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The March for Science Because There is No Planet B

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posted on May, 6 2017 @ 02:59 PM
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originally posted by: Greven
a reply to: D8Tee

How long does water vapor stick around in the air?


Interesting question.

Until it decides to fall back down to the ground?




posted on May, 6 2017 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee
Less than two weeks on average.

So, how does it get there in the first place, if the Earth ought to be 255K?



posted on May, 6 2017 @ 06:07 PM
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originally posted by: Greven
a reply to: D8Tee
Less than two weeks on average.

So, how does it get there in the first place, if the Earth ought to be 255K?

I'm not about to let you lead me down a rabbit hole and have you place me on the wrong side of the second law of thermodynamics.

I don't consider Stefan–Boltzmann law to be the be all end all of climate change. It's much more complicated than that.



posted on May, 6 2017 @ 06:12 PM
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The atmosphere has a moderating effect. Without it, it would reach more than 100 C at day and less than -100 C at night. The moon and the space station clearly demonstrate this when atmosphere is absent. The atmosphere does not increase temperature. As is basic knowledge, energy cannot be created or destroyed in thin air. All of Earth's heat comes from the fusion nuclear reaction on the Sun, which transforms matter into energy according to E = mc^2.

Without the atmosphere, the surface would be the only place where heat on Earth can exist and would not be able to support life. The atmosphere through conduction makes the surface cool in the day and warm at night. Without the atmosphere the surface would have extreme temperatures in a 24 hours day rather than a more or less uniform temperature in a 24 hours day.
edit on 6-5-2017 by allsee4eye because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2017 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: D8Tee

originally posted by: Greven
a reply to: D8Tee
Less than two weeks on average.

So, how does it get there in the first place, if the Earth ought to be 255K?

I'm not about to let you lead me down a rabbit hole and have you place me on the wrong side of the second law of thermodynamics.

I don't consider Stefan–Boltzmann law to be the be all end all of climate change. It's much more complicated than that.

Please clarify here.

Do you think the Stefan-Boltzmann law does not apply to the Earth?
edit on 19Sat, 06 May 2017 19:59:15 -0500America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago5 by Greven because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2017 @ 08:33 PM
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originally posted by: Greven

originally posted by: D8Tee

originally posted by: Greven
a reply to: D8Tee
Less than two weeks on average.

So, how does it get there in the first place, if the Earth ought to be 255K?

I'm not about to let you lead me down a rabbit hole and have you place me on the wrong side of the second law of thermodynamics.

I don't consider Stefan–Boltzmann law to be the be all end all of climate change. It's much more complicated than that.

Please clarify here.

Do you think the Stefan-Boltzmann law does not apply to the Earth?
As said by IPCC in its TAR (2001) “we are dealing with a coupled non-linear chaotic system, and therefore the long-term prediction of future climate states is not possible.” Has this state of affairs changed since 2001?



posted on May, 6 2017 @ 09:01 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

'Chaotic' doesn't mean 'violates the laws of physics' but 'unpredictable' given current understanding.

The full quote is:

In sum, a strategy must recognise what is possible. In climate research and modelling, we should recognise that we are dealing with a coupled non-linear chaotic system, and therefore that the long-term prediction of future climate states is not possible.

Emphasis on the last bit.
edit on 21Sat, 06 May 2017 21:04:04 -0500America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago5 by Greven because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2017 @ 01:05 AM
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originally posted by: Greven
a reply to: D8Tee

'Chaotic' doesn't mean 'violates the laws of physics' but 'unpredictable' given current understanding.

The full quote is:

In sum, a strategy must recognise what is possible. In climate research and modelling, we should recognise that we are dealing with a coupled non-linear chaotic system, and therefore that the long-term prediction of future climate states is not possible.

Emphasis on the last bit.


So what are they telling us with that admission?



posted on May, 7 2017 @ 05:35 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit




But as I said, too much of anything can be a bad thing. You can poison yourself with pure water if you drink enough of it, and you can die from breathing air which is too oxygen rich as well.


And you could have just as easily admitted you were wrong or moved on rather than write another paragraph of no substance - who would thought that too much water could hurt you? Gee I wonder why we have the vomit reflex.



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