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Telstra tests incredibly fast Gigabit LTE mobile network

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posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 06:24 AM
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and given the speed and effectiveness with which they've rolled out the nbn, i'm sure all australians will have access to this amazing new network.... about a decade after it's entirely obsolete ;




posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 10:00 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: 23432

What if the sound wave patterns were used in the transmit of high speed data ?



What sort of sound wave patterns? Over the phone?



Sound breaks the light barrier Jan 12, 2007 Nothing can travel faster than light… except for sound. This is the claim of some US physicists, who say they have designed an unusual waveguide to make sound move at "superluminal" speeds (Appl. Phys. Lett. 90 014102).
Sound often comprises numerous superimposed waves of various wavelengths. At certain points, these constituent waves can all combine constructively to produce a pulse, which moves through the medium at a velocity known as the "group velocity".


Sound breaks the Light Barrier

I wasn't thinking the wire as the medium , i had the mighty ath-mo-spehere in mind .



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 10:23 AM
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originally posted by: hellobruce

originally posted by: 23432
What if the sound wave patterns were used in the transmit of high speed data ?




One of these?


Perhaps but only without the Modem itself.



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 10:31 AM
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originally posted by: 23432

originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: 23432

What if the sound wave patterns were used in the transmit of high speed data ?



What sort of sound wave patterns? Over the phone?



Sound breaks the light barrier Jan 12, 2007 Nothing can travel faster than light… except for sound. This is the claim of some US physicists, who say they have designed an unusual waveguide to make sound move at "superluminal" speeds (Appl. Phys. Lett. 90 014102).
Sound often comprises numerous superimposed waves of various wavelengths. At certain points, these constituent waves can all combine constructively to produce a pulse, which moves through the medium at a velocity known as the "group velocity".


Sound breaks the Light Barrier

I wasn't thinking the wire as the medium , i had the mighty ath-mo-spehere in mind .
Very poorly written article, Jon Cartwright contradicts himself. First he says nothing can travel faster than light except sound, then in the 4th paragraph he says:

Indeed, the group velocity of light has already been shown to travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum.

That should be your first clue you can't trust the article when you see a self-contradiction like that.

What you also may not know is that the group velocity doesn't permit communication, so the fact that the group velocity of light has already been shown to travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum doesn't mean you can communicate faster than the speed of light, and if you somehow got the idea that the group velocity of sound might permit that, you can put that misconception to rest.

The speed of sound through the atmosphere is quite slow and this article doesn't change that, while EM radiation travels at near the speed of light, but not quite because the atmosphere isn't a vacuum.

edit on 201722 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 11:27 AM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: 23432

originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: 23432

What if the sound wave patterns were used in the transmit of high speed data ?



What sort of sound wave patterns? Over the phone?



Sound breaks the light barrier Jan 12, 2007 Nothing can travel faster than light… except for sound. This is the claim of some US physicists, who say they have designed an unusual waveguide to make sound move at "superluminal" speeds (Appl. Phys. Lett. 90 014102).
Sound often comprises numerous superimposed waves of various wavelengths. At certain points, these constituent waves can all combine constructively to produce a pulse, which moves through the medium at a velocity known as the "group velocity".


Sound breaks the Light Barrier

I wasn't thinking the wire as the medium , i had the mighty ath-mo-spehere in mind .
Very poorly written article, Jon Cartwright contradicts himself. First he says nothing can travel faster than light except sound, then in the 4th paragraph he says:

Indeed, the group velocity of light has already been shown to travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum.

That should be your first clue you can't trust the article when you see a self-contradiction like that.

What you also may not know is that the group velocity doesn't permit communication, so the fact that the group velocity of light has already been shown to travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum doesn't mean you can communicate faster than the speed of light, and if you somehow got the idea that the group velocity of sound might permit that, you can put that misconception to rest.

The speed of sound through the atmosphere is quite slow and this article doesn't change that, while EM radiation travels at near the speed of light, but not quite because the atmosphere isn't a vacuum.


This is going to end in Aether .



'Mach c'? Scientists observe sound traveling faster than the speed of light January 17, 2007 feature Read more at: phys.org...



For the first time, scientists have experimentally demonstrated that sound pulses can travel at velocities faster than the speed of light, c. William Robertson’s team from Middle Tennessee State University also showed that the group velocity of sound waves can become infinite, and even negative.
Past experiments have demonstrated that the group velocities of other materials’ components—such as optical, microwave, and electrical pulses—can exceed the speed of light. But while the individual spectral components of these pulses have velocities very close to c, the components of sound waves are almost six orders of magnitude slower than light (compare 340 m/s to 300,000,000 m/s).
“All of the interest in fast (and slow) wave velocity for all types of waves (optical, electrical, and acoustic) was initially to gain a fundamental understanding of the characteristics of wave propagation,” Robertson told PhysOrg.com.
“Phase manipulation can change the phase relationship between these materials’ components. Using sound to create a group velocity that exceeds the speed of light is significant here because it dramatically illustrates this point, due to the large difference between the speeds of sound and light.” Read more at: phys.org...


phys.org...



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: 23432
At least that author doesn't make such obvious self contradictions, but I still don't think you understand what these articles are saying if you think this is relevant to sound traveling through the atmosphere. They used wave guides, so first the atmosphere doesn't make an adequate wave guide for these experiments, and even if it did, you can't communicate at superluminal group velocities of light or sound:

Faster than light

In some situations, we can build a fairly exotic wave packet whose group velocity is greater than c. Does this then constitute an example of information being sent at a speed faster than light? It turns out that for these packets, information does not travel at the group velocity; instead, it travels at the signal velocity, which has to do with the time of arrival of the initial rise of the wave front as it reaches its destination. You might not now be surprised to learn that the signal velocity turns out always to be less than c.



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 12:20 PM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur
a reply to: 23432
At least that author doesn't make such obvious self contradictions, but I still don't think you understand what these articles are saying if you think this is relevant to sound traveling through the atmosphere. They used wave guides, so first the atmosphere doesn't make an adequate wave guide for these experiments, and even if it did, you can't communicate at superluminal group velocities of light or sound:

Faster than light

In some situations, we can build a fairly exotic wave packet whose group velocity is greater than c. Does this then constitute an example of information being sent at a speed faster than light? It turns out that for these packets, information does not travel at the group velocity; instead, it travels at the signal velocity, which has to do with the time of arrival of the initial rise of the wave front as it reaches its destination. You might not now be surprised to learn that the signal velocity turns out always to be less than c.




"The superluminal acoustic effect we have described is likely a
ubiquitous but imperceptible phenomenon in the everyday world," the
scientists conclude.
Citation: Robertson, W., Pappafotis, J., Flannigan, P., Cathey, J.,
Cathey, B., and Klaus, C. "Sound beyond the speed of light: Measurement
of negative group velocity in an acoustic loop filter." Applied Physics
Letters 90, 014102 (2007).

There are lots of argument to be made about whether or not athmosphere's properties are completely understood .

Sound is always unique and infinite , can be converted into other energy forms i.e light.



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 01:29 PM
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originally posted by: 23432
"The superluminal acoustic effect we have described is likely a
ubiquitous but imperceptible phenomenon in the everyday world," the
scientists conclude.
That claim is dubious because they used a wave guide and wave guides are not ubiquitous, but even presuming that was so, you can't have much of a conversation using something that's "imperceptible", right? The whole idea of a conversation is to perceive what the other person is saying.


Sound is always unique and infinite , can be converted into other energy forms i.e light.
How do you figure sound is always infinite? It seems to me like all sounds on Earth don't get past Earth's atmosphere which puts a finite limit on them, and while sounds certainly occur on other objects in the cosmos, space still seems to isolate the sound from each to a finite limit. It also seems that we can generate non-unique sounds all day long using a tone generator for example.



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 04:06 PM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: 23432
"The superluminal acoustic effect we have described is likely a
ubiquitous but imperceptible phenomenon in the everyday world," the
scientists conclude.
That claim is dubious because they used a wave guide and wave guides are not ubiquitous, but even presuming that was so, you can't have much of a conversation using something that's "imperceptible", right? The whole idea of a conversation is to perceive what the other person is saying.


To rephase the spectral components, the sound waves were sent through an asymmetric loop filter on a waveguide of PVC pipe, about 8 m long.
The 0.65-meter loop split the sound waves into two unequal path lengths, resulting in destructive interference and standing wave resonances that together created transmission dips at regular frequencies.

Due to anomalous dispersion (which changes the wave speed), sound pulses traveling through the loop filter arrived at the exit sooner than pulses traveling straight through the PVC.

With this experiment, the group velocity could actually reach an infinitely small amount of time, although the individual spectral components still travel at the speed of sound.

"We also achieved what is known as a 'negative group velocity,' a situation in which the peak of the output pulse exits the filter before the peak of the input pulse has reached the beginning of the filter," explained Robertson.

"Using the definition for speed as being equal to distance divided by time, we measured a negative time and thus realized a negative velocity." It might not seem that a negative velocity would exceed the speed of light, but in this case, Robertson said, the speed of the pulse is actually much faster than c.


This debate is going to end in whether Aether exists or not I suppose .



Sound is always unique and infinite , can be converted into other energy forms i.e light.
How do you figure sound is always infinite? It seems to me like all sounds on Earth don't get past Earth's atmosphere which puts a finite limit on them, and while sounds certainly occur on other objects in the cosmos, space still seems to isolate the sound from each to a finite limit. It also seems that we can generate non-unique sounds all day long using a tone generator for example.



Energy and it's primary expressions of light ,heat and sound are known to us all .

Consider for a moment that when you take a breath , all the air rushing thru your lungs make some "breathing " sound. I posit that the energy is eternal and that energy which was created when you took your breath is also eternal too.

Generation of non unique i.e repetitive sounds is not within the merit of this discussion but perhaps cloned energy is a better term in this context .

There is " sound " in space too , perhaps we need better detection tech.






edit on 2-2-2017 by 23432 because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-2-2017 by 23432 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 02:13 AM
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originally posted by: scubagravy
Telstra, pffffffffffffffft !!

Telstra is the provider for my internet, it is terrible. Even after buying the new State of the art Router, i get almost 2MB download speeds and 0.15MB upload speeds.

Definately not getting what i pay for per month.


By rights, legally at least it used to be, if they cannot offer the lowest service provided under the contract you signed, they can be taken up on it.

Say you are on ADSL1 - lowest is 1.5mbps down, 64kbps up iirc. So if you're on ADLS2/2+ you get either 8 or 12 mpbs down, and 512/1mbps up. if it is less than that, they cannot charge you the price of ADSL2/2+ because they are not supplying you with the lowest rate. ADSL2+ is up to 21mbps. so between 12 and 21mpbs is the range you should get.

If you're getting 2mbps down, and 0.15mb up, you are either on a rim, or they're not fulfilling their end.

This may have all changed, but I've seen people who migrated to the NBN getting similar to you... and there are always excuses, at least from iiNet. They're forcing everyone into limited fibre, and hoping it works. the NBN was the biggest scam ever, government orchestrated to simply get votes... the "bill gates" philosophy - 'no one will ever need more than 640kb ram'... but now his OS needs what, 2GB at the lowest? 8GB to be efficient?

the know it alls in out government have no clue. milking what they do know, because people are not speaking up enough.

Currently, I am synced at 11mbps, but I drop to 6 or 7 if I switch profiles to Gamer, that has lower latency, but slower speeds.

And I still remember years ago, on Eztv IRC talking to people in the Netherlands who had 100/100mbps to their Home, because they had the foresight to implement a realistic broadband infrastructure.

We're the equivalent of water supply in a remote African country - while every where else in the world is flooding in excess.

Telstra? the monopoly? they wont change a thing.. they'll just charge more so you get more pipe... gah I hate the government here.



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 02:15 AM
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originally posted by: Throes
I use LTE now in rural PA..

Beats the 1MB/s speed the DSL.... no cable..

I get 25-40Mbps from AT&T currently using a dedicated LTE router.




4G here is way faster than any landline based/fibre based speeds.. problem for us is, I'm on a 1GB cap for my 4G. 2GB really, 1GB on peak, 1GB off peak.. for $19 a month.. on top of my ADSL2+

if I were to switch to 4G entirely, I'd be in the hundreds per month to get what I now have.

And they're going to cut off what I currently have in short order.

Can anyone say monopoly?



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 02:25 AM
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originally posted by: savemebarry
Say you are on ADSL1 - lowest is 1.5mbps down, 64kbps up iirc. So if you're on ADLS2/2+ you get either 8 or 12 mpbs down, and 512/1mbps up. if it is less than that, they cannot charge you the price of ADSL2/2+ because they are not supplying you with the lowest rate.


Except Telstra do not sell ADSL1 or ADSL2+, just broadband....


Telstra? the monopoly?


What do Telstra have a monopoly over?
edit on 3-2-2017 by hellobruce because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 03:22 AM
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a reply to: savemebarry

Thank you for your reply,

Your details are correct, and i have called them, time and time again, and they always blame my pc, laptop or devices..

The other problem is that speaking with them is a challenge, the call centre is in the Phillipines and trying to understand them sometimes is a real pain in the cods, it's kinda ironic that they use a non english (native) at the helm of a COMMUNICATIONS company to speak with and sort your problems. I've started to believe they've done it on purpose to make us hesitant to call because there is not enough Nurofen in the world to ease the headache after 15 minutes of conversing.

Ahh, first world problems......



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 03:23 AM
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originally posted by: hellobruce

originally posted by: savemebarry
Say you are on ADSL1 - lowest is 1.5mbps down, 64kbps up iirc. So if you're on ADLS2/2+ you get either 8 or 12 mpbs down, and 512/1mbps up. if it is less than that, they cannot charge you the price of ADSL2/2+ because they are not supplying you with the lowest rate.


Except Telstra do not sell ADSL1 or ADSL2+, just broadband....


Telstra? the monopoly?


What do Telstra have a monopoly over?


The Monopoly is on the communication towers brucey baby

BTW, i am ADSL through Telstra.
edit on 3/2/2017 by scubagravy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 03:45 AM
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originally posted by: scubagravy
What do Telstra have a monopoly over?


The Monopoly is on the communication towers bruce.

No monopoly, just Telstra having the best mobile network, so more towers, there are also Optus and Vodaphone towers....



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 03:48 AM
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a reply to: hellobruce

Sorry, was that reply for me ?


And , it does not matter how good your product is, it can have issues, and if your customer service is amiss , then they better leave the tap on because someone's pulled the plug.
edit on 3/2/2017 by scubagravy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 07:34 AM
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originally posted by: hellobruce

originally posted by: savemebarry
Say you are on ADSL1 - lowest is 1.5mbps down, 64kbps up iirc. So if you're on ADLS2/2+ you get either 8 or 12 mpbs down, and 512/1mbps up. if it is less than that, they cannot charge you the price of ADSL2/2+ because they are not supplying you with the lowest rate.


Except Telstra do not sell ADSL1 or ADSL2+, just broadband....


Telstra? the monopoly?


What do Telstra have a monopoly over?


Oh I was under the impression that ADSL1/2/2+ were broadband. Silly ol' me. I never realised the difference.


ITU G.992.5 (also referred to as ADSL2+, G.dmt.bis+, and G.adslplus) is an International Telecommunication Union standard for asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL) broadband Internet access. The standard has a maximum theoretical download speed of 24 Mbit/s.


Oh wait, hello? Hello? Is there anybody in there? Just nod if you can here me, Bruce? Is there anyone home?

What monopoly does Telstra have??? Umm, well providers have to lease their copper infrastructure, for a start.

Fault with your line? Get a telstra techie to charge you $100 to determine the fault is in your residence... no ISP can determine that, just telstra.

Really...



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 07:41 AM
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originally posted by: scubagravy
a reply to: savemebarry

Thank you for your reply,

Your details are correct, and i have called them, time and time again, and they always blame my pc, laptop or devices..

The other problem is that speaking with them is a challenge, the call centre is in the Phillipines and trying to understand them sometimes is a real pain in the cods, it's kinda ironic that they use a non english (native) at the helm of a COMMUNICATIONS company to speak with and sort your problems. I've started to believe they've done it on purpose to make us hesitant to call because there is not enough Nurofen in the world to ease the headache after 15 minutes of conversing.

Ahh, first world problems......


Ahh call centres.. I worked at iiNet in the billing Dep. here in Perth.. Holy moley, never again. I should have known though, seeing as I am a customer also and have had to call them before. People like me make people like me doing the job I did something that I wouldn't do again !!

They also have a follow the sun policy - so say, in Perth, we have the call centre active. After 5pm, it goes over seas, I think New Zealand, and after midnight, it's in Cape Town, South Africa.

I had people call me saying they won't discuss any problems unless I was based in Australia... and trust me, not even that helps half the time. The call gets logged, and if it needs further action, the next customer service person reviews the logged call and actions, but it's like they sit on it till the next one. I've checked my support history in the toolbox here, and it goes from one to the next to the next for days, if not weeks. Still waiting on a simple thing to be closed...

But as a level 1 techie, they make you go through the hoops of localising any problem, before escalation... which is a pita for people who know how to perform an isolation test and have done so, they have to have been done while the techie was instructing them before anything else can proceed.

And with the non-english speaking people, it is frustrating as anything to describe a problem, and they repeat it back, completely incorrect.. lol

should be getting better here, but instead it's getting worse.



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 07:47 AM
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originally posted by: hellobruce

No monopoly, just Telstra having the best mobile network, so more towers, there are also Optus and Vodaphone towers....


Umm, so you're saying Telstra don't provide ADSL at all? What has towers got to do with it?

Sure the push to the NBN is fierce, and in short order all ADSL services will be obsolete as we're forced onto the NBN, but...



Critical Information Summary
Information about the service
Your plan is a bundle which includes:
• a home phone service
• Telstra home broadband for your internet service.

Service availability
Service not available to all areas, homes or customers. While we
perform preliminary qualification checks upfront for broadband
service availability, the type of service offered (ADSL, ADSL 2+,
Cable or Velocity) may be subject to further qualification checks
to determine what is available at your location.




edit on 6-2-2017 by savemebarry because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 01:55 AM
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I was going to start a new thread, but thought it was appropriate to put the following link in this one:

Australians are not ready for super-fast broadband, NBN chief says

With somebody like this in charge of the NBN project, no wonder the whole "initiative" has transformed into the current debacle that we are witness to.

General Information on the NBN


edit on 10/2/2017 by Dark Ghost because: (no reason given)



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