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Marvel Cancels Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Black Lives Matter Comic Due to Poor Sales

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posted on May, 15 2017 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Intriguing, yes, very much so as an idea.
Having no experience in sub- Saharan places, I wouldn't know.
I do know in the little bit of time I've spent trying to be good to others and their viewpoints- the more I find how narrow minded they can be , just like me.
As to the cause - I've no idea. All I know is that as one the lowly working class - I find it very hard to make time to understand the whimsical dreaming of spoiled kids raised on Internet ideals that have no understanding of actual life.




posted on May, 15 2017 @ 08:11 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

Thank you for the heads up.

I didn't realize Marvel made a BLM comic.

Next time I have the urge to buy a Marvel comic I will be sure to remember they made a BLM comic and will spend my money else where.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 08:19 PM
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originally posted by: DrStevenBrule
a reply to: seasonal

Thank you for the heads up.

I didn't realize Marvel made a BLM comic.

Next time I have the urge to buy a Marvel comic I will be sure to remember they made a BLM comic and will spend my money else where.



Don't watch ESPN, ABC, Star Wars or any other Lucasfilm project, or Marvel.
Or Winnie the Pooh, the muppets...

Are you just angry because they produced a black comic that may have portrayed values that aren't yours? Because you can always just opt not to buy it...

Good luck getting through watching sports and no black atheletes with opinions on ESPN...



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: the owlbear

Yeah, but then you'd be bound to keep it true to Nigeria.

By creating and world-building Wakanda, you have the freedom to make your own thing to a certain degree which is why I'd go that route.

I'd research Sub-Saharan cultures and beliefs in order to build something plausible, but I'd want it to be something I can sandbox so I don't feel the need to be too authentic. I'd hate to offend Nigerians. There are no Wakandans to offend.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 08:32 PM
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I wish they'd make a comic about an elderly internet keyboard warrior with a limp.

His super power would be to always be able to pick out the nicest melons and avacados at the market.


He could fight dandruff.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 09:48 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: the owlbear

Yeah, but then you'd be bound to keep it true to Nigeria.

By creating and world-building Wakanda, you have the freedom to make your own thing to a certain degree which is why I'd go that route.

I'd research Sub-Saharan cultures and beliefs in order to build something plausible, but I'd want it to be something I can sandbox so I don't feel the need to be too authentic. I'd hate to offend Nigerians. There are no Wakandans to offend.


Wakanda was created, what, like '63-'65 ish? Fantastic Four.
I agree to everything you said about it's better that it's fictional. Gave a lot more room for writers over the years.
I was just trying to say that Sub-Saharan Africa has quite a bit of culture that the west doesn't know about. And Nigeria is one of the world's fastest growing economies. Hell, I didn't even know it was so developed until a few years ago.

I do agree T'challa needs a decent book.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 09:55 PM
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I think this might be a good place to put this.

This is what happens when a character is a character with a good story to tell. Without Blade we might not be discussing this much at all because comics might not be enjoying such a movie-fueled Renaissance.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 08:16 AM
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originally posted by: the owlbear

originally posted by: DrStevenBrule
a reply to: seasonal

Thank you for the heads up.

I didn't realize Marvel made a BLM comic.

Next time I have the urge to buy a Marvel comic I will be sure to remember they made a BLM comic and will spend my money else where.



Don't watch ESPN, ABC, Star Wars or any other Lucasfilm project, or Marvel.
Or Winnie the Pooh, the muppets...

Are you just angry because they produced a black comic that may have portrayed values that aren't yours? Because you can always just opt not to buy it...

Good luck getting through watching sports and no black atheletes with opinions on ESPN...


You sound quite upset with another having different values. Why is that?

And I haven't watched a single thing you have mentioned in well over 10 years.

Propaganda is not entertainment to me.


edit on 16-5-2017 by DrStevenBrule because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: DrStevenBrule

Propaganda is everywhere you look, it's the medium that changes.

If not TV, then magazines, newspapers, radio, even at your job, propaganda is everywhere.

Not just TV.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: cenpuppie

No doubt.

The trick is learning to identify it.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 10:27 AM
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Like many decisions that are made based on political correctness, this too was doomed to fail.

If you are making comic books, you are trying to find characters that people will be interested in. If your characters don't interest people you will have poor sales.

Basically, you can't force politically correct BS on people.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 11:39 AM
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Eh, sometimes Marvel produced a stinker. This still got twice as many issues as the Stan Lee penned Night Cat. This comic may have been the product of a more inclusive philosophy over at Marvel but that same philosophy also gave us Miles Morales, a character most believe to be the superior Spider-Man.

I'm also confused by the people saying politics should stay out of comics. The first issue of Captain America was published in 1940. That's a full year before we entered WWII. Yet Jack Kirby has Cap punching Hitler on the cover. That was such a clear political statement that the NYPD provided Kirby and Joe Simon a police escort to protect them from Nazi sympathizers in the US.

Or we can look to Stan Lee's greatest (maybe second greatest) creation, the X-Men. The original concept behind it was to offer a commentary on race relations in the US.

And of course one could always bring up the political commentary found in Watchmen.

Bringing comics and politics together has given us some of the greatest comics in history. The problem with what Marvel is doing right now isn't the fact that they're trying to be more diverse or that they're taking a political stand. The problem is that they're being very heavy handed about it. As we've seen with Miles Morales, when the characters are allowed to organically grow they become huge hits.

It will be interesting to see how things play out later this year when Legacy hits.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: Xcalibur254

The best political commentary in media makes its statement without being a statement.

For example, both left and right love The Hunger Games because each is convinced that the very real political themes in those books are about the dangers of the other ideology. In other words, the books make their point without being a statement. 1984 is the same as is Brave New World.



posted on May, 19 2017 @ 04:33 AM
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originally posted by: DrStevenBrule
a reply to: cenpuppie

No doubt.

The trick is learning to identify it.



Exactly bro. You already know



posted on May, 19 2017 @ 05:10 AM
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People are so under attack with politics that they want an escape from it, Marvel just went "cuck'o'capitalized" with the theme and lost.




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