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Elon Musk’s SpaceX Just Announced Hundreds of Open Positions

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posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 10:10 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

It applies to just the engineers/programmers but long hours for relatively low pay and poor benefits, bad management, and high burnout rates.




posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 06:08 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan
a reply to: soficrow

It applies to just the engineers/programmers but long hours for relatively low pay and poor benefits, bad management, and high burnout rates.


Ah. The New World Order. Everyone's a peasant.

Wonder if NASA will stay good.



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 03:29 AM
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Not moving to California. I'd move to Mars first.

But I'm glad to see Elon is setting his sights on Mars, and gladder to see good new jobs opening up anywhere in the US. Maybe NASA will increase employment next... or Lockheed Martin. They're big on competing with SpaceX.

Got to admit that controls engineer job made my mouth water, though.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 03:46 AM
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originally posted by: soficrow
Ah. The New World Order. Everyone's a peasant.

Wonder if NASA will stay good.


Not really a peasant, but SpaceX relies pretty highly on the fact that they're doing cool work, and they use that as a selling point to get you to take a worse salary and poorer working conditions. Many people do it, because it really is cool work.

NASA being a government employer comes with some extra worker protections, it will likely remain competitive.



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 03:47 AM
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I'm prolly too old.
But I can code a mean class.



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 04:12 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Ever thought about tutoring?

OO is admittedly my weakness. Procedurally, I've never found anything I can't handle. Especially in Assembly.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 04:16 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck
I hand entered (from a book) an assembler for my C64 and used it to make a hang glider racing game (Windmaster II). Served me and my buds well on rainy weekends.

Higher level languages are easier, what with the gobs of RAM available nowadays.



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 04:25 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Easier for you (and apparently most people) maybe... they give me fits.

But give me an MSP430 with my Assembly environment and I'll make it do anything I want.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 04:26 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Bit shifting is fun.
ROR
Push 'n pop.



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 04:29 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Yes it is. But push and pop are stack ops, not bitwise ops.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: soficrow>>>> Why do all these guys, Musk, Behos, Gates, Zuckerberg, why do they all come across as guys who might be villains in a James Bond movie? Not to mention the real creepys like the Rothschilds and the Rockefellers. South Park has done some good sendups of Musk and Gates.



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 10:55 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Phage

Ever thought about tutoring?

OO is admittedly my weakness. Procedurally, I've never found anything I can't handle. Especially in Assembly.

TheRedneck


Object Oriented is really fun. At 14 I first started teaching myself to program, and everything was more or less procedural for me until a couple years ago in my early 30's when I finally learned it. Now I despise procedural, OO was really quick and easy for me to pick up, and it's just so unbelievably powerful, I pretty much mastered it and fell in love in just a couple weeks. Also, inheritance is absolutely hilarious... I get such a kick out of some of the weird logic paths you get when things start inheriting.

Like anything, it just comes down to having the right teachers. I had several teachers try and fail to teach me OOP, then I hit the right one (ironically, a teacher I didn't like much) and it all fell into place.

It's not so much that OO lets you do new stuff, as it is it lets you be far more productive.


originally posted by: Phage
Higher level languages are easier, what with the gobs of RAM available nowadays.


Python is gods gift to man.

Also, I agree, bit shifting is loads of fun. In my class I'm pretty much the only student that really has a good grasp of bitwise operations and I love using them. Sadly, they're mostly obsolete these days. Compiler optimiztaions will insert them when they help, and skip them when they don't in most higher level languages, bitshifting is actually rarely even taught these days. AND/XOR still have their uses though.
edit on 5-4-2017 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-4-2017 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2017 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan


Like anything, it just comes down to having the right teachers.

Ain't it the truth! Hopefully I will find the right one someday. I know the basics, but application seems hard to correctly implement.


bitshifting is actually rarely even taught these days. AND/XOR still have their uses though.

It's still used a lot in embedded systems. The amount of RAM isn't as much of an issue there as is being able to predict clock cycles for each routine.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 6 2017 @ 09:24 AM
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Call me when the vulcans show up asking for zepram cockraine.



posted on Apr, 6 2017 @ 09:24 AM
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What?

No line cooks want to wok for SpaceX?







posted on Apr, 6 2017 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
Ain't it the truth! Hopefully I will find the right one someday. I know the basics, but application seems hard to correctly implement.


Let me know if you ever want me to try, I've taught a couple others from ATS some coding in the past.


It's still used a lot in embedded systems. The amount of RAM isn't as much of an issue there as is being able to predict clock cycles for each routine.


I could see that. Lots of embedded stuff still relies on those operations. I guess it would be more accurate to say that hardware engineers are the only people still taught it for the most part. There's been a push for higher level systems to abstract that all away which has positives and negatives.
TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 6 2017 @ 10:03 AM
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originally posted by: soficrow
What?

No line cooks want to wok for SpaceX?






SHitty Wok Workers.



posted on Apr, 6 2017 @ 10:12 AM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Be careful; I may well take you up on that offer. I just need to clear my plate a little.

I think there will always be a need for assembly-level programming, although it is becoming more and more sparse. At some level, someone still has to write the compilers and play in the bits. But for most applications... yeah, high level is becoming the norm.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 7 2017 @ 01:26 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

Do they need cooks??



posted on Apr, 7 2017 @ 08:35 AM
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originally posted by: Spider879
a reply to: soficrow

Do they need cooks??


Yes. From the OP:



...The jobs run the gamut of experience, from highly skilled engineering positions that require advanced degrees in astronautics, mechanical engineering, or physics to experienced line cooks







edit on 7-4-2017 by soficrow because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-4-2017 by soficrow because: lotsa oops







 
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