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Valentine's Day

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posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 02:59 PM
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I've just remembered that I inherited three Victorian valentine cards, framed behind glass.
The front of one of them carries the popular Victorian sentiment;
"A little Health. a little Wealth,
A little House, and Freedom."
I've adopted that as my house motto, and display the card above my mantelpiece.
The card was sent by my grandfather's uncle John to his (future?) wife Mary. The same is probably true of the other two, but they are without words.

Opening it up, I see on the left, inside the front cover;
"I am for ever true to you and you only".
Opposite that, the main message has difficult handwriting in fading ink, but I can try again to make it out;
"February 14th at [?]
My dear Mary
It is just to keep up the custom
of sending you this Valentine
so loving and so true it
is [illegible] only
for you and if [God?]
spare me I will be at [/?]
from Truro[?]
So my dear don't be down
hearted for a [illegible] two
three [illegible]. It is my only thoughts to come to see
you- good bye for the
present
John Thomas"



edit on 14-2-2017 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Thank you for sharing, that...it is precious, the sweet sentiment on the cover and the personal writing inside.
Keep that safe! It is a little time capsule to warm ones heart, no matter what year we are in.



posted on Feb, 15 2017 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Wonderful sentiments and, to me, it appears the sentiments during that era were more strongly/deeper felt perhaps due to the fact that a disease could take your life at any time, or perhaps from being more involved in religion or higher moral values.

I am simply amazed as to all the artwork and effort that went into the cards at that time. Here's another example of a Victorian era Valentine's card.


edit on 02CST08America/Chicago05280828 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



 
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