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Australian police find Nazi machine-gun in traffic stop.... yup.

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posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 10:42 AM
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a reply to: badw0lf

I think it is worth considering anything you require paperwork to have permission to own, not a right, but a regulated privilege.

Put another way, if someone has the ability to deny you a thing, it cannot be considered a right, under the law prevailing in the location concerned.




posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 10:49 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
It was a 'Nazi' gun, so he has that going against him from the start.
You realize that's like calling a Volkswagen a "Nazi car" right?
This is in Australia mind you. Most likely anti-gun Nazi-phobia...



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 10:52 AM
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The photo that was provided shows a taped grip and apparently no barrel. Is there way to tell if the barrel was sawed off leaving the chamber intact with only a stub of the barrel? If that is the case, it could be operable but I would expect the recoil springs would have to be modified.
This could have been a receiver for sale to the highest bidder, or a weapon to be used by criminals --or Mad Max.

As to those who believe that a barrel is necessary for forensics, not so. The ejected cases are tracable to individual firearms and this little gem will provide lots of those when operated.

For the record, serials are on receivers or trigger groups [SIG] of modular firearms. Barrels and slides are not controlled.
edit on 6/20/2017 by pteridine because: ETA



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 11:02 AM
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a reply to: pteridine

Um....

Barrels are the only source of rifling striations on the bullets themselves. Without the barrel to test fire, one cannot establish whether the bullet that one found at a crime scene, was fired from the gun in question, especially if the shooter collected their spent casings and discarded them wisely.

Doing so would deny forensic examiners any realistic way to match bullets to the gun from which it was fired, because both the casings (which would bear the imprint of the firing pin against the primer), and the barrel (whose unique characteristics would have left an imprint on the bullets fired) will be absent and unavailable for examination.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 11:12 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: pteridine

Um....

Barrels are the only source of rifling striations on the bullets themselves. Without the barrel to test fire, one cannot establish whether the bullet that one found at a crime scene, was fired from the gun in question, especially if the shooter collected their spent casings and discarded them wisely.

Doing so would deny forensic examiners any realistic way to match bullets to the gun from which it was fired, because both the casings (which would bear the imprint of the firing pin against the primer), and the barrel (whose unique characteristics would have left an imprint on the bullets fired) will be absent and unavailable for examination.



Um?
If it doesn't have a stub barrel, firing the weapon with any barrel will allow examination of the impressions made by the bolt and firing pin on the base of the casing. If you have ever fired a fully automatic weapon, you would know that it is nearly impossible to find all of the spent casings. Even traps on the receiver leak shell casings [and cause jams, which are bad]. Firing with the receiver inside a vehicle and the muzzle outside fares a little better but finding all the empties inside a vehicle is also problematic and vehicles used for crimes are usually stolen and often later recovered.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: butcherguy

It looks like it does..



Still has its bolt too.


Oh, I see.
You did an edit to add the part about the bolt.
It can have a bolt in the receiver, but without that barrel, it won't fire.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: pteridine
The photo that was provided shows a taped grip and apparently no barrel. Is there way to tell if the barrel was sawed off leaving the chamber intact with only a stub of the barrel? If that is the case, it could be operable but I would expect the recoil springs would have to be modified.
This could have been a receiver for sale to the highest bidder, or a weapon to be used by criminals --or Mad Max.

As to those who believe that a barrel is necessary for forensics, not so. The ejected cases are tracable to individual firearms and this little gem will provide lots of those when operated.

For the record, serials are on receivers or trigger groups [SIG] of modular firearms. Barrels and slides are not controlled.

The article says that the barrel is missing.
I doubt the writer would have missed out on the chance to rail on about a 'sawed off' barrel, if it was there.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 12:42 PM
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A "nazi" gun? Really? Are they sure it was even made in Germany?

How many here know that that particular gun was also produced under license in several other nations after the WW2.

I may be misremembering but Spain and Egypt were among them...I think. I can't find my book that tells about it. They looked much like it, and operated like it--but weren't in any way "nazi".

Nazi. He's doomed.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: badw0lf


I'll just 3D print a barrel and pew pew sieg heil, thank you very much...

Go ahead pew pew, it'll melt.

Who told you printers can forge gun barrels?



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 01:26 PM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
a reply to: Chadwickus

And if he did not own a barrel... or have documented plans to purchase one or pick one up from a friend, acquaintance.. .gang banger... terrorists..The great spaghetti monster.. or the smurfs..

What you have there is a bloody paper weight...despite all the tears and wailing from the hack at the bbc.


Depends on the definition of firearm. If it's otherwise functional except for the missing barrel, it would still be treated as a firearm in the UK and, at a wild guess, Australia. Heck, even the second bolt for my AR is treated the same as a complete firearm and needs a separate slot on the license. Ridiculous but true.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 01:32 PM
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originally posted by: dragonridr
a reply to: butcherguy

Even in the United States I can buy recievers for automatic weapons. But to buy a barel you need a dealer license.


I really, really think you should check your laws before trying that. "Denial islands" are a thing. Needing a dealer license to buy a barrel - not so much. Unless there is some very specific type of barrel that is somehow regulated, but I've never come across it in my years of involvement with firearms on both sides of the Atlantic.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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So I guess an AK47 is now a Commie Rifle?
Hahahah



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: butcherguy





You mention having the chamber welded up, this gun has no chamber to weld up.



If the weapon has a receiver (and it does) then it has a chamber.


No. In almost all (non-revolver) cases, the chamber is a part of the barrel, and for good reason. I say "almost all" because, while I cannot think of any examples off the top of my head where this is not the case, there are all sorts of weird firearms out there.

Revolvers are slightly different, for obvious reasons, which also has interesting forensic side effects as a result of the bullet needing to jump to the barrel.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 01:47 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
That would mean that the part that the reporter wrote describing it as 'in working order' is false.


Under Australian law, it's not considered inoperable unless the firing mechanism (including trigger) has been welded together, among other things. If it's not certified as permanently inoperable, it's considered a working firearm - even if some bits are missing, they can be fitted later.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: intrptr
Yes. Possession is the critical part.


Without the barrel his weapon is considered inoperable, not a firearm in the legal sense.


So, in the US, what part of an AR15 is considered the "firearm in the legal sense"?

The correct answer is... the lower receiver.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: intrptr
Nope, all you need is good mechanical skills and basic tools, I even saw a "60 minutes" section some time ago about the availability of 80% receivers for AR15 and AK47.
At one time I had an MP40, Sten and Sterling short kits, decided to sell them and buy airsoft/cap replicas instead, Marushin makes some nice ones.
edit on 20-6-2017 by manuelram16 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:47 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: pteridine
The photo that was provided shows a taped grip and apparently no barrel. Is there way to tell if the barrel was sawed off leaving the chamber intact with only a stub of the barrel? If that is the case, it could be operable but I would expect the recoil springs would have to be modified.
This could have been a receiver for sale to the highest bidder, or a weapon to be used by criminals --or Mad Max.

As to those who believe that a barrel is necessary for forensics, not so. The ejected cases are tracable to individual firearms and this little gem will provide lots of those when operated.

For the record, serials are on receivers or trigger groups [SIG] of modular firearms. Barrels and slides are not controlled.

The article says that the barrel is missing.
I doubt the writer would have missed out on the chance to rail on about a 'sawed off' barrel, if it was there.


Given the technical abilities of writers, they may have missed it unless they are able to see it close at hand or disassemble it. The truth should come out at some point.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: pteridine

originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: pteridine
The photo that was provided shows a taped grip and apparently no barrel. Is there way to tell if the barrel was sawed off leaving the chamber intact with only a stub of the barrel? If that is the case, it could be operable but I would expect the recoil springs would have to be modified.
This could have been a receiver for sale to the highest bidder, or a weapon to be used by criminals --or Mad Max.

As to those who believe that a barrel is necessary for forensics, not so. The ejected cases are tracable to individual firearms and this little gem will provide lots of those when operated.

For the record, serials are on receivers or trigger groups [SIG] of modular firearms. Barrels and slides are not controlled.

The article says that the barrel is missing.
I doubt the writer would have missed out on the chance to rail on about a 'sawed off' barrel, if it was there.


Given the technical abilities of writers, they may have missed it unless they are able to see it close at hand or disassemble it. The truth should come out at some point.

I believe that the police reported that the barrel was missing. Not saying that they know what they are talking about, but they would know better than your everyday MSM reporter.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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That weapon can be made from scratch fairly easy. Probably more simple to do than reversing the modifications to disable them. I remember a kid on YouTube that made one...



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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originally posted by: EvillerBob

originally posted by: butcherguy
That would mean that the part that the reporter wrote describing it as 'in working order' is false.


Under Australian law, it's not considered inoperable unless the firing mechanism (including trigger) has been welded together, among other things. If it's not certified as permanently inoperable, it's considered a working firearm - even if some bits are missing, they can be fitted later.

That definition is crazy.
A firearm that can not fire a bullet is not an operable firearm by my definition, only because it makes sense.



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