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Beef Jerky Soup

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posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 09:46 AM
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In my country jerky is known as biltong. For this recipe you can use beef or antelope jerky. I'm making this tonight,will go into town a bit later to get cream and jerky,so maybe it will be beef,maybe antelope,depends what looks best when i get to the shop.Will post pics of my soup later,this one is from the recipe. I tend to follow recipes only very vaguely,and for this one i will have to double up the ingredients anyway.

barbertontimes.co.za...





posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 10:42 AM
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In the US, our jerky tends to be marinated, salted, smoked and heavily flavored.

Is yours the same way?

I ask because for any US person attempting this recipe, it would make a huge difference. We have another product called dried beef you can get that might be closer to biltong, or else, we might be better off making our own specifically for the purposes of making this.

I am also wondering if this should get it on with Wisconsin beer cheese soup and have a love child.

edit on 4-7-2017 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko
Yea that stuff by O baileys and that other one always in red packaging is mostly BS. The stuff I get from New Mexico is the real deal dried beef. sometimes they season it, but none of those corn syrup injections you see on the checkout register impulse shelf items.



posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 04:18 PM
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I never had soup made with Jerky. They used to make soup out of jerky many years ago. The cowboys did that back a few hundred years ago here in America. I suppose some people still make it. I do make scalloped potatoes with salted and dried codfish once in a while.



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 07:35 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
I never had soup made with Jerky. They used to make soup out of jerky many years ago. The cowboys did that back a few hundred years ago here in America. I suppose some people still make it. I do make scalloped potatoes with salted and dried codfish once in a while.

The cowboys got the idea from the American Indians. They made soups from bison jerky.



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 09:07 AM
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Well i made it and it came out Delicious
Will take a pic when i reheat the rest of it tomorrow,tonight im just making french fries+roast chicken drumsticks.

I made a big pot of this.Our friend Nick reckons its one of the best soups he's had.I tripled the recipe,with extra spice like garam masala,rough ground steak+chops spice,very jerky heavy,lots of freshly chopped coriander.Came out swell and to eat with the soup i made my own cheddary crusty breadrolls.



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Hi Kets,i think the dried beef sounds about right.The local jerky is not generally marinaded,but some shops do keep that type also.One can get a lot of plain dried types,beef and antelope,they are often dried coriander spice heavy though.Which we personally don't mind.But the shops usually sell an "original" version of the beef and most popular antelope varieties,that is the safest option for general cooking and baking.Just the basic mildly spiced version.Biltong is the national snack so one can find a vast variety locally.

I was going to use antelope for this but last night they only had Kudu and it was very very dry so i just used the beef.



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 09:50 AM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
In the US, our jerky tends to be marinated, salted, smoked and heavily flavored.

Is yours the same way?

I ask because for any US person attempting this recipe, it would make a huge difference. We have another product called dried beef you can get that might be closer to biltong, or else, we might be better off making our own specifically for the purposes of making this.

I am also wondering if this should get it on with Wisconsin beer cheese soup and have a love child.

Dried beef is heavily salted too.
If a person has a dehydrator, they can dry beef or venison without any salt or spices (and sugar... most commercial jerky in the US has a lot of sugar) to make an equivalent of biltong or native American jerky.

My family used to make 'dried beef' from venison when I was a kid. It involved pickling the hind quarter of a deer in brine, then smoking it and letting it dry thoroughly before chipping it. We used it in sandwiches and for chipped 'beef' gravy.



posted on Jul, 12 2017 @ 02:28 AM
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I suppose the jerky could be used something like the way my wife uses bacon in certain soups. I imagine a similar flavor.



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: Dudemo5

Yes certainly bacon can be used. I buy those budget packs of diced bacon,and fry it in one go. Then i freeze it in different containers for pizza/baked potato toppings,pasta,soup etc.



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 06:02 PM
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Here's the promised pic of my soup:




posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 06:04 PM
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And with it i make my mini-breads,just flour,yeast,few drops of olive or coconut oil and salt. Also grated cheddar,finely chopped green bell pepper and some fine chopped beef jerky,dried oregano or any mixed Italian herbs,ground black pepper.any spice you love that's compatible:




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