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What would happen to the human brain if you did not hate?

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posted on Feb, 19 2017 @ 02:00 AM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: Dnied


Actually in a thousand years we could look back at the morality of our society and see it no different than we assess life today and as It were, a thousand years ago.



True. The same power structures as 2000 years ago.




posted on Feb, 19 2017 @ 02:07 AM
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I don't know what would happen to the human brain without the concept of hate, but I know what the absence of hate looks like.

It looks just like my dog.
edit on 2017-02-19T02:08:08-06:002201719America/Chicago2 by c2oden because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2017 @ 07:28 PM
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Hatred is a means to focus an individual towards a goal and with relation to how it relates to affection?

A referent would be analogous in the sense that one projects upon an object of affection as well as an object of hate in the similar ways. I see a Woman that I think is beautiful and as a result I assign values to her that are not necessarily valid.

I approach to begin a conversation and find out that her only expressions of that of rejecting my advances. I could consider that the reasoning of her behavior has something to do with me. Or I can understand that my projections were incorrect and that she, while I found attractive had more to do with my projections than the woman as an individual.

Hatred is not a part of human personality and in so much it is not a fixed component of general characteristics or the character of an individual in general.



posted on Feb, 19 2017 @ 07:49 PM
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Scheming hatred

However, there was also an important difference. The areas of the frontal cortex associated with judgement and reasoning are typically less active when viewing a lover compared to someone more neutral, meaning they are less likely to feel critical of their partner.

The hate-filled subjects, though, only showed a reduction in one small part of this area, while the rest was still active.

We may use this area to judge the consequences of our actions and to predict the behaviour of our nemesis, Zeki says. “In love, you take leave of your senses and go wild for that person, but in hatred it seems you must be all there to calculate your next move,” he says.

The team found that the amount of brain activity corresponded with the level of hatred the subjects had previously admitted in the questionnaire.

[b[Zeki suggests similar brain scans could one day be used in court – for example, to assess whether a murder suspect felt a lot of hatred towards the victim.


www.newscientist.com...
edit on 19-2-2017 by Kashai because: Content edit




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