit on 12-8-2017 by lizardghost because: (no reason given)

edit on Sat Aug 12 2017 by DontTreadOnMe because: paragraphs!




posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 04:07 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 04:24 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358


edit on 8122017 by frenchfries because: beh



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 04:54 AM
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The AI people have looked at these games for decades. There is general way of trying to win these games, and that is to try and look at the future "holographically", see every possible future move and outcome for all sides. Then you build up a "game tree" which is like a branching tree of every move and outcome until someone wins, loses or there is a draw or checkmate:

en.wikipedia.org...

Chess, Othello, Reversi, Checkers, Tic-Tac-Toe, Five-In-A-Row are all strategy games.
Card games are games of luck and chance.

With strategy games, the early moves are forgiving, but then the wrong intermediate move will send you down the path of failure or success. Each branch has an average chance of winning/losing. Then it becomes a sum wrestling match to try and push your opponent down the direction you want.



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 05:05 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 05:09 AM
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a reply to: stormcell

yes i suppose how a program or computer such as deep fritz plays and wins. it has everything in its database



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 09:26 AM
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Poker strategy can be used in life situations and it is incredibly effective. I can't even begin to type why because you need to be fairly advanced at poker before anything will sink in. Not meaning to sound elitist, I just can't be bothered to type it out on my phone.

Now, chess is a game I can play but I cannot no matter how much I try become 'advanced'. Learning opening moves, predicting an opponents opening sequences, always playing the most advantageous move whilst thinking a few goes ahead, knowing that you know your opponent knows that you know he knows you know that he knows what you might do next. It's a solid game and I have massive respect for anyone who gets better than average.



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 09:28 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: lizardghost

I'm just a wood pushing patzer, but I generally think five full moves ahead . thinking only one move ahead ain't gonna cut it for any serious player..

Respectfully,
~meathead

My Sig Is my reply as black to anything other than the queens pawn. A modified caro kann with an early a6..



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: Mike Stivic

the initiative is different than thinking moves ahead. it is hard to explain but it means somthing like where you control the board and force your opponent to make there move as you want them too. there is also somthing called gaining a tempo, somewhat like the initiative.



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 12:23 PM
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originally posted by: lizardghost
i am quite the good chess player and i believe the game is a game of war albeit nobody ever gets hurt.


It is a game of strategy. War isn't necessarily always about who has the best strategy, Hannibal kicked the Roman's asses for over a decade but ultimately Carthage lost, not because of poor strategy but because Rome could continually replenish their resources. That would be like playing chess with two sets of pieces to your opponent's one.



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: Mike Stivic

Do you think five moves ahead knowing that your opponent knows you are thinking five moves ahead? Or do you just think five moves ahead?



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: and14263

On the average I think five..when I used to play my nephews three.. when I play my father I push as far ahead as I can..sometimes up to seven or eight..

When I say full moves I mean I count both players moves in a turn as a full move..so..

1. e4 c6

Would be one full move to me.

I won a small closed tournament at a community college when I was in my early twenties and for that I consistently pushed to seven..I'm not a pro or a master..thinking that far ahead consistently for me is taxing.

I don't play often anymore. Only over the board games I can't stand internet play. There was a small chess club at the vape shop in lyndonville for a while but attendance slowed down to a trickle. My pops won't play me but once a year these days. And he's a sore loser lol..

So basically if I'm taking it seriously I don't care how far ahead my opponent is thinking, because I'm already pushing my best to get to seven or eight..

Respectfully,
~meathead



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: lizardghost

Thanks for the lesson.


But,

How do you gain tempo or "the move" if you are not thinking ahead?

Edited to add;

I believe an example of what you are trying to say would be the Danish gambit or the goering gambit.

Where in white gives up an early pawn without recapturing to get an extra piece developed.
As white I always test out New opponents with those lines..if I lose I know they know the refutation and I'll move into something more complex.

But without thinking ahead, you would not gain the tempo.

Respectfully,
~meathead
edit on 12-8-2017 by Mike Stivic because: added example



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 01:37 PM
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Im the opposite. I generally think 5 moves behind.a reply to: Mike Stivic



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: Mike Stivic
I see. Incredible really, from my point of view. In poker you think ahead, but there are only three moves and the only variation is the amount of chips linked to just one of those moves. But in chess I feel the quantity of moves/decisions is vast. More decisions = more chance to make a mistake. Kudos.



posted on Aug, 12 2017 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: and14263

The hardest part is the mid game..after a while the choices of good moves tend to diminish making it easier to calculate..

Respectfully,
~meathead



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